Login

Join for Free!
118352 members


Morgellon's or ..........flies, or .......

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

Moderator: BioTeam

Postby Ken Ramos » Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:13 am

Southcity asked:

that is a really good picture!!! do you have any more? can you tell us where you found it?


I have maybe two or three more of Springtails. Did you know there are approx. 6000 different species of them! I only thought there were but a few. :roll: Anyway that particular fellow was found among the leaves of some moss that I had collected from the backyard after a rain.

The image was taken utilizing a Meiji (may-gee) EMZ-13TR stereomicroscope equipped with a Sony DSC-W5, 5 megapixel digital camera attached above the photo tube of the microscope. This photo tube contains a WF 10X 18mm eyepiece which is used as the relay lens. :D

BTW just some trivia, the word "Meiji" means "enlightenment" and was also once the name of Japans emporer. :D
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
Ken Ramos
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 10:30 am
Location: Western North Carolina

Postby London » Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:44 am

Will not post much I believe I just read where it will be deleted anyway,

but if you indeed do see this, know that there is an answer for it. Yes

indeed, w/out a doubt. Don't know about cure/panacea yet due to lack

of reading about it. Since I have not been posting too much it gave me time

to go back and read some of my older research. Believe it or not I found

the one I'm referring too on New Years Day. I tell you this because I do not recall or not if I posted anthing about it on Jan. 1st or after.

Possibly so.

JJIll and Skytrol:

Wire problem/issue was solved ( for $800 bucks :( , the cause

of problem was the biggest relief of my life.....Squirrels!!! Absolutely

positve.

PS Hi Randy and Lynn

London ( oh and.....I'm def. still reading up on the above and note:
there is indeed different versions of it)


London
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Postby RANDY » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:34 am

MOST , ALMOST ALL DISEASES OF THE SKIN HAVE KERATOTIC PLUGS.

DO A SEARCH AND YOU WILL SEE.

JUST ME RESEARCHING WHAT IS BEING TOLD TO US. SHOOT ME IF YOU MUST.

Pathophysiology: The classic lesion of LS is a keratotic plug located within the dilated follicular orifice. Histologically, an inflammatory lymphohistiocytic infiltrate occurs around the follicle and in the dermis. Hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, and acanthosis are visible in the follicle. Differentiating LS from keratosis pilaris by microscopy may not be possible.
A 26-year-old woman developed 249 discrete papules on her lower extremities. Twenty-three of them had keratotic plugs. Histologic examination demonstrated granulomatous foci consisting of epithelioid cells and a epidermal invagination which was disrupted at the base and lateral sites. This invagination was considered to represent transepithelial elimination.


ANOTHER:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... t=Abstract


ANOTHER:
A 4-year-old girl presented with a 3-year history of demarcated, salmon-pink, hyperkeratotic plaques, which were symmetrically distributed on the elbows, knees, ankles, and dorsal aspects of the hands and feet. A diffuse, orange-pink palmoplantar keratoderma was also evident. Clinical and histologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP), type IV (circumscribed juvenile). Type IV PRP develops in prepubertal children, is typically localized to the distal aspects of the extremities, and has an unpredictable course. Although ultraviolet (UV) radiation can potentially exacerbate PRP, our patient has improved with broad-band UVB phototherapy.

http://dermatology.cdlib.org/114/NYU/NY ... 17056.html

LAST ONE:

Case Report
A 78-year-old woman of Polish origin presented in January 1998 with a six year history of a warty dermatosis localized on the thighs, upper limbs, abdomen and upper back (Figure 1). Face, palms and soles were spared as were mucous membranes, hair and nails. The asymptomatic dermatosis consisted of many firm red or brown papules, with a rough keratotic surface. The surrounding skin appeared normal. In the beginning, these papules were well individualized and presented in a linear distribution, especially on the thighs.

ALL DERMITOLOGICAL CONDITIONS HAVE KERATOTIC PLUGS OF SOME SORT.

EDUCATED, NON ANGRY COMMENTS WELCOME.



ANOTHER:


ANOTHER DISEASE WITH THIS:

Histopathologically, LSA shows hyperkeratosis with keratotic plugging of follicles, atrophy of the stratum malpighii with hydropic degeneration of the basal cells, atrophy and homogenization of the upper dermal collagen and an infiltrate in he mid-dermis (7). Apart from the natural absence of hair follicles on the penis, BXO shows a similar picture
During the End Times, Good will battle Evil. Where do you stand?
http://unknownskindisease.com
User avatar
RANDY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 882
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2006 8:16 am


Postby RANDY » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:43 am

During the End Times, Good will battle Evil. Where do you stand?
http://unknownskindisease.com
User avatar
RANDY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 882
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2006 8:16 am

Sorry to spoil your parade, but that is NOT a Collembola

Postby drmicrobe » Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:06 pm

Ken Ramos, I'm sorry to spoil your parade, but that is NOT a Collembola. That is a woolly aphid (Family Eriosomatidae) and the so called fibers are just a waxy substance secreted from their skin which helps to camouflage them. It is easy to destinguish this as an aphid as it has a siphon and is sucking from the plant and has more than 4-6 abdominal body segments. Plus if you collect some of these and look at them under a microscope you will see it does NOT have a furcula nor water tube protruding from its abdomen. Generally eriosomatids have both a bisexual and asexual stage with tiny females laying only one egg. The females can produce several generations without fertilization and have thick, woolly or waxy coverings during nymphal stage. Other species of aphids are parthenogenic and may be seen under a microscope to have many small aphids developing inside their bodies. There goes your new species and all these myths people are promoting regarding Collembola that infect them with fibers. Many insects of this order make wax like fibers. If you want to learn about Collembola and other insects, I suggest you take a college level entomology course and at least get a field guide to learn how to properly identify the different orders and families of insects. Plus read up and study hard. If you want to learn about Collembola I suggest you obtain some known species and learn to rear them. This is also a good way to learn about any type of insect. If you begin your studies with know species you will know what you have to begin with. Also this applies to other microbes. Order or obtain known, non-disease species. You can also get known species of insects from universities that have an Entomology Department or do agricultural research.
I have over 37 years experience studying insects and microbes and certainly know a wooly aphid when I seen one! Plus Collembola generally feast upon fungi. But don't let this discourage you. If you take the time to learn how to identify Collembola and make an effort to collect Collembola and submit them to experts, sooner or later you will find a new species. There are more unknow species of Collembola than known species. So this represents a great opportunity! Have at it!
Last edited by drmicrobe on Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
drmicrobe
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 11:21 am

Postby Ken Ramos » Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:26 pm

Well I am not presently looking for a new species of anything at the moment and as for Springtails, if you note, I said that I did not think that they were the causative agent of the infection so many are debating about. As for a new speices of anything, maybe I should have stated that the possibiltiy of finding any particular one may exist. :wink:

As for "raining on my parade?" I have an umbrella, sir/madam. It happens all the time. :lol: As for your 37 years in the study of insects and microbes, that is quite impressive. Most of my life has been spent serving my/our country in various parts of the world. Have you researched any on pathogenic ameba? I find them to be quite interesting, especially the infections such as GAE and PAM, which are caused by these ameba. :D
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
Ken Ramos
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 10:30 am
Location: Western North Carolina

Postby Linn » Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:45 pm

Ken,

Have to run to work
got a comment for this one later..
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby Ken Ramos » Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:10 pm

Well I hope you have had a good day Lynne, because by the time you will have probably read this, you are now back home. :lol: I looked up the Woolly Aphid and according to the US Dept. of Agriculture and Forest service:
True firs are the only known host of the woolly aphid and few, if any are resistant to infestation.

http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/nr/fid/fidls/fidl118.htm

Not that it matters of course, I found mine in a clump of lowly moss. :roll:
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
Ken Ramos
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 10:30 am
Location: Western North Carolina

Postby Poison » Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:08 pm

yyz wrote:Poison,

The disease is complex enough to warrant several discussion threads.

That shouldn't be too much to ask considering topics such as cheese sandwiches, mcdonalds, and help me with my homework questions are allowed to flourish here.

Thanks,
yyz


There are many complex diseases, morgellons is not the only one.
Those topics are about different things. If the same things are asked again and again we direct the user to make a search. I know this disease is complex too, but note that we are here to keep this forum clean. Even one thread caused TOO much trouble. We are still struggling to save some info from that topic which turned into a rubbish a while ago. You can use one topic to discuss things too. We will think of leaving another one. But never more than 2. Please try to understand us. Thanks.
Regards,

Poison
It matters not how strait the gate
How charged with punishment the scroll
I am the Master of my fate
I am the Captain of my soul.
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby yyz » Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:59 pm

Poison,

Thank you for your response. I know what you are saying.


Also, does anyone know if pee is safe to drink? Oops... nevermind... I just saw that thread. I am going to go read it right away, then I will know. :D

yyz
yyz
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 6:39 pm

Postby Linn » Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:40 pm

Ok Ken, lunch breaak peek :lol:

quote:drmicrobe

"Ken Ramos, I'm sorry to spoil your parade, but that is NOT a Collembola. That is a woolly aphid (Family Eriosomatidae) and the so called fibers are just a waxy substance secreted from their "

Thats not nice :(
Somewhere in these forums
someone posted a link with a gallery of collombola and i believe Kens photo does look like that. A strange blue colored one.

I am not an expert on collombola but that doesnt look like any aphid I have ever met :?: :?: :?:

And ken,
do you mean wooly adelgid? Those bad boys have decimated entire forrest of Canadian hemlock Trees. :twisted:

I have to check my trees all the time and watch that i dont get that.

THere has been talk also in the hort trade about responsibility of selling hemlocks. Plant ethics :lol: The merchent should educate the buyer before they purchase.

Use any the following keywords and see if thats your bug

Apterygota ( Collombolla) AKA Springtails;
Taxonavigation:

Subregnum:Metazoa
Superphylum: Bilateria: Prtostomia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Classis: Insecta
Subclassis: Apterygota
[b]Ordo: ThysanurArchaeognatha
[/b] Hope this helps you both.
I will get back to you later.

The person who posted that web cite on the collombola is a morgellons/fiber poster, and I dont remember who posted it, so by chance would you re-post and then I dont have to go back and look for it :( later gator
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby Ken Ramos » Sat Feb 18, 2006 12:02 am

Lynne said:

I am not an expert on collombola but that doesnt look like any aphid I have ever met


Well I am not an expert either Lynne. :lol: I made my identification from various websites that address the little buggers. One of them was a Collembola website but I can't recall off hand which one.

Looks as though my photograph really got someones "knickers in a twist" though. :lol: I really don't do any hard research on anything. My interests are much to varied to persue a set course. I find something while using my scopes, I photograph it, look around the internet or in some of my books to see what it may be and if I find a match from a photograph or a really good sketch, that is what I go by. :D Took a photograph of myself once. Found a match on a "primates web page!" :o
Ken Ramos, Aviation Ordnanceman USN Ret.
Western North Carolina
"If you see an explosives handler running...try to keep up with him!"
Ken's Nature Study
Ken Ramos
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 10:30 am
Location: Western North Carolina

PreviousNext

Return to Human Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests