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hear the spring peepers-endangered

Discussion of the distribution and abundance of living organisms and how these properties are affected by interactions between the organisms and their environment

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Postby Linn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:20 pm

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q ... 005611&t=k

hope this works
copy and paste it in your search
this is the area
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby Ken Ramos » Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:31 pm

Thanks for your interest Linn, yes I am or have been doing some research but not environmental. I mentioned that I am an amateur stream biologist. By being an amateur, I am afforded the pleasure of studying the areas which suit me, without having to follow some stuffy curriculum set forth by some equally stuffy professor. However it does not afford me the company of like minded individuals. So, it makes for a lonely existance. :lol: However stream biology is not my only interest.

My research is slowly coming to close. Information is quite limited on it but however, from time to time cases pop up that capture my attention. You see, I have been studying and researching pathogenic ameba, namely those which cause amebic encephalitis. Examples are Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) and Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis (GAE). Both of which are 100% fatal if acquired. Exposure to the organisms which occur naturally in our environment are extreamly high but the chance of being infected are equally as low. :)

With that coming to a close, I have been considering the study of Plasmodial Slime Moulds (Molds) or Myxomycetes. These are wonderful creatures in that they start out life as an animal, an amoeba, and grow into a plant or what some may releate to as fungus. They are very beautiful, quite small, little is known about them, and the amateur can contribute to the scientific study of them signifcantly.

So as you can see my interests are extreamly varied but stream biology is among my top interests, mainly because I am a fly fisherman also. :lol: All in all, I love nature study. There are not too many things on Gods green earth, that I donot find interestesting, although there are some that I find quite repulsive, i.e. "spiders!" Yes I have a phobia! :lol:
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
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Postby Linn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:39 pm

:lol: lmao
OMG you should go to the fiber forum.

then again maybe not.

its the Jerry Springer show :lol:

but perhaps you already post there?

How about water gardening. do you have a pond or waterfall or anything.
I am registered with a gardening forum. they have a lot of interesting topics on water gardening/science etc.
and the people are very friendly, courteous and extremely nice. why not join us?
if you are interested i'll send the link
Last edited by Linn on Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby Linn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:42 pm

in case you were wondering
here is some info on the topic at the fiber forum:

about4736.html
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby Ken Ramos » Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:19 pm

Oh yes, I have read that forum post. :o Quite an interesting infection there. At first I thought it may be leprosy but I suppose not. I am a Site Administrator for http://www.amateurmicroscopy.net. That same individual posted that on our site also. You may find our site quite interesting, since we deal not only with microscopy but macro photography as well. If you have a camera, microscope or both you may be interested in joining and posting. If you don't, you could join just the same. Any constructive comments you have would be appreciated and we all learn a little something there about the subjects presented, even though we are basicly about photography. :D

I took a look at the satellite link you provided. Highly industrialised is definitely the right term I think. I may do a little reading up on the peepers to see if I can find out anything about their habits and reproductive cycles. Who knows, we may just stumble across something. :D
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
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Postby Ken Ramos » Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:15 pm

I did some research and came up with the following facts on the "peepers."

Number one, they are an indicator species. Peepers are extreamly sensitive to pollution or changes in their aquatic habitats. At present they are subject to widespread environmental monitoring programs. This may be a plus for you. :o Check to see if there is a program in your area or if not see what you can do to start one. The EPA maybe able to help you there.

They breed from March to June. Look in your area for eggs attached to grass stems, twigs, or branches in the water. Peepers will lay from 800 to 1000 eggs which will hatch in 6 to 12 days. Check for tadpoles which will transform from July through September.

Peepers will have an "X" pattern on their backs. The peepers home range is approx. 4 to 18 feet or 1.2 to 5.5 cm. Their daily travels may be anywhere from 20 to 130 feet or 6.1 to 39.6 meters.

The peeper also has its enemies as do most of us. There are at least twenty predators which feed on the peeper. During the wintertime, peepers retreat to the woods to winter over. Usually seeking shelter in the ground or under fallen leaves, trees, bark, etc.

Since they are extremely sensitive to pollution, it could be that the young tadpoles are not surviving the contaminates that maybe present still in the water or area in which they once thrived. As for predation, I think the probability is quite low or would be if the peepers were thriving in abundance. Check still for dead birds or other animals in the area. Have them tested too if you so desire. Insects which the peepers feed on may contain toxins also and thus may be killing off the peepers as well. :shock:

You mentioned taking water and core samples, becareful not to contaminate yourself. The EPA may be able to provide you with MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) sheets to guide you along. I use them when handling Biological Safety Level II organisms. :shock: PCB's are readily absorbed through the skin. Have a lab, if there is one available, to examine and test your samples. I have no idea how much this will cost you but it should not be overwhelming if you are seriously interested in finding out the levels of toxicity in your area.

So that's about it in a nutshell. :wink: This should give you a little something to start with Linn. I hope it helps you out. Another idea would be to contact the Sierra Club organization or others similar to it, to see if they can offer you any assistance or point you in the right direction to obtain some. :D
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
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Postby Linn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:22 pm

roger that ken,
just peeked at your cite.
looks interesting
I think I will join

I like that pic on the opening page is that an algae bloom
thanx

ans that satelite pic you can see west over Air force base if you keep movimg upand leftish
that was allowed to remain because it is a key strategic post between this coast and over "there" :roll: lol

I will post more about what is going on re the pollution. info here as I get it

you know I had contacted different organizations already with no response. because this city sucks!

you and I are the only ones conversing here. lol
but a lot of my friends said they listened. and I hope the kids that listen will get interested enough to study about it.
Last edited by Linn on Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby Linn » Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:26 pm

lol we just cross posted.

I would love to get some eggs to raise in my pond.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby AstusAleator » Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:25 am

I highly suggest you check out this book:
A Plague of Frogs, by William Souder
It's an excellent book on the effects of pollution on frogs and other amphibians.
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Postby Ken Ramos » Sun Feb 12, 2006 2:09 pm

AstusAleator replied:


I highly suggest you check out this book:
A Plague of Frogs, by William Souder
It's an excellent book on the effects of pollution on frogs and other amphibians


Thanks for the suggestion, I will keep it in mind. I too am becoming interested in Linns plight of the Spring Peeper. I did not know that they were an indicator speices until I began researching them in order to help Linn. I have a feeling that this could be a most interesting thread if we continue our research. :D
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
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Postby Linn » Sun Feb 12, 2006 3:10 pm

I hope Barnes and noble has that

but I can probably order it on-line,
Alex do you know a good source for ordering that?
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby Linn » Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:09 am

oh
here is s good one

yes, frogs indicator species

http://www.conservationmedicine.org/pap ... 202003.pdf
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Linn
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