Login

Join for Free!
112462 members


Chemotherapy and its affect on cells

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

Moderator: BioTeam

Chemotherapy and its affect on cells

Postby tclette » Sat Mar 05, 2005 4:35 am

How does chemotherapy and radiation affect healthy cells? I know that cancer cells divide out of control. Side effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy that fight cancers include loss of hair and of the gastrointestinal lining, producing severe nausea. Note that cells in hair follicles and intestinal lining divide frequently.
Does the fact that cancer cells, hair follicle cells, and cells of the gastrointestinal lining divide frequently actually cause radiationtherapy and chemotherapy to destroy these health cells as well as the cancer cells?
If this is so, is there some way to improve cancer therapy without harming healthy cells?
tclette
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2005 4:30 am

Postby Poison » Sat Mar 05, 2005 1:48 pm

Chemotherapy and radiation effects normal cells as well as cancer cells. It does harm, as you know. Researchers are trying to find better ways to control cancer. as much as I know giving radiation to a limited section is a one of them. for example: in some of the brain tumors. (but it doesnt work for all.)
Do you have any idea about how not to harm healthy cells?
It matters not how strait the gate
How charged with punishment the scroll
I am the Master of my fate
I am the Captain of my soul.
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby mith » Sun Mar 06, 2005 1:00 am

Lol, i'm a geek, when I read this I immediately thought of the different magic attack in d&d games but anyway


The chemotherapy basically floods the whole body hoping that since there are more healthy cells, they would be the survivors. To lessen the damage, 2 things can be done. You can develop better targeting, such as using a laser or maybe really tiny fragments of radioactive isotopes. Another way is to have some way to repair the damage.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN


Postby ewokgod » Tue May 17, 2005 11:50 pm

cant we use antibiotics such as rubidomycin to treat cancerous cells:?:
ewokgod
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:59 am
Location: grim and frostbitten yeti forest

Postby mith » Wed May 18, 2005 12:01 am

No because antibiotics attack bacteria, cancerous cells usually still exhibit the same signal(surface) proteins as one of your normal cells.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby Jelanen » Wed May 18, 2005 1:13 am

Another thing is that cancer cells are rapidly dividing cells and rapidly dividing cells are more susceptible to radiation and chemical damage than other cells. Not much more though...

-Jelanen
Jelanen
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 218
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 1:00 am
Location: The Lab

Postby ewokgod » Wed May 18, 2005 11:45 am

i see. is this why people who are exposed to radiation or chemotherapy damaged their bone marrows. thus their immune system fail?
ewokgod
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:59 am
Location: grim and frostbitten yeti forest


Return to Cell Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron