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Non-Hygroscopic Lactic Acid?

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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Non-Hygroscopic Lactic Acid?

Postby TheRoseFire » Mon May 09, 2011 5:53 am

Hi all!

I am new to this forum and will openly admit I am FAR from being a chemist or molecular biologist! I am simply a novice homeopath wannabe!

I'm hoping to glean from your expertise in a problem I'm having making a facial peel product.

A key ingredient I use is lactic acid from heavy cream or sour milk mixed with other ingredients to make a peel that softens, smooths and eliminates acne, milia and helps with aging skin in general.

However, I used to make it just for myself but now I have many family and friends that want my product. I'm not charging for it just giving as gifts. But I usually make my mix and use it immediately so there is no time for it to change its texture or consistency.

When making it to send to family it will harden on top and darken in color after exposed to air in just half a day. I need it to keep for much longer. Even if I put it in an airtight container it still does this. I'm guessing because there is still air between the container lid and the product. I thought I could can it with heat and send it but as soon as they open it, even if they put it in the fridge, it'll still darken and harden as before.

I found out that I can maybe use NON-Hygroscopic (doesn't absorb moisture) Lactic Acid powder. But I'm not sure if it'll work because it may take away the properties of lactic acid that absorbs oils for oily skin.

Can anyone help me determine how I might either buy or make a non-perishable, lactic acid (or lactic acid like - meaning alpha hydroxy benefits) that doesn't change when exposed to air? Or maybe I need a tube like container I can fill that has no air at all like toothpaste?

I also found out that I might be able to make my own lactic acid like powder by fermenting sugar or plant carbohydrates with yeast at home, then drying it in my solar food dehydrator. But I'm afraid I might go through all that then when I add things with moisture in it like creams/gels and juices to the mix to make the peel, I'd just be recreating the problem anyway.

I hope I'm making sense to all of you and that I'm addressing a question to the appropriate forum/group.

Please help!?
TheRoseFire
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