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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Thu Aug 31, 2006 4:59 pm

Tam Tam,

FYI I did indeed find the Laughfton (sp?) air force base and the story you hinted around to go with it. You were right, but you just did not divulge everything. But, anyway, you were not lying and I wanted everyone to know that.
Today I was going back thru something I had mailed myself when I was still using AOL -so this was last Sept. that I found this.....too much damn time wasted that is for sure.....just wanted to share it. I was apparently looking at the fungus gnats way back then.

Landcare Research

Abstract No practical methods are currently available for area-wide, long-term control of social wasps in New Zealand. Pathogens have received little attention as potential control agents. Records from wasps of the genera Vespula, Vespa, and Dolichovespula and their associated nest material include 50 fungal, 12 bacterial, 5-7 nematode, 4 protozoan, and 2 viral species, although few have been confirmed through bioassay as pathogens of these wasp species. Despite few naturally-occurring host-specific pathogens and records of diseased colonies, wasps are susceptible to generalist insect diseases in bioassays. Fungi belonging to the genera Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, Metarhizium, and Beauveria have been confirmed through bioassay as Vespiniae pathogens, as have the bacteria Serratia marcescens and Bacillus thuringiensis, and nematodes Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, Steinernema (= Neoaplectana) sp., S. feltiae, S. carpocapsae and Pheromermis vesparum. Several of the pathogens listed here provide a resource from which inundative control agents might be developed, but none have potential as classical self sustaining control agents that can be transferred from generation to generation. As few studies have systematically searched for pathogens, it is likely other candidates suitable for use as control agents may be found.

Keywords Vespinae; Vespula; Vespa; Dolichovespula; social wasps; pathogen; biological control

Received 27 July 1998; accepted 11 March 1999

Since Barz brought up Monsanto (ick!!) and most of us are familiar with their heinous crimes, I thought it was funny to see these sponsors from a GM organisms article I just read. Look! Why it's the American Gov't right along with Mansanto.....USDA>>>boo!
Sponsored by:
USDA-APHIS
EU-DG XII
AAFC- MISB
DuPont
Monsanto
Novartis
Aventis
AgWest Biotech, Inc.
University of Saskatchewan
NRI-PBI
Canadian Wheat Board
Agrium
Foragen

DID I JUST READ THIS RIGHT?

Although the control population for the study may continue to face the same high risk of contracting
the disease, recent trends in research ethics debate whether we can leave control groups without any
treatment. Therefore, ethically there may need to be some other vector reduction measures given if
making any interventional study in an area. While those designing ethical guidelines on placebo-controlled
trials (e.g. Helsinki Declaration) were thinking of placebo controls on clinical trials of potential
medical drugs, we can ask the ethical question whether researchers have an obligation to the local population
to use the best available means of disease control whenever they enter an area for a study. This
practically means that, as well as studying the new method, a researcher may ethically be compelled
to also provide the best available proven alternative to the study population. There may be times when
the provision of the proven alternative to the area of study alters the dynamics of the disease so that
the results of the vector field trial differ from what the results would have been had no established
alternative been provided.
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Postby RANDY » Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:44 pm

UpdateL

Cream works to get rid of lesions. Write me if you want more info: cisfl2004@netzero.com

I just returned home from a 5 day stay in the hospital due to a busted appendix..at my age that only happens from parasitic worms, I am told. They kept me in the ER for 14 hours before operating.

There is a national backlog on Ivemetrin..first time that ever happened.


Schwartz has his book and tapes out

His note to me:

hi randy. see http://www.beatricebooks.com have all info and protocols. also sent
parasite stage for dna analysis/pending. thread-forming stage.grs

And teh German cream does clear your skin of lesions. I will be able to wear clothes without sleeves.

Well..back to bed for me....I can not really sit up for more than 10 minutes at a time, yet.

Randy

I am still taking phone calls for anyone with questions about this disease.


So people..what are we up to now. What solid rock conclusions have we come up with since I have been in the hospital? Anyone want to review.

Too much info and dis-info to read. I am sure many feel the same as I do.

randy

434-974-7128
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Postby London » Thu Aug 31, 2006 9:16 pm

Randy,

I'm glad you wrote, I just asked Skytroll yesterday if anyone had heard from you. Man, you had it bad and I am really sorry. Thankfully you have insurance now. You will be in our thoughts.

London
____________________________________________________

Skytroll,

As per your request, here is what Irvine is doing at their University:

REAGENTS AND PROTOCOLS

Adenovirus

Adenovirus Type 5 ShuttleVectors (E1A deletion) for propagation of Recombinant Adenovirus
pLAD pAddel
Adenovirus Type 5 Helper Plasmid
pJM17
Recombinant Adenovirus expressing:
Bacterial beta-galactosidase gene from the CMV promoter (AD5CMVLacZ)
Retrovirus


Murine Leukemia-based vectors for the construction of recombinant retrovirus
pCH#8
Packaging Cell Lines for MuLV-based vectors
PA317 (amphotropic)
Psi 2 (ecotropic)
Producer Cell Lines:
BAG (MuLV recombinant expressing the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene)
43D (wild type MuLV producer cell line)
Other Virus
Recombinant Herpes (HSVI)
Polyomavirus and
AAV can be made for specific projects
In addition, fully defective helper tree adenovirus can be made

PROTOCOLS
Adenovirus

Retrovirus

Did you see it? The Polymovirus ....
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Postby tamtam » Thu Aug 31, 2006 9:42 pm

A link that associates quorum sensing and pseudomonas aeruginosa with drug resistance:

Drug resistance may travel same path as quorum sensing
Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Design, synthesis and analysis of ... With few factors, adult cells take on character of embryonic stem cells ...

http://66.249.93.104/search?q=cache:43H ... =clnk&cd=1

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

J. Bact -- Table of Contents (April 15 2004, 186 [8])
Pseudomonas aeruginosa Autoinducer Enters and Functions in Mammalian Cells ... The Gas Vesicle Gene Cluster from Microcystis aeruginosa and DNA ...
jb.asm.org/content/vol186/issue8/index.shtml - Similar pages


http://jb.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/186/8/2281

.........................................................................................................

embryonic stem cells and quorum sensing

June 20, 2006
... and quorum sensing behavior in higher level organisms such as yeast. Finally, we will discuss preliminary results in mouse embryonic stem cells of ...
si.epfl.ch/page16497.html - 12k - Cached - Similar pages

http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:gQ ... =clnk&cd=8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conway///// http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/


Sincerely,

tamtam
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Postby London » Fri Sep 01, 2006 2:04 am

From Senor' TamTam's links it said:

we can now regard cells as "programmable matter." Through genetic engineering, we are equipping cells with new sophisticated capabilities for gene regulation, information processing, and communication. These new capabilities serve as catalysts for Synthetic Biology, an emerging engineering discipline to program cell behaviors as easily as we program computers
____________________________________________________

Well I have been reading on this since I discovered (my opinion) that Photons were involved. But here is what I don't get dammit. I said back in November on this site and another one, that it's about the computer and also wireless technologies, why wait until now to tell us?

Oh well. Also, this is strange, I just read about the game of Life when I skipped work yesterday. But it was not Conways, I think it was analogized with some goofy cartoon characters.....The Creatixes or something like that.

So, what's the deal then, what are they fighting over? This is all gonna go back to electromagnetic stuff hah? and...the radiation from it...Just like when they stick the barcode on meat- it probably ruins it.

So, what do you think TamTam?

Also TamTam, yesterday I made a guess really as to what type of fibers we have in us, you know, "the Stray Targets!"

I have no idea if this is right or way far off but I guessed the PDMS Fibers-
I read where they don't respond to a flame and chose that as my answer.

Could you please tell me what you think of it? Margellons, from the blog site Morgellons Watch said I was way wrong....but I would like your opinion please.
___________________________________________________

Remember this, b/c MM did not: It's a Free World Suckers! F YOU
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Morgellons discussion ??

Postby Marc Neumann » Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:06 am

Hello to all,
my name is Marc Neumann.
I am researching for a couple of month on morgellons, for inside an especially for outside medications. With no already known stuffs !!
I was successfull with a cream, which i could make more better and effective the last weeks. But also before it was very good...
I watched many discussions about Randy Yaskal and London ecc. in your board, well to many written things about nothing...Lets stay by the main problems "Morgellons desease".
I can only say, that i found out much more then any doctor. I don`t know what they are doing the whole time in the past years, but i found out more
in the last 4 month, i started doing studies over it 4.5 month ago. Watch even my pictures on www. morgellons-research.org, if you don`t seen it already. I will post also more pics and morgellons movies in few days and more latest informations. naturally for free. I don`t need to sell a 150 Dollar CD, or a book, like Dr. Schwartz ???. Well he might be ok, but i can see that sign in his eyes $$$$. Anyway i contacted Merck in Holland the producer of e.g. Ivermectin, they answered me that the treatment like dr. schartz is doing, is a little much to heavy, because normally you should take maximum every half year 6-12 tablets, or 8 tablets in one year. In their medical description is it written also clearly. Don`t use more !!!! If yes go immediatly to a internist, they write. Yes, it is poison and not vitamin tablets. It can causes holes at the brain, as many german scientists and veterinolgic med says. So every week 4 tablets as dr. schwartz medication claims, will 1. not working, because its to less to kill morgellons. 2. It is to much for the human body anyway. Morgellons will adapt to thus less poison treatment, as e.g. Rasputin done it with Arsenic treatment. Ivermectin in higher dosage once and 7 or 10 days later the second dosage, is better then every week 4 tablets, for saying it clearly. Some death cases can result from it anyway. wait til some people have finished their money and the cure and then you will see that nothing has changed with the infestation. Just 3-4 days after the last medication they start again, with the wellknown old infestations.
Think what you want, but take care, poison is poison, even if they give you a CD with it, how to use poison. By the way, it`s russian roulette anyway.
Greetings Marc
Marc Neumann
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Postby RANDY » Fri Sep 01, 2006 6:41 pm

Anyone who tried to call me..please call againa nd when you leave your number speak slow......very slow.....I am dyslexic..you have to be very slow when you give you call back number.

Please try again...slow and clear and then repeat.
Please give your number in the beginning of the tape and at the end..but slow and clear.

I am off to a docs appt right now and will be home later tonight.


Thanks,

Randy
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AudioFile

Postby Systemic » Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:22 pm

Have you guys listened to this.
http://www.responsibletechnology.org/utility/showArticle/?objectID=166
Might answer some of your questions.
Thanks for the hard work guys. looking forward to the proof.

If the bacteria is antibiotic resistant, How do we kill it with out killing us?
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Postby London » Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:34 pm

GENETIC MODIFICATION SUCKS ROCKS

We started out with the GM plants, then they tamnpered with them and but the bt. in the plants....how safe can that be when I eat these plants? Hmmm....but nevertheless, this led to problems with the good beneficial insects. They now were being eaten. The entire GM thing has exploded to a GM mass of a big mess. Go die you biotech monsters.

But they didn't. Now, I think to help control the big, bad diseases like Dengue fever, Malaria, Chagas and the likes, they first had to release more insects with this disease vector in order to kill it eventually-(this is where I am confused) but nevetheless, we got problems. Here are some notes I made:

Some people are willing to sacrifice themselves for the environment.( NOT ME DAMMIT!) Examples such as the preservation
of sacred groves in India for thousands of years, even during times of severe crisis and human
death (Gupta and Guha, 2002), show that in some cultures almost all people are willing to die rather
than damage that part of the environment they cherish. This behaviour is often linked to religious
beliefs in the afterlife.

A variety of potential broader ecological, environmental and health risks are associated with the
release of GM organisms. Environmental risks can be considered from both anthropocentric and ecocentric-
based approaches. The risks identified include the possibility of horizontal transfer of the transgene
to non-target organisms, and possible disturbance of insect ecology (Tiedje et al. 1989; Hoy,
1995; Nuffield Council of Bioethics, 1999[a]).

There have also been concerns expressed in some cultures,
e.g. New Zealand, over the need to value the native fauna and flora, which is considered by many
in the Maori community to be something not to modify (New Zealand Royal Commission, 2002). While
human beings cannot consent for other organisms to be modified, very few persons suggest that any
consent is required except for possibly sentient animals.
Any risks to the agricultural systems of rural communities also require assessment, as animal diseases
transmitted by vectors are important to farming families. In addition, there may also be risks to wild
animals in surrounding areas, which in some ecocentric environmental views have more intrinsic rights
to be left undisturbed than farm animals (Rolston 1994). This calls for broad ecological understanding
of the impact, beyond public health.

The emergence of insecticide-resistant insect vectors
of disease, among other things, is leading to a resurgence in insect-borne diseases
such as malaria and dengue fever. Currently there are over 1 million deaths from
malaria and over 300 million acute cases of the disease annually. No less than 40
percent of the world’s population is now at risk of contracting malaria. Ninety
248
Transgenic Insects
percent of the mortality associated with malaria presently is confined to sub-Saharan Africa
(WHO/OMS 1998). Although the severity of this problem is reflected by its impact on
human health, note that the economic impact of malaria is similarly severe. It has been
estimated that the economic growth of Africa is reduced up to 1.3 percent annually as a
result of this disease. The short-term economic benefits of controlling malaria are estimated
to be between $3 and $12 billion per year (WHO/OMS 1998). Consequently, transgenic
insect technologies are also being explored as tools for solving public health problems.

Although
the challenges associated with the development of safe and effective transgenic insects are
significant, this technology may lead to the expanded use of genetic and biological control
strategies in pest management programs. This would satisfy the growing demands to reduce
chemical inputs into the environment and the development of sustainable agricultural systems.


The following are two ways.....I think the predatory mite was released to kill off the spiders that were eating away at the strawberries in California....

There are two general approaches to augmentation: inundative releases and inoculative releases. Inundation involves releasing large numbers of natural enemies for immediate reduction of a damaging or near-damaging pest population. It is a corrective measure; the expected outcome is immediate pest control. Because of the nature of natural enemy activity, and the cost of purchasing them, this approach using predaceous and parasitic insects is recommended only in certain situations, such as the mass release of the egg parasite Trichogramma for controlling the eggs of various types of moths. The utilization of some microbial insecticides (such as those containing Bacillus thuringiensis) is also inundation. Inoculation involves releasing small numbers of natural enemies at prescribed intervals throughout the pest period, starting when the pest population is very low. The natural enemies are expected to reproduce themselves to provide more long-term control. The expected outcome of inoculative releases is to keep the pest at low numbers, never allowing it to approach an economic injury level; therefore, it is more of a preventive measure. Two examples are the release of predatory mites to protect greenhouse crops, and the inoculation of soils with the milkyspore pathogen (Bacillus popillae) to control Japanese beetle grubs.

AND THIS IS MY FAVORITE PART OF MY NOTES, WILL YOU GET A LOOK AT THIS:

Although the control population for the study may continue to face the same high risk of contracting
the disease, recent trends in research ethics debate whether we can leave control groups without any
treatment.
:shock: Therefore, ethically there may need to be some other vector reduction measures given if
making any interventional study in an area. While those designing ethical guidelines on placebo-controlled
trials (e.g. Helsinki Declaration) were thinking of placebo controls on clinical trials of potential
medical drugs, we can ask the ethical question whether researchers have an obligation to the local population
to use the best available means of disease control whenever they enter an area for a study.
This
practically means that, as well as studying the new method, a researcher may ethically be compelled
to also provide the best available proven alternative to the study population. There may be times when
the provision of the proven alternative to the area of study alters the dynamics of the disease so that
the results of the vector field trial differ from what the results would have been had no established
alternative been provided.

The risks may not just be those that arise directly from the ability of the vector to carry the target
pathogen. There could be a negative impact on human health by altering the behaviour of blood-feeding
insects. In the case of insects that cannot be confined to a particular population, whether they
flyor float to new places, notions of "human subject" and "informed consent" need to be extended.
There are basic ethical issues involved in vector collection and studies in the field. Firstly, many such
studies have relied on a researcher waiting for the vector to land on a human host, and then capturing
it hopefully before the vector has transmitted the pathogen to the "bait". In fact, any field studies
in which human beings are exposed to the pathogens raise the question as to why some other intervention
is not used in that area.
:?:

It is possible to imagine the rumours that would arise mid-trial should an uncontrollable event like
flooding ever result in an increase of vector population. The increase in vector population might be
falsely attributed to the trial of the modified vector and result in increased public opposition to the
trial. Perhaps, in such an event, community opposition to the trial grows from 5% to 30%. Can consent
be withdrawn at this stage, as it can by an individuals who are participating in a clinical drug
trial? Release of a modified vector is not the same as a clinical trial of a new drug. Once started, all
persons in the area have to continue to be subjects, until the point when the whole community decides
to stop the trial and the trial is terminated.
On the other hand, a contingency plan for an unexpected adverse event must be ready in case the modified
vectors need to be killed.
This could either involve a pesticide or a specific chemical designed to
selectively kill the modified vectors. It might be possible to insert specific chemical sensitivity in the
vector by genetic modification. In this case, the added expense in terms of finance and risks to the environment
and health for control of genetically modified vector trials having bad effects would be justified,
whereas in the existing situation such control measures would neither be feasible nor appropriate.
After completing the field trial, if the modified vector is recommended for larger scale or general use,
it may not be practical to obtain the consent of everyone in the community. A referendum might be
the most appropriate method of providing information to the community, but there may be no way to
accommodate the wishes of a significant minority if the substantial majority agrees and the scientific
evidence supports the intervention. In many endemic areas there are no appropriate political structures
to consider a referendum.

NOW, WOULD YOU LOOK AT THIS PLEASE?

6.3 National and regional regulations
General guidelines for working with recombinant organisms exist in many countries, and international
assistance through the Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development (OECD) and UNIDO is
available for countries that do not have regulations. Some countries have already established and published
guidelines for the safety assessment of genetically modified insects. The international regulations
are important as models for countries that lack the means for considering the details on their
own.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has reported the results and approval procedures
for six trials of genetically modified organisms. These include field trials of transgenic mites, nematodes,
flies, spruce budworm, and pink bollworm, as discussed above (USDA, 2002). The field trials of
transgenic nematodes and predatory mites were intended to study the risk to the environment of these
transgenic organisms and the stability of the transgenes under controlled conditions. The genetic modifications
did not affect infectivity of the nematodes, however the field performance of the transgenic
mites (in Florida) was dramatically different to in the laboratory due to differences in relative humidity,
and the field experiment was terminated after three weeks because populations of both predatory
mites and prey spider mites declined rapidly. Few individuals in the population contained the transgene.
At the end of these field trials, all the transgenic organisms and hosts were destroyed.
Like most medical associations, some professional scientific organizations have ethics codes (e.g. the
American Anthropological Association, 1998). More specific to transgenic insects in the USA, Arthropod
Containment Guidelines were developed by the American Committee of Medical Entomology (ACME,
2000), part of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. If the transgenic arthropod is
assigned to a risk level in the US public health services’ Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical
Laboratories, then institutional biosafety committee approval is required. If the field study involves
humans, IRB oversight is necessary. IRBs in the USA require each human subject in a field trial to give
informed consent to be involved in the project, as discussed in section 4. This example may be useful
as a model for developing international guidelines, and for countries developing their own guidelines.
A few local communities have established GM free areas, but this may require specific national legislation.
Australia allows local communities to declare GM-free areas, and in a sense this is consistent
with the ethical underpinning that leads to calls for community consent. It is an issue that needs to
be considered in the field in particular cultural and political frameworks. If a specific sector of a community
has a medical need, their claim to be free of risk of disease does need to be taken into account
if other members of the community have blocked efforts towards new strategies that might reduce this
disease burden.

Yes Systemic, you are right, our foods are loaded with poisonous chemicals….but, like you are coming to find out, it’s in the medicines.

Are we screwed or what?

PS: Most of the notes are from our local WHO and what they say about biotechnology. Some leaders we have, eh?

Mark, you said this: Morgellons will adapt to thus less poison treatment, as e.g. Rasputin done it with Arsenic treatment. Ivermectin in higher dosage once and 7 or 10 days later the second dosage, is better then every week 4 tablets, for saying it clearly.
so, are you advocating this of saying no. Sorry, but I got a lil confused with what you were trying to say.

Randy, I hate to ask you this, but if they did surgery on you, did they not see any parasites in your body? Thanks if you can answer this.
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Postby RANDY » Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:14 pm

Surgery YES..Parasites...they would not tell me..so I have requested all my medical records from the time they checked me in to the time they released me.

They kept me in teh ER waiting to be operated for over 14 hours with a ruptured appendix..hoping I would die????..but I am tough..... feeling much better today.

Check http://cherokeechas for the fundraiser they are having in October for research.

http://www.morgellons-research.org/

Plase read this very well thought out and reveiwed site by a fellow sufferer that contacted a retired chemist that worked on this disease with him to create a healing cream for lesions.

It works....not a cure..but a heling cream for lesions.

I do not want to spam but this is good NEWS for those of you like me with non-healing skin lesions.


Randy
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Postby RANDY » Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:40 pm

Letter to CDC:

morgellonssyndrome@cdc.gov


1) Please give me the number that doctors can call to ask about this disease if they have someone sitting in their office.

2) Has anyone conference as of yet and may I please have the minutes of that meeting.

3) What is the CDC doing about the hole in the system that exists where no unknown disease or syndrome has a protocol unless many die all at once or a mass disfiguration occurs. Where is the protocol for a genetic engineered bioterrorsim weapon that causes a slow death?
WE HAVE NO SYSTEM IN PLACE!!!!

I will keep on writing this note to you until I get a REAL answer. I will be taking these questions to the PRESS during this election year!

Thank you,

Randy B Yaskal
434-974-7128
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Suspect

Postby Systemic » Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:47 pm

I suspect the biotech bolloworm that was released in 2001

in other words, the cotton. its sprayed on the cotton.
my opinion only, based on insight to how i got sick.

http://ipm.osu.edu/trans/03_082.htm

I'm diggin this one too.

http://www.paratekpharm.com/i_multiple.html
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