Login

Join for Free!
118908 members


Need identification of possible collembolan species

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

Moderator: BioTeam

Need identification of possible collembolan species

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 3:42 am

I found this little guy in Northern New Jersey he came scampering into my room, I just need a species ID/genus... I may have contracted a parasite from this guy based on my research if it is a positively ID'd as a collembolan
Attachments
small3.jpg
small2.jpg
small1.jpg
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am

Postby canalon » Thu Jun 02, 2011 3:57 am

Unlikely due to the absence of the spring tail (what size?)
And I hope that your parasite is not the one causing the mysterious disease which name starts with Mor- and finish with -gellons. If so you are deluded and you will not find help here.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:07 am

I believe I may have knocked off the springers in the kill, here is the last picture containing the rest of the parts
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am


Re: Need identification of possible collembolan species

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:09 am

It is approx. 1in in length
Attachments
small4.jpg
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:13 am

there were a total of 6 limbs im not sure if the springs fell off when i smushed him but I tried to be delicate....
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:19 am

i will reply with more info on my condition tomorrow, any help is much appreciated... I am just interested in identifying the species as of now
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am

Postby canalon » Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:49 pm

So to big to be a collembola according to this:
http://www.collembola.org/
Collembola are small ([min. 0.12] 1-5 [max. 17] mm), entognathous (mouthparts located within a 'gnathal pouch'), wingless hexapods with antennae always present. Most but not all Collembola may be recognised by a posterior ventral forked abdominal appendage, the furca
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Postby tommyjackets » Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:25 pm

COLLEMBOLA (SPRINGTAILS) (ARTHROPODA: HEXAPODA: ENTOGNATHA)
FOUND IN SCRAPINGS FROM INDIVIDUALS DIAGNOSED WITH DELUSORY PARASITOSIS

Deborah Z. Altschuler,a Michael Crutcher, MD, MPH, FACPM,b
Neculai Dulceanu, DVM, PhD (deceased),c Beth A. Cervantes,a
Cristina Terinte, MD, PhD,d and Louis N. Sorkin, BCEe

Abstract - Twenty individuals diagnosed with delusory parasitosis participated in a single site clinical study under the auspices of the National Pediculosis Association (NPA) and the Oklahoma State Department of Health. The objective of this study was to determine if there were any common factors in skin scrapings collected from this population. These individuals, whose symptoms were originally attributed to lice or scabies, were part of a larger group reporting symptoms of stinging/biting and/or crawling to the NPA. Multiple skin scrapings from each person were microscopically examined. Any and all fields of view that appeared incongruous to normal human skin were digitally photographed. When the photographic images were initially evaluated, no common factor was identified. However, more extensive scrutiny using imaging software revealed evidence of Collembola in 18 of the 20 participants.


http://www.headlice.org/news/2004/delusory.htm
tommyjackets
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:12 am


Return to Human Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests