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2 homologous chromosomes, both used for g.expression?

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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2 homologous chromosomes, both used for g.expression?

Postby Barr » Fri Dec 30, 2011 8:44 pm

When there is a pair of homologous chromosomes (one from mother and one from father) it seems logical that for protein biosynthesis are used both as the information for one protein is the same.but how is it with dominant and recessive alleles? Recessive allele is prevented from being 'activated'?
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Postby JackBean » Fri Dec 30, 2011 10:36 pm

that depends, why is the allele recessive. Is it because the gene is truncated? Or is the protein just too low active? Or the promotor doesn't work?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Postby Barr » Fri Dec 30, 2011 10:55 pm

Hi, thanks for the response.I was thinking more like high school genetics, such as examples with green and yellow peas when green is dominant and yellow caused by a recessive allele. However i take it from your response that what makes an allele recessive is one of the three options you've presented (?). And from that would follow that a dominant allele is dominant because compared to the recessive it has a working promotor/more protein,...
And therefore when it comes to its expression it supresses the recessive?
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Postby JackBean » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:15 pm

the expression is not supressed by the dominant allele in means that the dominant protein would bind to DNA and inhibit the expression or something like that, but it's rather comparison of total protein activities.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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