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toads & frogs!

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toads & frogs!

Postby oscar91 » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:22 pm

what is the difference between a toad and a frog?
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Postby February Beetle » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:27 pm

Order Anura are frogs and toads. Family Bufonidae are "true toads". They are described as having short legs and stout body with rough skin. But usually any Anura that is dryer on land are called toads.
True frogs are in Family Ranidae, they are usually wet and I think this family is described as having dorsolateral ridges all the way to the end of their body. Most Anura that are not considered toads are usually considered frogs.
There are slight differences between Anura families, it is hard to distinguish between frogs and toads unless you are looking at families (there are 21). Bufonidae and Ranidae are true frogs and true toads, then what are the other 19 families? Family Hylidae is tree frogs, but not TRUE frogs. Very confusing and I am not that educated in this, so I can’t give you the specifics within the families. I think you can call all Anura frogs, though.
Also, this is in North America where they call wetter frogs frogs and drier frogs toads. In some countries it is reversed. It’s kind of confusing, but that is the thing with common names vs. scientific names. Hope I helped at least a bit.
(You can look up frog families on wikipedia, I also used my Zoology textbook by Hickman Roberts Larson I'anson 2004)
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re: frogs and toads

Postby oscar91 » Sat Mar 18, 2006 3:04 am

Thanks for the help and i hope to get more soon with other questions i have about bio and that kind of stuff!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
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Postby David George » Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:37 pm

Hey Oscar I can also tell you some sorry if I am late.The easiest way to differentiate is by their skin the skin of frogs are smooth and that of toads have lumps on the surface of the skin.These may contain poisonous secretions had hence you better don't touch a toad.Toads can be seen in the summer season in dry land.But frogs always need water.Toads only need water for reproduction.
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Postby February Beetle » Sat Mar 18, 2006 3:39 pm

Tree frogs aren't usually found very close to water, and northern cricket frogs were I live, live in the water but have bumpy skin. It is only easy to distinguish in some cases. Some frogs are even more non-dependent on water then toads, the male carries it's young in it's throat until they develope. Darwin's Frog (Rhinoderma darwinii).
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Postby David George » Sun Mar 19, 2006 6:55 am

Well in India the ones that I gave are easier and tree frogs live in forested regions I am not sure if you can find one in a city.
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Postby February Beetle » Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:15 am

Since this is a biology forum I am just trying to get the point across that "The use of the common names 'frog' and 'toad' has no real taxonomic justification." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frog
It's like the word worm, that is used in many different species common names, but only one phyla are true worms.
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Postby alextemplet » Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:20 am

Great point, February Beetle! :) Common names rarely carry much weight in taxonomy; hence the "koala bear," "panda bear," "Tasmanian tiger," and "buffalo wings." :lol: Okay, maybe that last one's just a chicken . . . :P
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Postby February Beetle » Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:35 am

Or... "Rocky Mountain Oysters"
haha yum.
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Postby alextemplet » Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:38 am

Yuck. Everytime I hear that term I want to upchuck. There needs to be a "yuck" emoticon.
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