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For discussing the functions of different structures of all organisms.
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Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:17 pm

yup2.. infected cells will also triggered the immune response. But to have infected cells, there must be an pathogen infection in the first place rite..

Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:33 pm

You wrote "infection" word there...if it isn't the cells that's been infected then what's the meaning of the "first place"?

Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:41 pm

uh oh.. i mean before there are infected cells, there must be a pathogen that enters the body and infect the cell rite..

Sat Jan 21, 2006 12:40 pm

Nite wrote:...infect the cell rite..

Yup, and that is the "first place"...(pay attention o the bold one..

Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:31 am

So lectin has a similar overall function as any PRRs: non-specific recognition of the pathogen.. but only that lectin can help to enhance immune reaction against re-infection of similar pathogens.

As I said, lectin is the most primitive immune system of the organisms that still do not armed by immunocompetent cells i.e. WBC. PRRs are owned by 'higher' organisms that already have immunocompetent cells. The principle is similar: to eliminate pathogens and to anticipate them from spreading over the body. The mechanism can be different: agglutination, killing, and/or phagocytosis.

I thought Pathogen recognition and self-non-self differentiation are based on two different mechanisms? That is pathogen (non-self pathogenic) recognition is done by innate immune system (through PRRs).
And self/non-self differentiation is achieved through differentiation of self MHC molecules from non-self MHC and peptide molecules? That is the non-self molecules will trigger an immune response..


Before go any further, you should understand the term "self, nonself", "antigen", "pathogen". Here i try to give you a clue: antigen can be self or nonself protein. Self protein will induce immune tolerance or we will not suffer disease(s). Nonself protein or foreign protein will initiate an immune response(s), the one that makes disease(s) is called "pathogen", whereas the one that triggers allergic reaction(s) is called "allergen".

The antigen recognition via PRRs belongs to innate immunity which the recognition is directly according to pattern-recognition I already mentioned above. The antigen recognition via MHC belongs to adaptive immunity. T-cells cannot recognize antigen directly like macrophage and granulocytes do, so they need a help from some other cells (APCs) to process the antigen into simple peptide and present it with MHC to them. The principle is similar: when PRRs and T-cells find it as self antigen it will lead to immunotolerance, whereas when PRRs and T-cells find it as nonself antigen, it will trigger an immune response. Via PRRs, the response will not specific, via T-cells it will be specific.

I think you know the rest... specific vs nonspecific, don't you? ;)


P.S. Hey you both, what are you talking about? :roll: :? :lol:

Wed Jan 25, 2006 11:47 am

well, we're talking about using the right term of Englisch language in this post.:lol: because I don't know what you both are talking about..:lol:

Thu Jan 26, 2006 3:34 am

victor wrote:
Nite wrote: That is the non-self molecules will trigger an immune response..


I think infected cells will trigger an immune response...am I wrong? :D


not all cell can do immune response. B & T cell occurs in multicellular orgnism, so it is depentdent on what kind of cell you are determined. for unicellular orgnsm, it is have a relationship between its metabolic, regulation, i.e control from the nucleus.

Thu Jan 26, 2006 6:54 am

"not all cell can do immune response"
Cells capable to generate immune response are called immunocompetent cells

"for unicellular orgnsm, it is have a relationship between its metabolic, regulation"
As I already mentioned above, e.g. lectin (extracellular action), phagolysosom vesicle (intracellular action)



...ooh I love Immunology :)

Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:09 am

it's immunobiology boss....:lol:

Thu Jan 26, 2006 11:56 am

Ahaha :D yes and no... The first line is Immunology, the second one is ImmunoBIOlogy. I sometimes keep the "bio" word in my shelf, sorry and thanx :lol: :P

Thu Jan 26, 2006 3:10 pm

Dr.Stein wrote:So lectin has a similar overall function as any PRRs: non-specific recognition of the pathogen.. but only that lectin can help to enhance immune reaction against re-infection of similar pathogens.


Meaning: Higher organisms which have PRRs might have lectin-recognition of pathogen. And lower organisms which have only lectin will not have PRRs, rite?

btw, Dr Stein, in evolutionary immunology, is the immune system divided into the 3 categories like wad Dr Kurtz mentioned in his paper? i.e. Self-non-self recognition, Innate Pathogen Recognition and Acquired Immunity + Memory?

Thu Jan 26, 2006 3:25 pm

Immunology and Immunobiology?? What's the diff?? :oops: :oops:
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