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effect of glucose on cell membranes

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Postby benny » Sun Oct 09, 2005 3:07 pm

thanks that's very helpful. is there any where i could go to check this out in more detail?
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Oct 09, 2005 5:34 pm

Glucose is transported inside the cell by a Na+ assisted simport system. So, yes the glucose might modify the electron gradient by inserting pozitive Na+ ions, but only if the cell "wants" to do so(remember simport is a form of active transport). So i don't know if you can say glucose influences the permeability...
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Postby benny » Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:58 pm

what is a simport system?
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Postby benny » Mon Oct 10, 2005 4:01 pm

we haven't come across that term yet.
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Postby benny » Mon Oct 10, 2005 5:01 pm

simultaneous transport? transport of two molecules in the same direction?
does glucose have an effect on the electron gradient? perhaps it's presence induces influx of Na+ ions, an effect of cotransport.
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Oct 10, 2005 6:08 pm

Wait wait wait wait...
I apologise i think i am a total idiot. Glucose is transported inside the cell through a Na-dependend simporter(yes, you are right with the definition of simport) but it is a secondary active transport mechanism, so it only uses ATP as a Na gradient(in animal cell) or H+ gradient(in plant cell). If you already have the gradient(that does take ATP to create) glucose will enter the cell passively through a permease, taking Na+ or H+ with it. So you can say it influences.
Take note that there is also a uniport way of transporting glucose passively, however this does not influence the permeability
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Postby benny » Tue Oct 11, 2005 10:49 am

so you think that the presence of glucose indirectly affects permeability, via it's effect on the Na+ or H+ gradients?
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Postby Mjhavok » Tue Oct 11, 2005 11:26 am

I thought Glucose was transported through the cell membrane. It's then changed into pyruvate and used in mitchondria for cellular respiration.

I did an experiment in university measuring pigment leakage from beetroot and thus checking the effects on the membrane. This was using different temperatures and also concentrations of methanol and acetone.
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Oct 11, 2005 5:57 pm

What you are saying is a completly different thing, Mjhavok

@benny
yes, that is what i am saying. But remember there is a pump that actively excrets Na+(at animal cell) or H+(at plant cell), so the balance will be quickly reestablished
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Postby benny » Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:56 am

so in a nutshell, glucose doesn't have any effect in itself. it's presence indirectly enacts other processes, ie the proteins responsible for ion transport. it doesn't affect the cell membrane itself. or does it? these are only conclusions i've come to from these posts. i'm not sure if i'm right. does glucose as a sugar have any chemical effect on the hydrocarbons or the lipids within the membrane?
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Oct 16, 2005 4:37 pm

I would say no
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