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Parkinsons disease

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Parkinsons disease

Postby Ilyaas » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:05 pm

Hi everyone

This disease which i have little knowledge about happens because sufferers dont produce the neurotransmitter dopamine (i think). However, if anyone could fill me in on the details of the disease i would appreciate it. Another thing i wanted to mention which i need help on was that in France they cured this disease by an operation on the head, if anyone could explain how it is cured through such an operation ?
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Postby toonx » Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:33 am

I think an operation is not very good,its very dangerous .when you have no choice ,U have to take an operation !
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Dec 04, 2005 11:20 am

Well parkinson syndrom is a degeneration of the caudate and lentiform nucleus and then the whole extrapiramidal systems and... that's about i know...
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Postby Ilyaas » Sun Dec 04, 2005 9:05 pm

caudate and lentiform nucleus

Are u referring to the nucleues of the neurones in the brain?
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Postby victor » Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:28 pm

L-dopa or the famous name of L-dihydroxyalanine is prduced in the adrenal gland at medulla part from the precursor molecule of Tyrosine. Later L-dopa will be transferred become dopamine, then norephinephrine and the last is ephinephrine.
The distribution of this hormone (dopamine) can't reach to the brain tissues because of some special layers located arout that location, so the alternative is, our brain cells also can produce Dopamine as neurotransmitter there....in Parkinson syndrome, there're two possibility that can cause that. one is the dopamine secretion get inhibited and the second is the transferation from tyrosin to opamine also get inhibited by some molecular substances....(I will find it for you he details).

Well, that's what I know...
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A: They have all the solutions.
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i can tell u that i av jus dun it in a lesson!!!!!!!

Postby ness8917 » Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:01 pm

Parkinson’s disease affects the brain, specifically the basal ganglia, which are nerve cell clusters and it controls movement, to carry out this they need to have dopamine which is released by the Substantia nigra. In this disease the substantia nigra is damaged, this means that the dopamine is not released, a loss in it. This disease results in trembling, stiffness in the muscles and walking, speech and facial expressions get deformed.


there u go, du u know anythin bout mine?

:!: :lol: :D :) :wink: :P
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Postby Ilyaas » Tue Dec 06, 2005 10:23 am

How is the substantia nigra damaged?
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