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Identifying bacteria?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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Identifying bacteria?

Postby Joasht » Mon Aug 08, 2005 4:55 pm

Hi kinda new here, intro'ed myself in the off-topic section, for those who wanna read a lil about me :)

Anyway, I have this report due this thursday. We had a two-week long lab experiment with bacteria, and at the end of it, we have to write a report (as usual). Now the thing is, my demonstrator is kinda expecting a rather impossible task. Using only the info I'm giving below, I have to actually identify the two strains of bacteria.

I'm still a first year 2nd sem student, so this is kinda, well, really hard for me especially without personal help and without the correct links. Did quite abit of browsing, didn't come across anything online...hope you guys can help. Btw here is the info:

Microorganism Sample A Sample B
Motility Positive Positive
Haemolysis α-haemolysis β-haemolysis
Gram stain Positive Negative
Spores Positive Negative
Capsule Positive Negative
Catalase Positive Positive

For sample A, the closest I could find so far was B.subtilis, but it its b-hemolytic, not a-hemolytic.

Any help, ideas, or links will be greatly appreciated. Sorry if this might be a little too much, but....well I gotta get this done with (for the record, most of my classmates have already given up and decided to simply go with general statements on the bacteria, so there goes "depending on my peers"...)

Thanks!

EDIT:
Hmm table didn't turn out right......anyway its a three-column table, with "microorganism" being the 1st column, and sample A and B being the other two columns.
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Bacteria Identification

Postby PaulineRhook » Wed Sep 07, 2005 11:13 pm

Hi,

with a couple of the identifying characteristics that you have suggested, Streptococcus pneumoniae is Alpha Haemolytic and capsule forming. It is responsible for infections such as Meningitis, Pneumonia, Sinusitis to name a few.

Hope this helps

Pauline :?
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Postby Lukaszos » Tue Sep 13, 2005 11:09 pm

I'm still thinking about microorganizm A - and I really don't know what it is - S. pneumonia doesn't match because of spores (negativ)
Maybe some of Bacillus are able to Alpha - Haemolitic
When you solve this problem please answer

Best regards
Lukaszos

_
Sorry for my English
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Postby 908margarita » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:47 pm

heloo
i have the same clues that you had for my micro, what was your answer?
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Postby Sepals » Wed Mar 18, 2009 11:02 am

Are they rod or cocci? Also how would you describe their clustering? I can't help as I'm at work, but when I get home I'll do a bit of research and see what comes up.
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Re: Identifying bacteria?

Postby Sepals » Mon Mar 23, 2009 11:01 am

I think sample B might be Bacillus as this produces B haemolysis, although it isn't motile.

I think you need further testing to identify them for sure.

Btw I assumed they are rods as you said they are motile, sure about that? You haven't mentioned what kind of motility either....
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