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arcella gibosa

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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arcella gibosa

Postby amoebapower » Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:58 pm

i am very fascinated by amoebas, and ive come across a very interesting one. if anyone can give me link to a website anout the amoeba arcella gibosa, please drop me a line . pm me please :wink:
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Postby Ken Ramos » Sun Jan 15, 2006 3:19 am

There are many web sites that contain information on ameba but not one species or genera in general. You may want to visit this one Here :D

Below is an image of Arcella gibbosa at 400x using oblique illumination. Some of the epipodia with which the amoeba attaches itself to the test can be faintly seen, along with other cell inclusions, nucleus and one large vacuole or water expelling vesicle (wev) at the seven o'clock position. :D
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Postby Dr.Stein » Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:41 am

I think Arcella is NOT Amoeba, they are two different species. It is another Sarcodina. So maybe we can say they both "sisters" :)

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Postby Ken Ramos » Tue Jan 17, 2006 12:07 am

These are testate amoebas that are often split into several families or subfamilies because of their difference in form and texture of the test or shell. Locomotion is accomplished by protoplasmic flow or what is called ameboid movement, which is also exhibited in many other protozoa which are not ameba. I could cite many different references as to this amoeba and others which are classified as testate ameba. Yes Arcella belongs to the Phylum Sarcodina, Order Granulopodida, and Family Arcellidae and they are quite diverse and some extreamly beautiful in their species. :D

http://www.pirx.com/droplet/gallery/arcella.html
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