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Chemical Energy of Macromolecules

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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Chemical Energy of Macromolecules

Postby rosegarden » Tue Feb 22, 2011 1:47 am

Hey guys,
I'm having trouble figuring out which of the following molecules have more chemical energy per gram: cellulose, glucose, starch, canola oil, or glycogen

I think the canola oil probably has the most energy because it's a highly reduced fatty acid. I don't know which one of glucose, starch, or glycogen will come next as all 3 of them are carbs. Cellulose will probably have the least chemical energy since it is just used for structure.
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Postby JackBean » Tue Feb 22, 2011 6:37 pm

you mean by digestion?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby rosegarden » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:18 am

Well I don't really mean nutritionally, just how much chemical energy is stored in there. I think the order of macromolecules from most chemical energy to least is:
canola oil > glycogen > starch > cellulose > glucose

but I just don't know if cellulose would have higher chem energy than glycogen due to the H bonding between cellulose strands...
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Postby JackBean » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:16 am

if it's in its native state, then it should be like oil > cellulose > starch > glycogen > Glc
The reason, why I gave cellulose first (or just second after the oil) is, that it is well packed, so I would assume, it doesn't contain that much water as the other sugars do, because they are highly hydrated.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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