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Morgellon's or ..........flies, or .......

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:37 pm

CREATING AN EFFICIENT DRUG DEVELOPMENT ENGINE IN ASIA

Jonathan Wang, Ph.D., Managing Director, WI Harper Group, San Francisco; Glenn Rice, SRI, Menlo Park, (full title to be inserted); Zhi Wang, (full title to be inserted)
Asia, a “late starter” in biotechnology, is gaining more and more attention from the Western biopharmaceutical companies. There are a number of converging elements which make this emerging market of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry. With its low costs, rapidly growing market, favorable governmental support and high quality inexpensive workforce, Asia could become one of the world’s drug development centers. We will have an overview of these elements and will discuss how to capture the Asian opportunities.
Reduced Costs in Asia
The costs for drug development in Asia are generally much lower than the U.S. and Europe (Fig 1). Today, drug R&D costs are so high in the U.S. that it is hurting the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry. The average cost of developing a new drug in the Western countries has reached $802 million, up from $231 million in 1987, according to a study by Tufts University. A 1994 study at Duke University found that only 30% of marketed drugs had returns higher than the average after-tax R&D costs. The entire U.S. pharmaceutical industry is facing immense cost-cutting pressures.
Due to the high drug development costs, low productivity and drug pricing pressures, the traditional drug development business model is under serious evolutionary pressure. Most venture capital or partnership investments are focusing on the drug candidates at the Phase II clinical trials or later stages. A lack of financing to support the development of a preclinical drug lead or candidate from a research discovery to reach a “fundable” stage with significant clinical data has caused a “Valley of Death,” which is generating a developmental gap and choking translational research. While more and more money is poured into research institutes ($28B from the NIH alone in 2003), the industry’s productivity is decreasing and the drug pipeline is drying up.
FDA compliant drug development in Asia could be the solution for this serious problem. The average cost for pre-clinical development in Singapore is only approximately 50% of that in the U.S. It is even less expensive in Taiwan (40%) and Mainland China (25%). Lower costs would mean more “shots on goal” with the same amount of investment. “Shots on goal” can be defined as the number of drugs in the pipeline or the number of development programs per drug. More “shots on goal” would lead to lower risks for investors.
Government Life Sciences Support and Incentives
Asian governments have put in place attractive incentives to undertake business in their respective countries. These governmental incentives, including tax benefits and grants, have made developing drugs there even more attractive. The Taiwan government has put biotech as one of the two “star industries” which will be a focus for Taiwan. Taiwan’s Knowledge Economy Initiatives is putting NT$150B (approximately USD$5 billion) to jump-start the biotechnology industry there. Singapore regards biomedicine the new pillar of Singapore’s “knowledge-based economy.” The Singapore government is providing grants up to 35% of drug R&D costs to qualified biopharmaceutical companies. China has listed biotech as a top agenda in its 10th Five Year National Development Program. Japan has put life sciences as a top priority in its second Five Year National S&T Program.
As a result of such strong focus on life sciences, the quality of science is increasing at a stunning pace in key Asian countries. One indication of this is that both the quality and quantity of publications from Asia has been growing rapidly.
Asian Pharmaceutical Markets Become More Attractive
Asia is also rapidly becoming an attractive pharmaceutical market. Although today’s pharmaceutical market in Asia (outside of Japan) is only 5% of the global market (Fig. 2), the region’s growth rate is so high that it is rapidly becoming a significant market. Mainland China, with the largest patient population in the world, spent approximately USD$55 billion in healthcare
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Postby Skytroll » Wed Mar 08, 2006 4:14 am

Has anyone seen this or commented on this if did see it?

I wonder about this. Looks like some of the stuff we remove from our arms legs, face.

Strange little fellow, coming out of Chile.

http://www.rense.com/general31/tinyt.htm

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Postby damien james » Wed Mar 08, 2006 7:46 am

Skytroll wrote:Damien James,

There are many aspects to this disease, and since we are not being treated, we do think there are some sinister things going on.

We try to find the natural causes, like worms, flies,
or vectors. But, there seems to be a genetic configuration going on. And I would add too, a biosensor type thing going on.

Many things have been altered and put in wild as biomass, bioremediation, biosynthetic matter.
What we are trying to find is the construct.

On the lymebusters board, under Morgellons we discuss ways to treat, and descriptions of what happens to us.



Yes, I think this is very weird that you are not being treated. What does doctor tell you? MAybe they just don't know how to treat and so do not want to cause harm?

I am having trouble finding exactly what is pathogen. Quorum sensing is said a lot about disease, but this is characteristic of only bacteria. So I assume it is prokaryote. But I am having problem finding analysis results of organism. And culture results. Why is this? Has strain not been isolated yet? I have other questions for later.
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Postby Linn » Wed Mar 08, 2006 7:13 pm

[
damienjames
Yes, I think this is very weird that you are not being treated. What does doctor tell you? MAybe they just don't know how to treat and so do not want to cause harm?

unfortunetly,
many of us are not being treated because the
doctors hear what we say and because it doesnt
fit in to their neat little text book brain
they refuse to even look.

I
am having trouble finding exactly what is pathogen. Quorum sensing is said a lot about disease, but this is characteristic of only bacteria. So I assume it is prokaryote. But I am having problem finding analysis results of organism. And culture results. Why is this? Has strain not been isolated yet? I have other questions for later.
[/quote]

here is some info from one of the doctors
working on the case
of bacteria found thus far:

http://morgellons.org/rwupdate.html

Thank you for your imp :) ut
Lynne
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby London » Thu Mar 09, 2006 11:29 am

Skytroll,

I just saw your strange hyperlink. Maybe this goes with it?

Virus 2: The Real Story of the 'Mir' Threat

By Igor Popov

In a Hollywood blockbuster, the Russian orbital station "Mir," having fallen into the Pacific Ocean, threatens mankind with a terrible virus that it has brought in from the space.

It is interesting that in 2001 a similar chilling plot moved from science fiction to the news. Shortly before the Russian space pride found its last resort in the Pacific waters, both Russian and western media started to scare their readers with the frightening reports about "the Mir danger." The alarm was caused by nothing else but. . . a virus!

To be more precise--viruses. And some other tiny organisms that occupied the station while it carried out its space duty. The character of these creatures was as malicious as the galactic monsters of science fiction.

According to the specialists from the Russian Academic Institute of Micro-Biological Problems, which took part in the Mir space research, the first microorganisms--bacteria and fungi--were found right after the station was placed into the orbit 16 years ago. They were carried on board together with the space cargo. Although both the space shuttles and the cargo had to undergo a thorough anti-bacterial test, complete sterilization was impossible.

Throughout Mir's life in space, the number of microorganisms grew continuously, one generation replacing another every 20-30 minutes. If in 1990 there were registered 94 species, in 2001 they numbered 140. But the real problem was not the species increasing in number but their growing aggressiveness: each new generation seemed to be more ferocious than the last.

Although the people who worked on the station suffered no serious harm (at least, if we believe the Russian Space Committee's official statements), the uninvited guests still gave the cosmonauts a lot of trouble.

Penetrating into every single corner of the station, they showed an enormous appetite and demonstrated their capacity to eat up even highly durable materials. A vivid example of the bacteria's' "outrage" is illustrated by what happened to the window of a transportation spacecraft that docked to Mir when piloted by its last crew. Some time after docking, the cosmonauts' attention was drawn to the rapidly deteriorating window glass. It was covered by a strange film, spreading "as quickly as in the horror movies," and became absolutely non-transparent.

The test results raised the researchers' eyebrows. It turned out the quartz glass and the titan, which framed it, were damaged by a large colony of bacteria. As experts explained later, these microorganisms exuded a metabolism product--an acid so strong that it could easily corrode the window the creatures had settled on.

Besides this case, which rightfully belongs in the microbiology textbooks, the little angry bacteria more than once ate up the metallic casing and destroyed the equipment on board the station. Their next victim was the control panel of a communication device, in which the parasites devoured the whole insulation. When the astronauts Anatoly Solovyev and Pavel Vinogradov sent the device down to the earth, one could see that it was entirely green inside!

These dangerous activities of the Mir microorganisms worried specialists. In the spring of 2001, about a month before it was clear that Mir would come crashing down to Earth, a press representative of Russia's Microbiological Institute Dmitry Malashenkov, in his interview with the newspaper Gazeta.Ru. put it straightforwardly that he did not know how the bacteria would behave after Mir's re-entry. He also confirmed that they posed a danger to the integrity of the station's hull.

Not less alarming were the rumors about 94 kinds of Mir bacteria being pathogenic and able to cause human diseases. This information contradicted claims by Russian scientific authorities. Yet some foreign experts, among them the Italian microbiologist Mario Pizzura, overtly accused the Russians of concealing the outbreaks of infectious diseases among the Mir crews.

In the meantime, unlike the level of threat the bacteria posed to the humans, the reason behind their aggressiveness presently raises no doubt.

Space mutations. Nothing else could change the descendants of the terrestrial microorganisms into sinister "metal eaters." Staying inside the orbital station and on its exterior and being exposed to radioactive space rays and sun flashes, their genetic changes went out-of-control.

Thus, it appeared Mir was attacked by mutes. Just like in another thriller.

But even more intriguing were the revelations of Russian space crewmember Anatoly Serebrov, who confessed that it was not merely microorganisms, which underwent mutations. Several Russian newspapers referred to him saying he had also seen mutating worms. "When one of the station's devices failed and I set to dissembling it, I found there a yellow worm more than a meter long& I have not seen anything of the kind on the Earth," Serebrov said.

On March 23, 2001 the glorious Mir station came to its end. However, the concerns around its mutating creatures have not ended. Scientists fear that once in the ocean, the Mir's changed bacteria may cause (and may have already caused!) negative changes in the Earth biosphere.

These allegations gave rise to a series of sensational news pieces last year. The stories held that, having come into contact with the local terrestrial species, the "space mutes" would start eating plastic, metal and glass and emit poisonous exhalations.

In an effort to claim these apprehensions, skeptics have held that any harmful substances would be burned to a crisp when the Mir fell through the Earth's atmosphere. The "alarmists" still keep saying that, being extremely tenacious of life, the mutes could not be killed by the high temperatures.

Pouring oil on the flames was the comment by the Deputy Director of the Russian Academic Institute of Astronomy, Boris Shustov, who, sharing his opinion with a Gazeta.Ru correspondent, said the high velocity of the falling Mir did not let its temperatures reach the point that microorganisms would start to disintegrate. As an example, the astrophysicist cited the case of a meteorite that fell in India in the mid-1950s. When the locals came upon the site, they saw a huge piece of ice.This would indicate that whatever was inside Mir at re-entry could well be preserved, too, said the scientist.

His colleague from the same academic establishment, Anatoly Mikisha, added that one could hardly make precise temperature calculations concerning each specific part of the station. Mikisha also stressed that there are well-known kinds of bacteria, which can live even in the volcano craters. The temperatures on "Mir" must have been lower, he said.

Anyway, nobody has given a definite answer as to what eventually occurred to the weird inhabitants of the Russian orbital station once it came to rest on the Pacific seabed. The experts merely advised that one should better not try to find the Mir's remains and steer clear from the area where it might be located.

But who knows, maybe one of these days the issue of the Mir mutes will once again make headlines. And in the process make a Hollywood scenario reality.

Copyright © 2002 by Igor Popov



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Igor Popov is a freelance writer based in Moscow, Russia.
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Postby London » Fri Mar 10, 2006 12:03 am

From the Cover: In situ analysis of nitrogen fixation and metabolic switching in unicellular thermophilic cyanobacteria inhabiting hot spring microbial mats.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... ing=f1000m
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Postby London » Fri Mar 10, 2006 12:08 am

I know this has to be part of Morgellons...the zinc finger.......

TamTam, you around, we'd love to hear from you!
************************

FILAMENTOUS FLOWER, a meristem and organ identity gene of Arabidopsis, encodes a protein with a zinc finger and HMG-related domains



http://www.genesdev.org/cgi/content/full/13/9/1079#SEC2


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Postby London » Fri Mar 10, 2006 12:27 am

Coupling of Human -Opioid Receptor to Retinal Rod Transducin in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells1

http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/conte ... /292/1/209

London

PS: Mr. Jurvetson, it's Fiber Weekend .....starting tomorrow + a lil show & tell about that underwater Plane you were riding in!
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Morgellons

Postby Skytroll » Fri Mar 10, 2006 12:31 am

Damien James,

Here is a snip from http://www.morgellons.org site...

"1) Two primary types of bacteria have been cultured from skins samples of multiple Morgellons patients. The bacteria are of two types; a chain or 2-4 rod-shaped bacilli and tiny, spherical, cocci/diplococci. On solid media the cocci make a hard membrane-like coating over the colony. The liquid culture of bacilli usually contains a very stringy material after a few days of culturing. Some macroscopic fibers have appeared in these cultures, but it is unclear where they are coming from. We are trying to determine whether they are environmental contaminants or a product of the bacteria. It is also possible that the long fibers are nothing more than DNA from the dead bacteria. We are currently performing PCR (to amplify the microbial DNA) and DNA sequence analysis of both of these isolated bacteria."

They go on to say that it does not appear to have a flagella.

I think some doctors do not know how to treat, but, majority seem to not want to deal with it, as Linn says, because it is not in the books, but,
to I would think they should investigate it, and they won't. We are told we think we have parasites, called EKBOM diagnosis, which means have delusional parasitosis.

These are very real sores, lesions, and the fibers are present, black, blue, red, sometimes pink, white and clear colors.

We have fibromyalgia type pain in certain areas, have these in our hair, sometimes causes hair to fall out. We have swellings, and lots of pain with these. Sometimes, it feels like the fibers are wrapping around the nerves and destroying them, and it is extremely painful.

We have chronic fatigue too. Brain fog etc. Vertigo. Some of us have had Bells Palsy, which could also be Lyme Disease related.

Hope this gives you some info on our plight.

London,
great article "From Russia with Love" heh? You know, the above description from Morgellons sounds like those buggers they encountered.

Hey, I have wondered about that Aradopsis plant too, they did alter the genes in that and sent it out into the wild.

Got ladybugs hatching in my house. Course, snow is melting and we have rain, time for the spring stuff to happen up here in the North.

Zinc finger.......ahhhhhhhh. Will look in my garden this year and see what the wind blew in this time. Been finding strange flowers in my normal flower beds. mmmmmmmmm.......

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Postby Linn » Fri Mar 10, 2006 2:18 am

Sky,
thats freaky. :shock:
do you think they are telling
the truth that it was alive when they found it?
maybe its a miscarried fetus or something.

There are strange things in heaven and earth!!!

BTW
so you had found that same collembolla
larvae on you?
I wonder how many others have the same kind,
may be a type of collembolla parasitizing humans now.

I think maybe if so we can classify collembolla
definite as a vector,
I am going to see what mites are found on collembolla.

Later,
Lynne :)
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby Linn » Fri Mar 10, 2006 3:25 am

Ok
london, sky and all,
this looks like a good one to print
and read with a cup of tea:http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/41638/Fumigation.pdf

This link looks good and sneaky :twisted:
I got tired of waiting for it to download perhaps
someone else can take a look
I bookmarked it for now.
Something about final alarm from the
goverment and involving collembolla:

http://www.ogtr.gov.au/rtf/ir/dir008finalrarmpa.rtf

PLEASE let me know what you think of and
it means anything for us.
:)

Still searching for collembolla mites. :)
but does any one want to try to read this article?
the text is very tiny, but it looks significant:
Page 232 Collembolla, 20000–24000 (Ravlin 1996b); Diplura, 1647
(Ravlin 1996a); ... parasitizing 97% of adult female nematodes in
suppressive soils; ...

Regards,
Lynne
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby London » Fri Mar 10, 2006 7:02 am

Lynne, I will look tomorrow and get back w/ you. (It's late now)
*************************

Public release date: 12-May-2004
[ Print Article | E-mail Article | Close Window ]

Contact: Kerry Murphy
kerry.murphy@tufts.edu
617-627-4317
Tufts University

Tufts University groundbreaking research on caterpillar locomotion
Tufts University groundbreaking research on caterpillar locomotion could pave the way to designing first flexible robot to navigate through human body, pipelines, reactors
MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. –Tufts University neurobiologist Barry Trimmer is inching his way to unlocking the secrets behind the way caterpillars maneuver and climb, and is using that knowledge to one day build flexible robots that could explore internal organs, blood vessels and the insides of pipelines.
Trimmer recently received his third National Science Foundation grant, totaling nearly $1 million to date, to support this research.

An associate professor of biology in the School of Arts and Sciences at Tufts with expertise in cellular biology and neurophysiology, Trimmer has appointments in biomedical engineering at Tufts' School of Engineering and in neurosciences at Tufts' Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences.

"We are trying to understand how the nervous system controls these complex movements so we can replicate that movement and build our own soft-bodied robots that maneuver easily, like a caterpillar," Trimmer said.

He added, "Our research has potential applications in the design and control of a new type of flexible robot that could be used to navigate through pipelines or intricate structures such as blood vessels and air tubes, as well as space shuttle operations and building construction."

Trimmer's lab is believed to be the only one of its kind to focus on the locomotion of soft-bodied insects, specifically the nervous system and how it works with the biomechanics of the caterpillar. (There are many biologists and engineers that study animals with skeletons and joints with a goal of building jointed, but not flexible robots.)

Two specific aspects of the caterpillar's movement are being examined in detail: first, the research is trying to understand how crawling is controlled by the central nervous system and how it interacts with peripheral structures such as muscles and cuticles. Second, the unique ability of caterpillars to climb using curved hooks at the tips of the abdominal prolegs is being examined. This gripping is passive but very strong (similar to Velcro hooks) and can be actively released.

To examine these questions, Trimmer and his research team are using 3D kinematics, electromyography, hydraulic measurements, magnetic resonance imaging, 3D modeling and animation and biomaterials testing.

Caterpillars provide a useful survival model: They do not escape predators by running but instead use camouflage, chemical defenses and cryptic behavior. As a result, their movement – crawling – has evolved into a highly specialized form of locomotion which allows soft-bodied animals to crumple, compress and rotate body parts into confined three-dimensional structures such as tubes and branches.

Trimmer is working with Tufts colleagues across the University in physics, mathematics and mechanical engineering, and often employs undergraduate researchers as well. The majority of the knowledge about how humans move is based on research about creatures that walk, fly or swim using hard bones and exoskeletons (a hard outer structure that provides protection or support). By looking at soft bodied animals like the caterpillar, Trimmer can copy some of the unique ways in which they move.

This summer, the team will begin to design a physics-based computerized simulation model of the locomotion, and it hopes to have an operating prototype ready next year.

"We need to solve the artificial muscle problem first, currently there are no good soft actuators (motors) available," according to Trimmer.

"Professor Trimmer is a trailblazer in the field of biosystems and neural processes," said Susan Ernst, a biologist and dean of the School of Arts & Sciences. "His work could help scientists and engineers around the world navigate complex and even dangerous situations."

Trimmer – who is from Leicestershire County, England, and has been at Tufts since 1990 – has presented his work on the neural control of soft-bodied locomotion at several meetings over the past two years, including the British Biochemical Society, the East Coast Nerve Net meeting, the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, and the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology's annual meeting.

For more information on Trimmer and other neural processes work being done in his lab, see: http://ase.tufts.edu/biology/faculty/trimmer/.


###
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