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Morgellon's or ..........flies, or .......

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Tue Feb 21, 2006 4:18 am

I'm trying to find out if indeed I'm on the right track. Maybe if I post it
I could find out .

Are you asking me to post the particulars ( articles) in reference to
Salmonella and E. coli? If so,

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articl ... rtid=99021

and:

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articl ... tid=107006

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Postby London » Tue Feb 21, 2006 8:48 am

**Patrick,
I certainly hope it is okay to post this. I would certainly be happy
to hear from you more. We ( most of us posters) are just everday people
with no background in any Science field; in particular Microbiology. Someone has given out hints to what might be the cause of the heinous
disease I suffer from: Morgellons. I am, and have been following
these leads. Your feedback is appreciated.

Sincerely,

London

Transfer of DNA

In conjugative transfer, DNA passes along a tube that links two bacteria, which may occur
between bacteria of the same or similar species. Plasmids carrying genes as transposable
elements (transposons) may transfer between cells. Those carrying more than one
transposon can encode resistance to many, chemically unrelated, antibacterials.
Transformation involves the uptake of DNA from the environment. DNA acquired by this
process may come from an unrelated species, and antibacterial resistance may be
acquired even from species not usually responsible for causing disease.
Transduction involves the transfer of DNA by a bacteriophage.
Prion domains: sequences, structures and interactions.
*************************
Prion domains: sequences, structures and interactions.

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Genetics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0830, USA. wickner@helix.nih.gov

Mammalian and most fungal infectious proteins (also known as prions) are self-propagating amyloid, a filamentous beta-sheet structure. A prion domain determines the infectious properties of a protein by forming the core of the amyloid. We compare the properties of known prion domains and their interactions with the remainder of the protein and with chaperones. Ure2p and Sup35p, two yeast prion proteins, can still form prions when the prion domains are shuffled, indicating a parallel in-register beta-sheet structure
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum

Prions: proteins as genes and infectious entities ; see:
http://www.genesdev.org/cgi/content/full/18/5/470

*****************************
DNA methylation-dependent regulation of pef expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... s=10692151
*********************************
Synthetic Mammalian Prions
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/a ... 5/5684/673
*********************************
Below is something I found via the internet around Christmas time, but until these last few days I have not been able to see where it fit into anything. Now I do.

The following is a website by the name of a man called
Stephen T. Abedon. He used to work at the University of Arizona
and now works for Ohio State University. His interest lies in
phage ecological, particularly phage adaptation to growth limitat-
ions imposed by environments. http://www.bacteriophage.org

I think the bacteriophage, in particular T-4 fits into what is
plagueing us. I am hoping that the role of CD4-positive T cells in
Bacterial Killing will help us fight this.

Here is something on the T-4:

Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods.

http://mmbr.asm.org/cgi/content/full/67/1/86

I think believe what TamTam speaks of may indeed be:

LYsophospholipase_carboxylesterase, but I do
know if this is correct.

Sincerely just trying to find an answer,

London
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Postby Cilla » Wed Feb 22, 2006 3:55 pm

Hi Tam tam,

As well as wishing to know how exactly this infection and infestation possibly causes something similar to the neurogenic bladder, and similar to amylotrophic lateral sclerosis, how precisely might it also lead to chorioretinitis?
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Postby Linn » Wed Feb 22, 2006 5:15 pm

Excerpt from the Morgellons foundation from Randy(Dr. Wymore)
What we have so far about the type of bacteria.
In case no one reads the updates:

"1) Two primary types of bacteria have been
cultured from skins samples of multiple Morgellons patients.
The bacteria are of two types;
a chain or 2-4 rod-shaped bacilli
and tiny, spherical, cocci/diplococci.
On solid media the cocci make a hard membrane-like "

These are some of the FACTS that they DO have so far.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby tamtam » Wed Feb 22, 2006 10:12 pm

errata:
chorioretinitis like I should have written.

Infestation of the vitreous with in density increasing
strands of (foreign) protein.
Not directly to associate with retinal lesions
But with vitreous floaters/ blurring, Ritters like.

Neurogenic bladder, like irritable bowel syndrome.
Disturbed motility

I kow there exist a connection with epithelial cell.
Quorum sensing/ vacuole/ exfoliative

Fact is that the micro organism seems to cause arrest of function.

Inhibition of (pain) signal?

That many people report to experience peripheral neuropathy could maybe also link this pathogen to
diabetes.

I expect a link with the neurotoxic properties of cyano.

But remember: prove looks different.

The pathogen has been isolated and I hope all association will become established.



Step for step.

Sincerely,

tamtam
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Postby Linn » Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:23 pm

"On solid media the cocci make a hard membrane-like coating over the colony. The liquid culture of bacilli usually contains a very stringy material after a few days of culturing. Some macroscopic fibers have appeared in these cultures, but it is unclear where they are coming from. We are trying to determine whether they are environmental contaminants or a product of the bacteria. It is also possible that the long fibers are nothing more than DNA from the dead bacteria. We are currently performing PCR (to amplify the microbial DNA) and DNA sequence analysis of both of these isolated bacteria. These results should be available by the end of September or early October. "
-Dr. wymore
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby London » Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:33 pm

Hi Tam Tam,

Thanks for the information. Over the last couple of months,
as I have followed your clues, I have had answers come up
as Diabetes. But a lot of other diseases as well. Ranging
anywhere from Cancer - Alzheimers.

I just hope it is not any of them. Hey I saw the poster abstracts
from the 2004 workshop held in Argentina. I read at least three
on Trypansoma/Chagas Disease.

Just curious, are you from South America? I know you have great interest
there and for getting knowledge of this to their culture.

I ask simply out of curiosity.

So now we should add Toxiplasmosis into equation? (Staph, Toxi,
Proth Wickerhami, Frog skin disease......oh I don't wantto know anymore....... :0

I Have been studying the Flea being involved. And I have found the importance of the moth's wingpattern.
Are we going to also be studying the eye and the light/dark controls
it's being.? Again, Just wondering.

Thank you,

London
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Postby Linn » Fri Feb 24, 2006 2:31 am

2)" As mentioned above, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.has been mentioned as a candidate, causative bacterium in Morgellons Disease. Amplification of DNA from the bacterial population isolated from the skin, scabs and shed material of the Morgellons patients and sequencing is still incomplete, although it will hopefully be completed during the next month or so. Bacterial isolates cultured from skin samples from four Morgellons patients residing in climatologically and geographically distinct areas of the United States have revealed no evidence of S. maltophilia thus far. Based on published reports, when S. maltophilia is cultured on blood agar plates there is a distinct flagellum (or multiple flagella) that is visible on the rod-shaped bacteria (bacilli). The bacilli that we have observed do not appear to be flagellated and are much longer than we would have expected for the characterized and published strains of S. maltophilia. They are also clustered in ways that do not look like the published images of S. maltophilia. DNA sequencing will give provide an answer as to whether this bacillus is present in Morgellons patients or not. "
-Dr Wymore
morgellons.org
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby London » Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:27 am

HERE YOU GO, THIS IS A PERFECT E XAMPLE OF THE IMPORTANCE

OF THE EYE:

http://www.cirs.net/indexenglish.htm

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Postby Linn » Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:03 pm

Although I have not found any collembola on me,
some are reporting them as a vector.

More from Dr. Wymore
morgellons.org:

3) The putative role of the arthropod Collembola
in Morgellons disease.
The paper by Altschuler, et al.,
(J. New York Entomol. Soc. 112(1):87–95, 2004)
entitled, COLLEMBOLA (SPRINGTAILS) (ARTHROPODA:
HEXAPODA: ENTOGNATHA) FOUND IN SCRAPINGS
FROM INDIVIDUALS DIAGNOSED WITH DELUSORY
PARASITOSIS, described evidence of Collembola
in patients with symptoms resembling Morgellons
disease. We decided to look at the molecular level
for DNA evidence of Collembola in samples of skin,
scabs and other shed material from Morgellons patients.
To do this, PCR primers were synthesized that
would amplify DNA from the cytochrome oxidase
II gene from any of the 20 families and over 1,000
species of Collembola (Frati, et al., Evolution of the
mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene in
Collembola, J. Mol. Evol., 1997).
The PCR primers are designed as follows,
as per the Frati, et al. paper:
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby Skytroll » Sun Feb 26, 2006 2:24 pm

Maggie mae,

Glad to see someone else thinking along these same lines. Ive been looking at this quite a while now.

Also, here is a rotor motor.

Might find this interesting.

http://www.fbs.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/seminar/09a.html

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Postby Linn » Mon Feb 27, 2006 12:41 am

This is the info from Maggie mae that skytroll is refering to:

"Fellow investigators

I have been thoroughly researching all Dr. Martin's information in all his work printed. I have come to the conclusion that what we have is in fact some type of biosensor being manufactured by our own bodies. I am including sites that I have found evidence of same...any comments?
Mm

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pi ... biosensors
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... biosensors
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... biosensors
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=le ... nt&spell=1
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... s+research
There are many books out now that show how the body can create these little sensors - sounds more reasonable to me than most anything else."
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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