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What happens to red blood cells in hypotonic solution

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What happens to red blood cells in hypotonic solution

Postby Golshani » Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:37 am

Just wanted to discuss what happens to red blood cells in a hypotonic solution.

Thank you
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Postby chicoguardian » Wed Nov 23, 2005 1:03 pm

What Happens to a cell in a hypotonic solution. This is what happens: since the cell is in the liquids in your body that has lower concentration. the water will leave the cell to try and make the concentration equal both within the cell and outside the cell. That is basically what happens. hope that helped :wink:
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Postby victor » Wed Nov 23, 2005 1:10 pm

Hm, outside RBC is insteretisiil area filled with plasma [albumin, globulin, fibrinogen, water and some ions]. with the presence of protein in the interestisiil area, the osmotic level compared to the inside RBC is the same...so there's no water molecules that's "trying as hard as they can" to balance the water level, but the osmotic pressure and hydrostatic level do..
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Postby MrMistery » Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:53 pm

I think the main idea is "what would happen if you were to put in a hypothonic solution".
Well, water would enter the cell via osmosis, and make it burst. In case you didn't know, the cell membrane from the red blood cell membrane was the first membrane isolated, and it was done using such an osmotic shock
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Postby siya » Thu Nov 24, 2005 2:14 pm

when rbc is placed in hypertonic sol. water molecules enter the cell by osmosis to regulate the conc. on both sides.thus the cell swells up.in exteme case it wud burst.tthis is controlled thro' osmoregulation. :wink:
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Postby MrMistery » Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:45 pm

Can you do a calculation of what salt concentration water needs to have for the rbc to swell up but not burst. it would something like 1 pM less than the one inside the erytrocyte. i don't think that solution can obtained through easy processes, so if you do put it into a standard hypotonic solution(ex:distilled water) it will burst. and this is not an extreme case, it is a regular experimental case.
By the way, i believe you meant "hypotonic" not "hypertonic"

Did anyone notice there are many osmosis questions on the forum lately?
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Postby deenteen » Thu Nov 24, 2005 8:41 pm

[color=blue]in a hypotonic solution a cell will swell because there is more solution/pressure inside the cell than outside. eventually the cell will burst.[/color]
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