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Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby MrMistery » Fri Mar 11, 2005 8:51 pm

I am almost sure that closing the light means turning it off biostudent. In my language to we have the same word for "to close" and "to turn off"
Regards,
Andrew
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Postby biostudent84 » Sat Mar 12, 2005 12:47 am

Thanks, Andrew...that's what I thought, but you can never be sure.
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Postby 2810712 » Sat Mar 12, 2005 2:14 pm

_at_ chris4
I'm from Bharat, so I didn't know that word, sorry. Thanks, now I know that.
I also drink a cup of milk before I sleep. That's useful ,I think.

My doc. said that the level of serotonin and that 1,5- compound balance each other
So, does 5-HTP fit here???


I have not seen such type of lamp [ sunrise/ set simulator] . Although I get that I would probably not wish to close ,oh sorry, turn it off .

_at_ biostudent84,
LOL- What's that???

Ya, dark/light its quality . But, what's the difference between sensory input affecting the
desire to sleep bet. simply dark and sunset . Atmospheric sensory inputs may also be important. This means that light intensity isn't the only affecting thing .

I also, wonder if zeitgebers are same for all humans and the direction of their action is also the fixed [i.e. favour the sleep or not] then how can there be people active at night???

Also, how does the 'brainclock ' of scientists living in submerged labs under sea for months get maintained ???

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prob.

Postby 2810712 » Sat Mar 12, 2005 2:32 pm

Probably I've got the ans. from the study time discussion.

As MrMistry said , the interpretation of some of sensory inputs of zeitgebers may get
adjusted. It will require atleast a month for us I think. But I don't think that things like stimulation of pineal by optic nerve in light , can be changed. So, its not completely answered. Also, if this is the answer, it only tells that
some people can be owls; but , I think, nobody can be born owl that people claim to be.

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Postby biostudent84 » Sat Mar 12, 2005 6:19 pm

2810713 wrote:I also, wonder if zeitgebers are same for all humans and the direction of their action is also the fixed [i.e. favour the sleep or not] then how can there be people active at night???

Also, how does the 'brainclock ' of scientists living in submerged labs under sea for months get maintained ???
hrushikesh


You're absolutely right. Some people are active at night, rather than during the day...myself included. However, these people, even though active, are operating at a reduced capacity. They are not able to think as straight or coordinate their movements as well as they would if they were active during the day. It's one of those "possible but not recommneded" things.

As for submerged labs, where there is no presence of zeitgebers, the Circadian Rythm (aka "brainclock") is said to become "free running." While their Rythms will roughly follow a one-day schedule, it would be slightly off...but only by a few minutes over or under.

I'll try to make a graph below:

Time of day:
---- is night time, ==== is daytime
(night...)(day...............)(day.....)
----------============----------
Active hours of subsequent days in a Rythm with zeitgebers:
----is inactive hours, ==== is active hours
----------============----------
----------============----------
----------============----------
----------============----------
----------============----------
----------============----------
----------============----------
Active hours of subsequent days in a Free Running Rythm
----------============----------
-----------============---------
------------============--------
-------------============-------
--------------============------
---------------============-----
----------------============----

In the free running system, the time between active/inactive hours remains about the same, there is a slow but steady straying from the normal rythm.
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Oh now I know

Postby 2810712 » Mon Mar 14, 2005 10:50 am

Thnk U V. much biostudent. It cleared my doubts , the graph was cool ! ! !

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