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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:01 pm

ha friggin ha.

So, you telling me you honestly do not think that the CDC has no idea what this is? hahahahaha that's funny.

and......people that post this is not conspiracy.....hahaha well, what should
I call it then? Tell you what....since they do not reconize it as a disease yet, i.e., it is not out in the open.......that would mean it is COVERED UP, i.e., ....A COVER UP. So, that's not a conspiracy is it? For it's just a cover-up......

Hell, I'd cover it up too if I created it.....and if i'm lying/ i'm dying....I saw the written document where the doctors were warned to cover it.

I saw it 3 days ago with my own eyes. I have no idea where I found it
thus can't not back up what I say at the moment. I also don't give a damn
if anyone believes me or not. and I don't give a damn if I look like some crazy loon person> or whatever the moderator insinuated a week or so ago.

For I am out to prove Jack crap to no one but myself.
London
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:08 pm

Loved the Ecuador and Peru story. Too funny-the names of the Dr.s.
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:19 pm

Dear Linn,

Why was there no hyperlink to your Mayo Clinic article? Could you possibly provide that for us sick as hell folK?

So, wonder whay happened to the Texan?

PS:Lyme disease has become a serious public health threat in the U.S. The disease has now spread to 46 states.


How fortunate for governments that the people they administer don't think."

— Adolf Hitler
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:16 pm

Health alert:

http://www.lostartsmedia.com/thingspeop ... know2.html

and:

http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headline ... leID=24052

and:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 231429.htm

Biotechnology, ethics, and the structure of agriculture
Jeffrey Burkhardt


Abstract The new agricultural biotechnologies are presently high-priority items on the national research agenda. The promise of increased efficiency and productivity resulting from products and processes derived from biotech is thought to justify the commitment to R&D. Nevertheless, critics challenge the environmental safety as well as political-economic consequences of particular products of biotech, notably, ice-nucleating bacteria and the bovine growth hormone. In this paper the critics' arguments are analyzed in explicitly ethical terms, and assessed as to their relative merits. In some cases, a principle of do no foreseeable harm as well as a clear determination of likely harms would force us to conclude that research, development, and diffusion of a product or process derived from biotechnology is ethically wrong. In all cases, one conclusion that can be reached is that everyone involved in research, development, marketing and adoption of biotech products is responsible for the results of their actions; thus, each individual has a responsibility to consider a broader range of values and goals that effect and are effected by the biotechnology effort.
Jeffrey Burkhardt is Director of the Ethics and Policy Studies Program in the Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences at the University of Florida. Though trained as a philosopher, he holds an appointment as Associate Professor in the Food and Resource Economics Department, where he teachers courses in ethics, political philosophy, and the philosophy of economics, as they relate to agriculture and resource issues. He has published on a variety of topics in the area of applied philosophy/ethics.
Last edited by London on Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:26 pm

Linn,

We're waiting.....

Hey, do you own this site too> along with all the Tenessee people at Rhodes college?
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:35 pm

Linn,

How about a follow up on that H. lineatum:

Hypoderma bovis ¦ H. lineatum Warble Fly

or.....................

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index ... /71402.htm

or...........

looks like a trilobite, an artifact. Maybe this is what killed the dinasaurs, reconstructed in a lab.

Anything is possible, right?
http://www.trilobites.info/trilobite.htm


London,
That bacteria: wolbachia, is what the oncho carries around, besides the oncho lives in nodules, creates calcium deposits as it dies the skin, causes testicles to swell, legs to puff out around joints, can cause the instestines to go inside itself, volvulus, or twist.

So, it affects the whole body, skin nodules, lymph nodes, etc. Oncho relief to Africa about the same time Aids surfaced?



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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:55 pm

Lovely Linn,

How you doin? Here's what I got when I searched your title of that texan that was sick article-you know, the one where you posted no hyperlinks.....well, here is what I got back when I googled it:

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... +OF+A+CASE
Last edited by London on Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:00 pm

More on this:

Hypoderma

Hypoderma bovis, H. lineatum: Ox warbles or cattle grubs; heel or bomb flies

General Description: Adults are hairy flies without functioning mouth parts. Thus they do not feed. The abdomen has three bands of hairs, light yellow hairs toward the front, dark hairs in the middle and orange-yellow hairs at the rear. The name "bomb flies" comes from the adults' habit of darting at the cattle. H. bovis is 15 mm. long, H.lineatum is 13 mm. The larvae or grubs are large with a segmented surface tapering at both ends.

http://ivomec.us.merial.com/cowcalf/par ... oderma.asp

Picture says a lot: about 8 stages, was modified also around 1968.

http://parasitology.informatik.uni-wuer ... 12.png.php

More on trilobites; Butterflies of the Sea
http://www.trilobite.com/

A living trilobite?
http://www.trilobites.info/triloimposters.htm

Chitins?:
http://epod.usra.edu/archive/epodviewer.php3?oid=255072

Records back to 1864 on this. And Morgellons might be the name, since no records from 1600s on.

the bristles are what keyed me into this. In the original Morgellons hairlike structures were pulled out of the children.

123,

Morgellons history itself is listed on http://www.morgellons.org. Look under historical information.

this chitin might have significance here, if we are to tie in with Morgellons on what we suffer.

There are hidden answers somewhere.

This is a game, folks, Who can find it first?

While the those with the answers, have front row seats. I wonder how much those seats cost?

More later:
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:19 pm

Here is a good one:

Totally not here, in USA, too icky:

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index ... 71800.htmj

another one from cattle, poor buggers:

Stephanofilaria stilesi is a small filarial parasite that causes a circumscribed dermatitis along the ventral midline of cattle. It has been reported throughout the USA but is more common in the west and southwest. The adult worms are 3-6 mm long and usually are found in the dermis, just beneath the epidermal layer. Microfilariae are 50 µm long and are enclosed in a spherical, semirigid vitelline membrane. The intermediate host for S stilesi is the female horn fly, Haematobia irritans ( Buffalo Flies). Horn flies feeding on the lesion ingest microfilariae that develop to the third-stage infective larvae in 2-3 wk. The infective larvae are introduced into the skin as the horn fly feeds.

Cutaneous stephanofilariasis


The dermatitis develops along the ventral midline, usually between the brisket and navel. With repeated exposure, the lesion spreads and often involves the skin posterior to the navel. Active lesions are covered with blood or serous exudate, while chronic lesions are smooth, dry, and devoid of hair. Hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis occur in the epidermis of the parasitized area.
Deep skin scrapings are macerated in isotonic saline solution and examined microscopically for adults or microfilariae. The microfilariae must be differentiated from microfilariae of Onchocerca lienalis , O gutturosa , and Setaria spp , which are much larger (200-250 µm), and Pelodera strongyloides (see Pelodera Dermatitis ), a small free-living nematode that is occasionally responsible for a moist, superficial dermatitis. The rhabditiform esophagus of P strongyloides is not found in filarial nematodes.
No approved treatment is available for S stilesi , but topically applied organophosphates (trichlorfon 6-10%, sid or on alternate days for 7 days) have proved effective against other species of Stephanofilaria .

-------------------------------

Now, if they can do skin scrapings on cattle, do we not deserve the same and more?

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Cutaneous habronemiasis is a skin disease of Equidae caused in part by the larvae of the spirurid stomach worms (Gastrointestinal Parasites Of Horses). When the larvae emerge from flies feeding on preexisting wounds or on moisture of the genitalia or eyes, they migrate into and irritate the tissue, which causes a granulomatous reaction. The lesion becomes chronic, and healing is protracted.


Habronemiasis, stallion

Cutaneous habronemiasis, horse


Diagnosis is based on finding nonhealing, reddish brown, greasy skin granulomas that contain yellow, calcified material the size of rice grains. Larvae, recognized by spiny knobs on their tails, can sometimes be demonstrated in scrapings of the lesions. Many different treatments have been used, most with poor results. Symptomatic treatment, including use of insect repellents, may be of benefit, and organophosphates applied topically to the abraded surface may kill the larvae. Surgical removal or cauterization of the excessive granulation tissue may be necessary. Treatment with ivermectin (200 µg/kg) has been effective, and although there may be temporary exacerbation of the lesions (presumably in reaction to the dying larvae), spontaneous healing may be expected. Moxidectin at 400 g/kg also appears to be active against Habronema spp in the stomach. Control of the fly hosts and regular collection and stacking of manure, together with anthelmintic therapy may reduce the incidence.

------------------------------------------------------------

3 species currently recognized the USA:

Come on now, we never had this? Horses, cows, get this. I think a view of the worm itself, along with the microfilaria would clue us in.

REMEMBER HELEN KELLER went blind from this!

And the Carter folks have changed course now, relationship to AIDS?

AWWWWWWWWWLinagin, lynn has your name on it.

Lineatum.......Lin eat em?

You are famous.

Clinical Findings:
O cervicalis has been associated with fistulous withers, poll evil, dermatitis, and uveitis in horses. However, because large numbers of the parasite are common in horses without these diseases, there is some debate about its role in the pathogenesis of these conditions.
Adults in the ligamentum nuchae induce inflammatory reactions ranging from acute edematous necrosis to chronic granulomatous changes, resulting in marked fibrosis and mineralization. Mineralized nodules are more common in older horses. Although lesions are found in these areas, presumably associated with dead parasites, it is generally agreed that fistulous withers and poll evil are not caused by O cervicalis infections.
Microfilariae concentrate in the skin of the ventral midline. Large numbers can be found in horses without dermatitis as well as in horses with dermatitis of the face, neck, chest, withers, forelegs, and abdomen. These lesions often include areas of scale, crusts, ulceration, alopecia, and depigmentation; they may be pruritic. The dermatitis may be associated with an immunologic reaction to dead and dying microfilariae. Although the pathogenesis of these lesions is unclear, treatment with microfilaricidal drugs may result in dramatic improvement. Allergic reactions to the bites of small flies may produce similar lesions or exacerbate microfilaria-associated dermatitis. Thus, diagnosis of Onchocerca -associated dermatitis may be based on responsiveness to microfilaricidal treatment.
Microfilariae also accumulate in the eyes of horses, but not all agree that a clear association has been made between microfilariae and equine uveitis ( Equine Recurrent Uveitis: Introduction) or other ocular lesions in horses.

-------------------------------------------------------
I think our whole family has this. My dad had a horse that died a slow death, possibly onchocerciasis, is in and on land in upper Michigan, probably all over Michigan now. That was years ago, and I do associate Muscular Dystrophy with this, folks. Saying this is Mendelian diseases, gene related, my foot, my foot, am a carrier of this which means I have this you rotten scientists and liars.

Just what does the worm eat? come on someone tell me this?
What disappears in Muscular Dystrophy? Protein, dystrophin. What is being used for gene replacement? for gene altering?

PROTEIN............PROTEIN>>>>>>>>>>>>PROTEIN
Proteomics,...............Bacteriophages...........Wolbachia........and Polio virus? What construct? Come one you smart a...... out there.

Ever seen anyone suffer of MD? Ever seen what it can to to whole generations? Anyone know why people of Spanish descent get this a lot?

Anyone know the connection between Oncho and Chagas? and Leish

All fly carrying diseases;

What is most prevalent in Egypt today? Horses and Cats? Cats became pets in Egypt first, how many horses in Egypt? What kinds?

It eats protein, what do horses, cattle, humans have a lot of?
What blinds, eats skin, turns stomachs over? Has been around a long time? Is ignored by US until Merck recognizes?

If animals have diseases, we have them, DAHHHHHHHHHHHHH.
The biggest lie told Americans.

Comeone you scientists out there, lets hear from you if not to argue against me?

Many people in my family, my ancestors, not my children because I adopted so as to not pass the Mendelian(?) gene on, the socalled REcessive gene transfer of Muscular Dystrophy. and extended family have huge lumps, nodules, many have died of cerebral palsy, ALS, muscular dystrophy and my father had an enlarged heart. The horse died on our property and we had flies galore.

How dumb is the CDC? or is this a maneuver?

Wolbachia the bacteria can live in the soil a long time.

Morgellons could be Onchocerciasis. And it is an old disease.........

skytroll
Last edited by Skytroll on Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:26 pm

Well Skytroll, keep on keepin on.....

loved those hyperlinks.....and those tribolites-whew.....i found something similar inside a fuzzball that was about the size of my pinky nail. but this thing was tiny. On one side, it looked just like the underside of a shrimp with its legs dangling. It also was flesh colored. But, on the other side,
it was flat. It had a tail! This hard looking flat side was all bright red with symetrical black dots going down it. I still have it too. It's floating in a cap of hydrogen peroxide as we speak.

skytroll, I have not tried this, but I heard we should soak in a hot bathtub with nothing added to the water for at least 5 minutes to open the pores.
Then, after the 5 minutes, add a big bottle of hydrogen peroxide to it. the big one> 32 oz. and then soak another 10-15.

This was from the mouth of Garth Nichols.
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Postby London » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:46 pm

Skytroll,

I found this photo off that cow site you posted above. I hope it opens to the photo. also, this is what I find around my house sometimes. but it is very tiny.....like about 1/4 size of ones pinky nail...it will crush up to a powder if handled too much. But mine have those ball like structures on the end of them but they are not white, like these eggs-they are black.

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/htm/bc/itgli01.htm
Last edited by London on Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:47 pm

So for Dr. Nichols to save face, he will look for the answer to this, and if he does find it<


I say we forgive him? Right?

I wonder about the hydrogen peroxide, we used to use linament when we were young. That has been banned, wonder why, so as not to heal anyone but to pass it on.

Anyway, it seems when I use it on lesions, it bubbles and hurts and yet it will raise the gell up and the eggs, pellets or whatever one wants to call it.

Hydrogen and calcium deposits, that is the dying microfilaria, the worm itself probably is the the blue lines we see, NOT capillaries, MR> KERN......

These are the oncho, and they live in lymph nodes too.

So, these blue lines are across my chest, extending into my shoulders, where I now have the pain whereas I cannot lift anything.

So, now if is modified, because of course USA CDC NIH does not think this contagious.

If a fly bites me who has this and bites you, you will get the disease I have. Blood related, tissue PROTEIN related.


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