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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:56 pm

Not to sound c"cocky " Helen, but I also thought that and posted about that too (somewhere On this strand too)

I'm talking about the wood/paper aspect of it here.

There is something ( a chemical in the pulp/ resin of the tree)

I do not remember for the life of me what it is called. But if you click onto my name or bio and go back to some of my first post, you will probably find it here.....if not let me know and I will retrieve it off my computer for you.
__________________________________

Now this was in my Nov. File but damn how it makes more sense to me today.......


The Genome of S-PM2, a “Photosynthetic” T4-Type Bacteriophage
That Infects Marine Synechococcus Strains


http://statgen.ncsu.edu/journal_club/pa ... organisms'
London
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Postby in_the_uk » Tue Apr 11, 2006 9:15 pm

[quote="Cilla"]Hi Helen,

I have had a read of your hypothesis of the feather, and the way in which you suggest it might shoot out from, or become elongated suddenly from a 'seed pod' does sound right.

[quote]

One thing that may support my hypothesis is that I had a "hive" on my knee that I messed with and something shot out of it. From the direction and velocity of the projectile is is reasonable to assume that it landed on my settee. Soem days later I found a cushion absolutely covered in fibres. I believe that the fibres were the payload of the missile. Most fibres were the thin wavy onses, but there was one red wavy one and 2 short stiff bright white ones and 1 feather. I think that the feather was the pod that discharged the fibres. If that is the case then the 2 stiff white ones must have grown whilst they were on the cushion. I don't know what their purpose was. That was the feather that I offeed to send to you in an earlier post.

Also, I have noticed that for me the colour of the fibres depends upon what colour is next to my skin. I was getting a lot of red fibres when I was wearing a red thermal. I have stopped wearing red and they changed to blue. I'll make a note when I change back to red.

Also, fibres that appear horizontally on my hands just appear horizontal. they don't emerge from a pore and elongate along my palm, they come up from my palm. They can't be coming from a pore. Perhaps they form from tiny parts that are on the surface of my skin which have cohesive properties.

Helen
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Postby in_the_uk » Tue Apr 11, 2006 9:19 pm

London wrote:Not to sound c"cocky " Helen, but I also thought that and posted about that too (somewhere On this strand too)

I'm talking about the wood/paper aspect of it here.

There is something ( a chemical in the pulp/ resin of the tree)


Ed found that by rubbing some bark chipping on his overalls and skin that he got temporary relief. Before he went big time with the vinegar.

He also thinks that the fibres, or some kind of dust, hides in paper tissues and towels.

Helen
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Postby John Kern » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:04 pm

in_the_uk wrote:
Also, I have noticed that for me the colour of the fibres depends upon what colour is next to my skin. I was getting a lot of red fibres when I was wearing a red thermal. I have stopped wearing red and they changed to blue. I'll make a note when I change back to red.



Maybe not all fibers are part of the disease. Your clothing actually contains millions of fibers itself, as part of it's function of keeping you warm. Occasionally some of these fibers come loose and end up on your skin, or lodged in lesions.

-John
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Postby in_the_uk » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:40 pm

[/quote]

Maybe not all fibers are part of the disease. Your clothing actually contains millions of fibers itself, as part of it's function of keeping you warm. Occasionally some of these fibers come loose and end up on your skin, or lodged in lesions. [/quote]

John, No. The red fibres come up from the palms of my hands when I apply an irritant (matchbox madness). There is no way that they have come from anywhere other than my hands. Sorry to be so assertive and self assured about it, but I know the palms of my hands like the back of my hands :D

Helen
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Postby in_the_uk » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:42 pm

any one in the uk:

Patient's Charter http://www.pfc.org.uk/medical/pchrt-e1.htm

DRUGS AND MEDICINES
You have the right to be prescribed appropriate drugs and medicines. If you fall within certain categories including being a pensioner, a person aged 60 or over, a child under 16 or under 19 in full time education, a pregnant or nursing mother, suffering from one of a number of specified individual conditions, or on income support or family credit, you have a right to get your medicines free.

Helen
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Postby London » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:54 pm

Hi John,

Are you new with posting here? Today is the first time I've seen your name.

Do You attend the TED Conventions with Jurvetson?

If you run with that crowd, you will not win, Please elaborate on yourself if you will.

London
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Postby London » Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:55 pm

Viruses, Microorganisms, and Algae

Most genetic modification of viruses intended for environmental release has focused on baculoviruses (Cory 2000). Nontransgenic baculoviruses are already used for biological control of insects (Box 3), and researchers have tried to increase their efficiency by inserting genes that express toxic proteins, such as insect-specific scorpion toxins (Maeda et al. 1991). To date, work with transgenic baculoviruses has taken place under contained conditions or in small-scale field tests, and no baculoviruses have been released commercially.

Transgenic bacteria and yeasts are used widely to manufacture biologically-based products in medicine, food processing, and agriculture (e. g., pesticides), but most of these GE products are produced indoors. For example, transgenic Escherichia coli that produce human insulin have replaced animal-derived insulin for medical uses; also, genetically engineered bacteria produce rennet, which is used commonly by cheese processors in the USA and elsewhere. Bovine growth hormone produced by transgenic bacteria has been used to increase milk production in many US dairy farms. Transgenic microorganisms are being developed for bioremediation of toxic compounds (Box 4), and for removing excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Experimental field tests of microorganisms intended for release into the environment include bacteria with visual markers, biosensors of toxic chemicals, insecticidal properties, and reduced virulence.

Production of micro-and macroalgae is an important sector of world aquaculture, and there is increasing interest in developing transgenic algae for applications such as food, animal feed, polysaccharides (e. g., carrageenan), pharmaceuticals, fuel, and bioremediation (e. g., Stevens and Purton 1997, Ask and Azanza 2002). Transgenic unicellular algae are being developed as a way to deliver vitamins, vaccines, and growth hormones to shrimp, fish, chicken, and other animals (R. Sayre, pers. comm. to A. Snow).

http://www.esa.org/pao/esaPositions/pdf ... st2004.php
____________________________

Is this NOT what I've said all along?!
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Postby London » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:02 pm

AND DON'T MISS THIS ONE:

Potential Environmental Impacts Associated With the Introduction of the Transgenic Organism

A DNA fragment from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster was combined with DNA material from the bacterium Escherichia coli to produce a plasmid containing a section of DNA entitled lacZ. This lacZ construct is well known and has been incorporated into several transgenic plants and bacteria that have been released into the environment. Plasmids containing lacZ were mechanically vectored into the ovaries of gravid WPM females by needle microinjection, and subsequent analyses documented that the lacZ construct resided in two copies on the host chromosomes for at least the next 120 generations and that the lacZ construct is chromosomally inherited in a Mendelian manner. Bioassays of the transgenic WPM demonstrated that the lacZ construct was not expressed, that is, did not direct protein synthesis or any other process, and thus serves only as a molecular marker. Laboratory experiments also confirmed that possession of the lacZ construct in the transgenic forms did not alter temperature and humidity tolerances or diapause characteristics as compared to the nontransgenic forms (Appendix A, Sect. 13b).
The proposed field trial as presently designed should provide an adequate degree of both physical and biological containment. The test site is surrounded by fencing with a locked gate and limited entry authorization. The movement of people, equipment, and biological materials into and out of the site will be closely monitored, with procedures in place to minimize the risk of escape of the transgenic organism. To minimize the possibility of accidental transport of WPM out of the test site by project workers, protective clothing will be worn and then retained on site for subsequent use, with eventual removal of the clothing from the test site preceded by soaking in 70% ethyl alcohol. Samples of plants with mites included will be removed from the test site in sealed containers and eventually autoclaved or deep-frozen before disposal. Mites remaining in the test area at the end of the growing season in October will be removed with their host plants and autoclaved (Appendix A, Sect. 13e).

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/brs/arthropod ... 02rea.html
London
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Postby London » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:13 pm

AND HERE'S j'S BLOG ON CYANOBACTERIA

http://jsblog.blogsome.com/2005/04/11/b ... neurotoxin


and here it is, I have been looking for this one for 2 months now:

WATERBORN ZOONOSES
http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_hea ... onoses.pdf
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Postby John Kern » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:20 pm

in_the_uk wrote:
John, No. The red fibres come up from the palms of my hands when I apply an irritant (matchbox madness). There is no way that they have come from anywhere other than my hands. Sorry to be so assertive and self assured about it, but I know the palms of my hands like the back of my hands :D

Helen


Do you see the fibers slowly coming out, or do they suddenly appear?

If they suddenly appear, then it's quite possibly they are jumping onto your hands from your clothes due to static electricity, then sticking there because of the irritant cream your are applying.

How long are the fibers?

John.
Last edited by John Kern on Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby John Kern » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:33 pm

London wrote:Hi John,

Are you new with posting here? Today is the first time I've seen your name.

Do You attend the TED Conventions with Jurvetson?

If you run with that crowd, you will not win, Please elaborate on yourself if you will.

London


I'm new to posting. I've been reading for a while, just jumping in now though.

I don't know what "the TED Conventions with Jurvetson" is referring to.

I may have Psoriasis, and I was doing internet research, and found the fiber connection.

John
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