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How do metabolic poisons affect mitochondrial funcitons?

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How do metabolic poisons affect mitochondrial funcitons?

Postby bionerd » Sun Mar 13, 2005 6:18 pm

Hello everyone,
I was in the process of writing a research paper on how metabolic poisons affect mitochondrial functions.

I'm having trouble finding a definition for metabolic poisons..

As well, from what I've seen, such poisons only affect the ETC, are there any other mitochondrial funcitons that are affected by metabolic poisons?

Any help is greatly appreciated
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Postby Poison » Sun Mar 13, 2005 7:06 pm

I don't have any detailed info but as much as I know in general, those poisons inhibits enzyme activity.
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Postby adidasty » Sun Mar 13, 2005 9:40 pm

Poison (no pun intended) is exactly right. Metabolic poisons almost always affect enzymes or protein complexes that will inhibit the electron transport chain which will in turn cease complete metabolism. certain poisonous substances such as CN (cyanide) will affect proteins in the proteins of mitochondrial cristae. other known poisons affect ATP synthase or the ATP synthase complex and halts ATP production at the end of the ETS. H+ buildup occurs and of course everything gets more acidic which denatures other proteins.
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ubiquinone

Postby 2810712 » Wed Mar 16, 2005 1:38 pm

Oh yes adi,
I also remember or probably misremeber of reading that some poisons affect ubiqinone or some of the electron transporters ,
Also, if some ETs contain Fe and S don't the metallic poisons more metallic that Fe alter the structure of that member of ETS, but would this lead to cease of functioning ? ? ?
[because the new metal may take over the function of Fe]
thanx

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Heavy metals

Postby bionerd » Sun Mar 20, 2005 12:37 am

How about heavy metals? I hear they interact with sulfhydril groups in enzymes or something? Does any one know anything about this?
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