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Vacuole

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Vacuole

Postby Sinead Ryan » Mon Feb 28, 2005 2:26 pm

Why does an animal cell contain a contractile vacuole and a plant cell contains a non-contactile vacuole???
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Postby Poison » Mon Feb 28, 2005 5:16 pm

correct me if im wrong. Animal cells do not have cell wall. And can burst if too much water entrance occurs. But in plant cells there is cell wall and gives the cell strength.
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Postby Sinead Ryan » Mon Feb 28, 2005 5:23 pm

so by using the micro fibres to contract the vacuole to rid the cell of water they vacuole prevents the cell from bursting??? how then does a vacuole in a plant cell ged rid of excess water??
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Hope this helps

Postby MrMistery » Fri Mar 04, 2005 10:07 pm

first of all, both plant and animal cells contain non-contractile vacuoles. They are the way cells store certain stuff(like glucose in the orange fruit). The contractile vacuola is just a certain type of vacuola.
Now, how does the plant get rid of exces water. There are 2 ways:the most important is perspiration-eliminating water under the form of vapors. At night, when there is no prespiration the plant eliminates water under the form of drops. Both proceses take place mostly in leaves, but not only there. It is said that 99% of the water absorbed through the root is then lost through one of these processes.
Hope this helpes
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Postby mith » Fri Mar 04, 2005 10:50 pm

@MrMistery
I believe he was referring to the cell and not the whole plant.
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Mar 05, 2005 10:27 pm

Yeap, u r right. Sorry, i didn't c that because i was very tired.
From what i know the process is simple. The vacuole reaches the membrane through the cytoplasmatic curents and then joines it's membrane with the celular membrane, thus eliminating it's content on the outside. the liquit still has to cross the celular wall. This not does usually happen, but not never. Sometimes, the cellular wall is fractured, also even through an unfractured wall water can pass(very hard and very slowly).
I am not sure of this process, plants aren't really my thing. Please correct me if I am wrong.
PS: not all vacuoles eliminate their content. Some are for permanent storage
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Postby mith » Sun Mar 06, 2005 12:57 am

sounds like exocytosis, verification anyone?
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Postby thank.darwin » Sun Mar 06, 2005 4:01 am

What sounds like exocytosis? Water crossing the cell membrane isn't exocytosis.
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Postby mith » Sun Mar 06, 2005 4:27 am

according to MrMistery, the whole vacuole goes and joins with the cell membrane and part of it disappears to release the water.
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Postby Nick » Sun Mar 06, 2005 5:20 am

Isn't the movement of water over a membrane known as Diffusion?
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Postby Rainman600 » Sun Mar 06, 2005 5:28 am

Sinead Ryan wrote:so by using the micro fibres to contract the vacuole to rid the cell of water they vacuole prevents the cell from bursting??? how then does a vacuole in a plant cell ged rid of excess water??


there is no excess water in plant cells becuase the cell walls exert equal pressure on the cell membrane - causing osmosis to stop. This condition is called turgid.
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Postby Poison » Sun Mar 06, 2005 4:14 pm

Nick wrote:Isn't the movement of water over a membrane known as Diffusion?


It is called Osmosis. ;)
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