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Axons generate impulse or transfers information

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Axons generate impulse or transfers information

Postby itsmridecide » Wed Jul 27, 2011 7:38 am

I know the fact that, if the total strength of the nerve signal exceeds the threshold at axon hillock, it triggers an action potential. But if someone asks me a question about axon being the nerve impulse generator or the structure responsible for transfer of information, then I would say that both are correct. But, if you have to chose any one of the two, what will you chose and why?
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Postby plasmodesmata11 » Sun Jul 31, 2011 5:13 pm

I would say, if you had to pick one (for a test or something?), the structure responsible for transfer of information is the better answer. I say this because there are many interneurons that are responsible for relaying information, whereas nerve endings that actually receive tactile information (corpuscles, etc.) aren't as numerous. They are the parts that convert external stimuli to electrical signals that are interpreted by our body. Axons are just propagating the signal.
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Re:

Postby aptitude » Mon Sep 12, 2011 2:19 am

plasmodesmata11 wrote:I would say, if you had to pick one (for a test or something?), the structure responsible for transfer of information is the better answer. I say this because there are many interneurons that are responsible for relaying information, whereas nerve endings that actually receive tactile information (corpuscles, etc.) aren't as numerous. They are the parts that convert external stimuli to electrical signals that are interpreted by our body. Axons are just propagating the signal.


I agree because the nerve impulse is generated at the axon hillock, not in the axon itself.
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