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What makes us feel full when we eat? (energy, volume, mass)

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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What makes us feel full when we eat? (energy, volume, mass)

Postby poobear » Thu Jan 27, 2011 7:02 pm

After we eat we start to feel full. What to we know about this trigger?
I have 3 guesses, energy uptake, food volume in stomach, food mass in stomach.
I think it takes some time for the energy to be taken up from the food, so I think it more has to do with the volume and the mass of the food. So is it caused by volume that would expand the stomach, or by mass that would maybe cause a downward pressure as the food gets heavier?

Thanks
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Postby abbaseltaalu » Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:05 am

This is controlled by the nervous system, in the ‘Satiety’ and ‘feeding’ centres of the lateral hypothalamus. The actions of these two nerve centers have opposite effects.
If the feeding center is stimulated, we feel the sensation of hunger, and we will eat. Many of the stimuli that tell the hypothalamus that we are hungry originate in the organs of the body. If the nutrient level of the blood is too low, the hypothalamus is alerted (we then feel a sensation of hunger) and the feeding center, initiates eating behavior. External stimuli can also initiate eating behavior. The sight, sound, and even the thought of food initiate impulses that eventually reach the feeding center in the hypothalamus. Specific hungers are stimulated by specific deficiencies.
If the feeding center is inhibited by being full or otherwise, we feel the sensation of contention or satisfaction, hence the name ‘satiety’, we stop eating. The satiety center tells the organism when he has had enough to eat. Removal of the satiety center causes an animal to eat continuously and he will grow far beyond his normal size.


In summary, when we are subjected to certain stimuli, the hunger-producing center initiates the eating response. When we have eaten enough, the satiety center tells us to stop.
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Re:

Postby poobear » Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:29 pm

abbaseltaalu wrote:This is controlled by the nervous system, in the ‘Satiety’ and ‘feeding’ centres of the lateral hypothalamus. The actions of these two nerve centers have opposite effects.
If the feeding center is stimulated, we feel the sensation of hunger, and we will eat. Many of the stimuli that tell the hypothalamus that we are hungry originate in the organs of the body. If the nutrient level of the blood is too low, the hypothalamus is alerted (we then feel a sensation of hunger) and the feeding center, initiates eating behavior. External stimuli can also initiate eating behavior. The sight, sound, and even the thought of food initiate impulses that eventually reach the feeding center in the hypothalamus. Specific hungers are stimulated by specific deficiencies.
If the feeding center is inhibited by being full or otherwise, we feel the sensation of contention or satisfaction, hence the name ‘satiety’, we stop eating. The satiety center tells the organism when he has had enough to eat. Removal of the satiety center causes an animal to eat continuously and he will grow far beyond his normal size.


In summary, when we are subjected to certain stimuli, the hunger-producing center initiates the eating response. When we have eaten enough, the satiety center tells us to stop.

Thanks for the answer. I do understand that lack of nutrients can tell the body to eat more. But as you in the end say "When we have eaten enough, the satiety center tells us to stop", this is what I want to know more about. What tells the body that we have eaten enough? This is where I guess the volume or the mass of the food comes in, but I don't know in which extent they have.

edit: Thinking about this again, energy must certainly have a role, as the hunger goes away much faster when I eat carbs compared to when I eat vegetables.
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