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enzyme and substrate

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enzyme and substrate

Postby sillysunrise » Mon Sep 26, 2005 3:11 am

Ok I need some help ;) what is the binding reaction between an enzyme and its substrate.

I have not been able to find what the name of this reaction is. Any help would be greatly appreciated ;)

Also I have another one...

The type of regulation when a product stops the process that produced it. I have not been able to find this either.

If anyone can help, thank you in advance ;)
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Postby mith » Mon Sep 26, 2005 4:04 am

I don't think it's a reaction...the term you're looking for might be induced fit.
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thanks

Postby sillysunrise » Mon Sep 26, 2005 4:16 am

I was a bit confused by those two questions, and thank you for your answer, I knew that I did not read that anywhere. So that goes to tell me why I could not find it huh ;) Well I am planning on asking my professor tomorrow about it anyway. Seems I should know this being a biology major, but you have to learn it somehow right ;) so far I have done very well.

I am just doing busy work because we were not able to have a lab, and those were two of the questions on it. I would much rather have a lab lol.

Thank you for your response.
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Postby GreenDog » Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:27 am

I think you mean the Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Substrate mechanism. When the product regulates it’s own production it’s called auto regulation, or auto inhibition. In the MM mechanism there are three ways of regulation: competitive, un-competitive and non-competitive. For further information look at Stryer– biochemistry.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?call=bv.View..ShowTOC&rid=stryer.TOC&depth=2
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Enzyme kinetics

Postby paperclip » Thu Sep 29, 2005 7:06 am

What is the rate laws governing substrate enzyme interaction. There should be two coefficients given that this interaction is reversible (in normal cases).
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Postby Navin » Thu Sep 29, 2005 9:53 am

We learnt in school abt the lock and key hypothesis where
the Enzyme is the lock and
the Substrate is the key.

The substrate(key) must fit perfectly into the surface configuration of the enzyme(lock).
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Postby mith » Thu Sep 29, 2005 12:05 pm

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No wonder

Postby paperclip » Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:55 am

That was a great website!
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Postby baikuza » Fri Sep 30, 2005 10:24 am

actually, the binding between them, enzymes and its substrats, caused by an electromagnetic forces, just like the van de wals force, i think.

then

"The type of regulation when a product stops the process that produced it. I have not been able to find this either."

in any cells there are some "genes regulator-....", i forget the right words.
and this genes classified to 2 general genes.
they are genes activator-...... :arrow: makes the enzymes active(ok i forget the last word)and
genes repressor-... :arrow: for make the enzymes non-active(i forget the right words after "genes", sorry)

ok.. even i forget much of the names i hope u 'r understand what i have said.

regard

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Postby paperclip » Mon Oct 03, 2005 3:06 pm

Hope this doesn't sound a bit toffygoshy but do substrates actually collide or crash into the active site of the enzyme as if by chance or do they migrate in some seemingly predicatble way into the cleft of the active site? And while they remain in the 'cavern' of that cleft, do they seek out hidy holes or crash about there too? Cause I think that they slow down a lot or do they jostle their way about everywhere and anywhere just so that they'll stick somehow somewhere? What kind of a viscosity is it in the cleft, do they get harpoon while they spend their time reorientating themselves inside the enzyme? Is the enzyme so large?
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Postby baikuza » Tue Oct 04, 2005 3:05 pm

from the last.
enzyme size is larger than the substrate.
hm... how those happen-enzyme and substrate?
honestly, i still do not have the answer, now. because i still at learning phases and do not already finish read it. and several day ago, i have the same question as you. but i still looking for the book(s) to.may be i must spend more time to find it. sorry.
may be some one else can help u.
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Postby jeffrey » Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:11 am

i only know a little about this ,hope my things can give you a hand. firstly, without enzyme, reactions can be carried on in solution , but most reactants have a water shell out of their surface, lot of energy needed for combining two reactants together and then form new products. secondly, inside certain enzyme, there is a special region which is definitely fit with some reactants.(sorry, i forget the name of this region, maybe ..... state)finally, with the help of different ammino acids of enzyme, the difficulty of breaking water shell on the reactants can be easy mannered. much less energy is needed. maybe that's why enzyme can rise the reaction rate.
for the second question, i think we call it feedback regulation(i study in europe), this is definitely needs the work of DNA and it's products--proteins
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