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Interactions between genes: in cancer and normal cells.

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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Interactions between genes: in cancer and normal cells.

Postby Hermanfialho » Thu Aug 25, 2011 6:44 pm

Mutations in APC gene can produce an excess of beta-catenin. We know that the beta-catenin can interage with the gene HIF1 in these conditions. My question is if in normal cells when the beta-catenin is produced there are interaction with this gene too. Sorry by my english.
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Postby JackBean » Thu Aug 25, 2011 9:04 pm

every interaction is in equilibrium quatified by dissociation constant K_D, so it depends on the levels of both proteins and on the K_D ;)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Re: Interactions between genes: in cancer and normal cells.

Postby merv » Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:41 am

Hermanfialho wrote:Mutations in APC gene can produce an excess of beta-catenin. We know that the beta-catenin can interage


you mean interact, dude.

Hermanfialho wrote:with the gene HIF1


you mean HIF1 protein, not gene

Hermanfialho wrote:in these conditions. My question is if in normal cells when the beta-catenin is produced there are interaction with this gene too.


well, whats a 'normal' cell...because not all normal cells produce this protein, so you want to know this too. As I understand it, to calculate the Kd (dissociation constants), you need to know the concentration of both proteins in your normal cell.

Hermanfialho wrote: Sorry by my english.


thats fine, keep at it!

Finally, my guess is that they will, but where do you get your information from that they bind at all? Anyway, to cut to the chase, One type of experiment you might like to try is:
In-vivo crosslinking of protein complexes using photo-reactive amino acid analogs as introduced in 2005 by researchers from the Max Planck Institute. In this method, cells are grown with photoreactive diazirine analogs to leucine and methionine, which are incorporated into proteins. Upon exposure to ultraviolet light, the diazirines are activated and bind to interacting proteins that are within a few angstroms of the photo-reactive amino acid analog.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methods_to ... teractions
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