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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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dormant fibers

Postby Barz » Thu Jan 12, 2006 4:44 pm

Tam Tam, If fibers are "dormant" and need living host, why do fibers grow on objects that are not living? ie, furniture, bedding etc?
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:14 pm

Barz,

Maybe they are nanoprobes. 21st Century.

http://www.nanoprobes.com/InSitu.html

first there is glitter, the gold, then there are black carbon bucky balls, then there are probing nanowires weaving it's way through our bodies, electron microscoping every cell and DNA transfering any disease, any gene. For identification?
for inseminating antigen? Could go either way. The ultimate identification.

Maybe far off, but, I do believe there is something nonorganic that starts the ball rolling incorporating bacteria, worms, insects. Beyond swarming Tam Tam?



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Postby C3 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:49 pm

informative:
Cyano/ fungus

Amphibian Fungal Diseases in Far North Queensland - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
Over the past few years, there has been a lot of publicity in the media about
frog declines and, in particular, the role that disease has had in causing ...
http://www.fdrproject.org/pages/disease.htm - 29k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten
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Postby C3 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:55 pm

Fibers?

Please read the article about cellulose the most abundant macro molecule etc.

Over reaction could relate to the science of Pavlov.
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Postby Cilla » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:55 pm

Hi all,

This forum's posts are written at a very high level, which is of course because you are so intelligent and educated in this very complex area of experimental microbiology, and how certain theories might relate to Morgellon's or the fiber disease.

I wish that I'd paid greater attention to scientific studies at school, because knowledge and understanding are power, and this particular specialist knowledge is what is required if this new disease (if this is what it is) is to be beaten.

London, your posts are excellent, and I have learned a lot from reading them, but the actual mechanics of cloning in this area eludes me. Could I run a hypothetical scenario past you of what I think happens, and would you be good enough to tell me where I have misunderstood, or what I might have left out?

Hypothetical Scenario.

A few scientists engage in the experiment of trying to fuse together cells from cyanobacteria and a major parasitic protozoa. Does a protozoa only have one cell? If so, does this mean that some of its DNA is removed, and some of the cyano DNA is joined to it? Is this what fusion means? Tam tam mentioned something about combination with variant glycoprotein - what does variant mean in this context?

Is all of this done in a petri dish, or a test tube? If this fusion is successful, is this when they are concerned with lysis, (which I thought ? meant cell wall death), but I think Tam tam said it had something to do with the free flow of DNA and is related to fission and multi lineage differentiation (whatever these may be).

Then, (I think), something else is added to the new creation, and this has some relation to a gene that codes for mold in, e.g. a nematode. Is this gene introduced to the clone by a virus? Or is a nematode cell part of the clone? Is three usually the maximum number of organisms that can be cloned together? Tam tam said something about coccoid, which I think may relate to the shape of the bacteria, but could mean something else entirely.

How is the lepidoptera added? Is a cell taken from a caterpillar, or is a butterfly egg cloned with the cyano? Is the reason for possibly using multi-nucleated cells of the Langerhans type so that more things than two or three can be cloned in one experiment?

I think that you said something about a nematode being identified as elegans. Did this possibly grow from a cloned experiment? Does this mean that a fully fledged nematode can grow in the body, even though it was introduced at a much earlier stage, e.g. an egg that was cloned with the cyano and protozoa?

If this growth to a full sized creature, (and I am thinking principally of the lepidoptera caterpillar here) is possible, subsequent to someone being infected with cloned bacteria, it is of immense clinical importance that this is stated. Alternatively, (and I know that the colours, the sensing antennae, have been remarked upon), is it possible that the hairs of the adult lepidoptera butterfly or moth can be present? Of course, I understand that no-one may know the answer to this, or it may be that my questions in the last two paragraphs are silly, and that this could not happen in this way. If either of the preceding is your thoughts, please say so. You won't hurt my feelings or anything, because this level of science is not part of my life.
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Postby C3 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 6:11 pm

random recombination

source code cyano
to step up to gametes = trypanosoma

a phylogenetic line seems to run trough the concept.
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Postby C3 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:19 pm

lepidoptera, butterfly

keywords: lepidoptera, butterfly, wing pattern, DNA



Butterfly Wings Key To Morphological Evolution - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
The next step in understanding the genetics of butterfly wing patterns, they note,
... in DNA sequences that correlates with variability in color pattern. ...
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/ 20020211025738data_trunc_sys.shtml - 25k - 10. Jan. 2006 - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten
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Postby C3 » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:25 pm

and another:


BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Scientists make a butterfly glow - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
The genetically modified African butterfly glows luminous green in the dark and
is part of a project to understand how wing patterns emerge. ...
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3499484.stm - 33k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten
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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:38 pm

Tam

Doesn't there have to be something inorganic to make this work?

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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:42 pm

Gore knows about the frogs. If you put a frog in hot water, he will jump out right away. If you put him in cold water and slowly heat it up, the frog will never know. His analogy for what? Who is behind this? Our environment man.

People wake up.............UN said 50 years was enough. That is one side of coin. The other is to produce the catalyst to make that happen.

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Postby Skytroll » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:45 pm

We haven't found a cure yet, have we Dr. Stein?

This topic should be all over the news. And soon it will be come h.....or high water.


21st Century.............

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Postby Cilla » Thu Jan 12, 2006 8:07 pm

Hi Barz,

If the fibers are made up of hyphae (even partially) these can survive for many years, on paper for example. They adapt by ingesting whatever is to hand, which they can expel later. This is why, if a dermatophyte infection is an integral part of the fiber disease, maybe because of the inclusion of a giant mold cell in the cloning experiment, or maybe because it is a secondary infection opportunistically superimposed on the original infected scalp lesions, this quality (and others possessed by dermatophytes) should be taken very much into account.

Is there not more than one type of 'fiber' in this disease? Some are apparently needle sharp, and move purposefully, like the ones that attacked London from her mirror. It was then as if she felt them almost sewing in a pre-determined line along her subcutaneous tissue, and she was aware of this tissue being elevated while this was going on. From what I've read, this is exactly what must happen as part of the overall apparently well organised preliminary (or thereabouts) strike of this organism of many parts.

I've heard of people managing to remove (by gentle but firm 'antiseptic'* combing), the different fibers (later in the disease process), and of the tissue sometimes being elevated at that time, but then suddenly releasing what seemed to be a foul-smelling gas from the scalp. Great relief was experienced by them once the rogue fibers, (some of which are indeed inert, ? old ones that have served their purpose, now being utilised by the 'management' skills of this organism as space occupying lesions), and the 'gas' had been removed or had escaped.
*If the hair is tangled, it has to be combed. Use only individual, frequently replaced, and very clean combs, and wipe teeth thoroughly with an antiseptic wipe after each sweep through the hair. Ensure that all detritus and debris from the scalp lands in a lined bin strategically placed below you. When finished, double bag, and put out in the rubbish. Any stray fibers or hair must be caught up by sellotape, or a lint roller, immediately, including those that may land on clothing, furnishing, or bedding.

Some whitish fibers/(? worms) undulate like cobras, e.g. on a comb, and move towards a finger held before them. They seem to have some kind of insect-like nervous system, because certain systemic drugs appear to kill them, a process that has apparently been observed by them being darker in hue and 'collapsing' or else 'fitting' before dying on the comb. Some individuals, after removing the 'writhers', have carefully and gently flicked a cigarette lighter to the heads of the live ones on a comb, and the undulation is no more. Obviously, this technique is not advised when alcohol, or flammable insecticides, have previously been applied to the area.

Some of the fibers do not seem chitin like, but are apparently made up of cellulose. As Tam tam said, this is one step removed from chitin, so these would be more inert, (as I think he means they have not progressed towards their intended goal). You must still remove them, though, because the body apparently has difficulty in expelling cellulose from lesions, not having expected to grow such in the first place.

Do not allow these invaders to have their own way in their management system and communication between parts. The fluke shaped nematodes (like calloused skin) apparently grow in a layered fashion, (not unlike corn formation by the sounds of it), and, (according to Cliff Mickelson and the scientist who has written very clear accounts of all of this to him), the soft white worms, or slugs without shells, are to be found beneath. They do write something of sticky film or mucus being released by this parasite, which may well have a lot in common with Tam tam's account of the quorum sensing bacteria's film.

Some writers have commented on the similarity between this condition and one not usually seen in Western countries. I do not know about that, but you all know what I am going to say now. Contact Dr Schwartz, and, if prescribed for you, take his protocol.

I hope that none of you high flying scientists are offended by what you may think of as common sense approaches to hygiene in the face of infection. It has been my experience that medical doctors (in their private lives, I don't mean before attending to sick people) are not always as assiduous as they might be in what could be called infection control in the home, and then they wonder why they get ill! That's okay when it's just a minor 'bug', but even they will take all of this very very seriously, once the facts are made public.
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