Login

Join for Free!
114024 members


Outline for TB powerpoint on Ecology and transmission

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderator: BioTeam

Outline for TB powerpoint on Ecology and transmission

Postby Inuyasha » Sat Sep 24, 2005 3:37 am

i need some one to help me edit this ROUGH draft. I need some one to proof read it.
Ty Guo
pronounced tiger
User avatar
Inuyasha
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:15 pm
Location: NEW YORK

Postby Inuyasha » Sat Sep 24, 2005 3:38 am

TB

Transmission
Spread through aerosol droplet. These droplets may occur due to persons with active TB coughing, sneezing, speaking, or spitting.

During the Industrial Revolution, TB was often mistaken for vampirism. When a member of a family died from TB, the other members would become infected and lose their health slowly. The original vampire was believed to suck life from his/her family members. People would dig up the body of the “vampire” and burn the heart. The traits of TB resembled the traits that vampires were supposed to have. Symptoms of TB included red, swollen eyes, pale skin, and blood coughs. These resembled what people figured a vampire was like.

Person
Persons that spend time with a person with active TB are group most at risk. A person with TB who is untreated can infect about 20 other people a year.

Foreign born from areas where TB is common, immunocompromised patients like the ones infected with HIV/AIDS, residents of congregated settings, health car workers who help TB infected patients, the medically uncovered, people who have low incomes, racial or ethnic minorities in populations, children with underdeveloped immune systems, and person who inject drugs.

Many wild mammals can carry TB. Because of this, regulations limiting ownership of novelty pets such as a pet skunk have been placed. The Canadian province of Quebec forbids the owning of hedgehogs as pets and the state of California forbids the ownership of pet gerbils.

Cattle and deer herds can easily be infected with bovine TB.

More than one third of the globe is infected with TB. Seven stales in the US bear over half the cases of TB diseases; Californian, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and Texas account for 59.9% of cases.

TB is more common among minority and foreign born individuals. TB among Asians is 20 times higher than that among whites, blacks and Hispanics each have rates eight times higher than whites.

In 2004, Hispanics had more cases of TB than any other group.

Place
TB is spread everywhere around the world. High risk zones include Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and South America. Third world countries are more prone to the infectious disease.


Time

TB has been present since antiquity. The origins of the disease follow the first domestication of cattle. Skeleton remains show that prehistoric humans (4,000BC) had TB. Egyptian mummies from 3000-2400 BC have also been found to have tubercular decay. References to Tb have been found in India around 2000 BC and in the Americas around 2000 BC.

Tb caused the most concern in the 19th and 20th century. In 1815 England one out of every four deaths came from TB; by the 1918’s in France one out of every six deaths were cause by TB. Efforts to spot TB were encouraged by the establishment in the 1880’s that TB was contagious.

In 1913 the Medical Research Council was formed in Britain; TB was still deadly enough to be considered its first project. By the 1950’s the deaths from TB fell rapidly. The rate of death from TB fell tenfold during 1850-1950. Improvement was greatly aided by antibiotics.

Since the rise of drug resistant strains in the 1980s have increased the risk of TB. Around 1987 TB seemed to have fallen to, but in 2001 the numbers picked up.

In the 1980s NY had a devastating experience when it eliminated public health facilities. Many failed to complete their course of drugs, the stop in mid-treatment induced drug resistant strains of TB. In fact many patients had multi-drug resistant strains. The strains were easily resistant to both Rifampin and Isonizid as well as a varied cocktail of drugs.

In 1993 the increase in TB has led to the declaration of a global health emergent by the World Health Organization.

In 2003 a group of scientists created a more lethal and rapidly reproduction strain of TB bacteria by disabling a set of genes.
Ty Guo
pronounced tiger
User avatar
Inuyasha
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:15 pm
Location: NEW YORK

Postby Inuyasha » Sat Sep 24, 2005 3:44 am

oh and can u please fill out missing parts.
Ty Guo
pronounced tiger
User avatar
Inuyasha
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:15 pm
Location: NEW YORK


Postby canalon » Sat Sep 24, 2005 11:00 pm

OK here are my comments...

First you need a description/definition of TB: symptoms, cause etc... and that's where you put the transmission part.

After that you choose between history or geography and give your data. Historically, use chronogical order, and you can had famous people dead from TB. Show taht it was before linked with poverty and small cramped houses, but that AIDS and new habits (drug...) put new people at risk.
Geography start by the worldwide distribution and narrow down to the distribution in US.
Then you add treatment and prevention (pet interdiction, BCG vaccine, antibiotic resistance).

I seriously doubt that enough person believed in (or even knew anything about) vampires to mistake TB for vampirism. And remember that it was a disaese of the poor, then of the illiterates, so Bram Stoker wasn't exactly that well known. I'd like to know you source for this one.

Good luck

PAtrick
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Postby Inuyasha » Mon Sep 26, 2005 1:24 am

Oh i forgot. I'm part of a group and i can only stay on topic for ecology and tranmission, or i would be steping on a few toes.
Ty Guo
pronounced tiger
User avatar
Inuyasha
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:15 pm
Location: NEW YORK

Postby Inuyasha » Tue Oct 04, 2005 3:02 am

i need more info. Please
Ty Guo
pronounced tiger
User avatar
Inuyasha
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:15 pm
Location: NEW YORK

Re: Outline for TB powerpoint on Ecology and transmission

Postby sara135 » Tue Jul 12, 2011 12:06 pm

Tuberculosis (TB) will not cause any symptoms until the infection has reached the lungs. As the bacteria are very slow moving, the condition develops very slowly. Your symptoms might not begin until many years after you were initially exposed to the bacteria.
sara135
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 2:10 pm


Return to Microbiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron