Login

Join for Free!
116939 members


bacteria having multiple genders?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderator: BioTeam

bacteria having multiple genders?

Postby HayleyNasman » Thu Feb 09, 2006 9:20 pm

I have heard that some kinds of bacteria have been found to have up to six different genders.

Does anyone know how these "different genders" are determined?
"Nothing is too wonderful to be true, be it consistent with the laws of nature."
- Michael Faraday
HayleyNasman
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 9:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Postby baikuza » Fri Feb 10, 2006 1:27 am

taxonomy...
all species is clssified by its characteristics...
maybe they are different between each other... at some aspect.
you can try
http://www.bacterio.cict.fr/bacdico/pp/ ... teria.html
http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/genre/proj ... .html?id=2

yes... some time using protein as the variable...
baikuza
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 429
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:09 am
Location: Yogyakarta, indonesia, south-east asia

Postby canalon » Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:51 pm

There is no such things as genders in bacteria, since genders are linked to sexual reproduction. But the transfer of plasmid can be impaired by the presence of other plasmids. Hence plasmids are grouped in "incompatibility groups". When you have one type of plasmid of one group (can be multicopy) bacteria will not allow plasmid from the same group to conjugate.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada


Postby GreenDog » Wed Feb 15, 2006 3:27 pm

Yeah, incompatibility groups in bacteria same as mating types in yeast, but it's definitely more romantic to think about a male bacteria meeting a good looking female bacteria...
"When In Danger Or In Doubt Run In Circles Scream And Shout"
Lawrence J. Peter
User avatar
GreenDog
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 126
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 8:37 am

Postby baikuza » Thu Feb 16, 2006 3:10 am

i think i need to take microbiology lecture so that i know.
(fufufu..)
baikuza
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 429
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:09 am
Location: Yogyakarta, indonesia, south-east asia

Postby victor » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:16 am

Canalon wrote:There is no such things as genders in bacteria, since genders are linked to sexual reproduction. But the transfer of plasmid can be impaired by the presence of other plasmids. Hence plasmids are grouped in "incompatibility groups". When you have one type of plasmid of one group (can be multicopy) bacteria will not allow plasmid from the same group to conjugate.


Recent study have discover that there's a mating between bacteria...they use the term for male is for bacteria which do attractant metabolism to attract other bacteria while they use the term for female for bacteria which don't do that kind of thing...
this kind of mating will result gene variation and other else aspects...
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.
User avatar
victor
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 2668
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:01 pm
Location: Yogyakarta, Indonesia..

Postby 2810712 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:13 pm

abt those incompatibility groups... is it like that - a bact has a definite set of plasmids... so it will not met with any bacteria with even one common plasmid in the set...& can only met with others?
And abt that attractant definitions...can't same bact do both things , i mean attracting and sometimes not attracting...i know bacts only reproduce once in lifetime but each time one releases attractant there may not be reproduction... but that will indicate maleness...and the same bact may be feminine due to some reason at the actual time of 'repro'.
The receptors and mRNAs must've been the clues...
2810712
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 697
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 12:19 pm

Postby Nithin » Fri Mar 17, 2006 12:35 pm

There is no such thing as genders in bacteria. But there is a term called fertility factor (which you all must be knowing, no doubt). This fertility factor is represented by the presence of the F plasmid. The bacteria having the F plasmid are categorised as F+ and those devoid of the F plasmid are termed as F-.
It has been proved that the Fertility factor is instrumental in the formation of the conjugation tube during conjugation(sexual reproduction).
F+ bacteria will conjugate with F- bacteria and the fertility factor will be transferred so that the F- bacteria becomes F+ one.
Just trivia, the genes responsible for the transfer of the fertility factor are the tra genes.
So in a layman's language (not professionally) maybe we can carelessly term the F+ bacteria as the male one which is wrong!!!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Known is a drop unknown is an ocean!!!
User avatar
Nithin
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:24 pm
Location: India, Asia. (Too many people!!!)


Return to Microbiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron