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Anti Bacterial soap

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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Anti Bacterial soap

Postby geniusvicks » Tue Mar 21, 2006 10:56 am

How does soap kill bacteria ?
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Postby shar » Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:56 pm

It contains Triclosan which is a brand name of a germ killer.
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Postby kiekyon » Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:18 pm

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Postby geniusvicks » Fri Mar 24, 2006 1:44 pm

The Dettol soap's ingredient says TCC. I want to know what exactly the compund is.
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Postby mith » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:14 pm

dettol's not really a soap per se
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
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Postby Georgie » Mon Mar 27, 2006 4:46 pm

i'm writting my dissertation on two types of antibacterials for hands at the moment, it's really interesting, and some of the results are quite amazing!
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Postby angel » Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:27 am

well, soap contains detergent in it in a small amount. detergent breaks the cell wall amembrane of bacteria and it gets killed.
What about this answer?
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Postby kiekyon » Tue Apr 11, 2006 2:43 pm

Soap is a surfactant agent, means that it has two different edges...one is polar edge which can bind with water and another one is non-polar edge which can bind with fat tails....
How soap remove microorganisms from our body? well, microorganisms have lipid envelope that surrounds their bodies...and another edge of the soap (polar tail) will get binded with water (that's why after soaping your body, the microorganisms can be easily removed from our body).
For anti-bacterial soap, they (the industries) add the soap components with some kinda bactericide (i.e. Triclosan).
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Postby kiekyon » Tue Apr 11, 2006 2:52 pm

The most common of these anti-bacterial chemicals in soaps is Triclosan. These chemicals kill bacteria in a variety of ways. Some chemically poison the bacteria, some cause it's cell walls to rupture and thereby, kill the bacteria, and some interfere with some of it's chemical process by preventing the movement of sodium or inhibiting other pathways.
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Postby BioChemistrySoldier » Sun Apr 16, 2006 1:18 am

I dont want to say it wrong but what type of chemical is triclosan? :?:
Dont stop til ya get enough.
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Soap and Bacteria

Postby aquaman_001 » Sun Apr 30, 2006 12:31 pm

Refer to General Biology and the denaturation of proteins. There are two ways this process occurs, temperature and pH. Soap causes a change or rise in pH in the environment surrounding the proteins comprising the bacterium and the use of warm water assists as a catalyst thus rendering the proteins nonfunctional through unfolding.
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