Login

Join for Free!
112416 members


Dehydration time of a Bacterium

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderator: BioTeam

Dehydration time of a Bacterium

Postby Strangelet » Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:40 am

Hi,

If anyone works with microbes, could you tell me how long single bacteria might survive and continue to move if they are placed on a dry surface? Earlier I was under the impression that bacteria dry up and die within a few seconds of taking them out of water. However, I just remembered that several infections are caused by airborne bacteria. Do airborne bacteria have any tricks like hibernation which they use to stay alive, or is my estimate on bacteria survival time just completely wrong?

Does anyone have any idea if it would be feasible to try to observe Myxococcus xanthus moving on a silica (glass) surface? That particular species does not swim, it only crawls.

Thanks
Strangelet
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:25 am

Postby canalon » Thu Oct 06, 2011 4:38 pm

Your estimate is wrong.

The bacterial cell wall is much better than a simple membrane to prevent dessication. Depending on the species and the condition, survival will last from a few hours to days or longer. If they form spores, the upper bound is not known as some spores that were encapsulated by the ancient Egyptian had been revived after more than 2000 years later.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Postby aptitude » Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:02 am

Also, airborne bacteria are not transported through dry air, but rather through aerosols.
aptitude
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 12:58 am


Re: Dehydration time of a Bacterium

Postby Strangelet » Mon Oct 31, 2011 1:38 am

Hi,

Thanks for this information. It makes me happy.

canalon wrote:Depending on the species and the condition, survival will last from a few hours to days or longer.

Do you know of a citable, scholarly source I could look at which would basically tell me the same thing you say here? I tried to find one earlier, but without success.
Strangelet
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:25 am

Postby JorgeLobo » Sat Nov 12, 2011 3:29 am

ATCC provides virtually all its bacterial cultures as freeze dried materials.
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am


Return to Microbiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron