Login

Join for Free!
117148 members


The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

Moderator: BioTeam

Postby London » Sat Dec 03, 2005 4:31 pm

Tam Tam,

After much ado, I'm going to say the C-3 is THREE types
of Cyanobacteria.
C-7 would have been more appropriate. Found quite a few and you know what? They look just like the fiber balls, the green "alive-looking" grass blades and even the Chitin. BUT THEY ARE NOT CHITAN-THEY ARE LICHEN
Earlier last evening I found an oblong piece ofl LICHEN on the floor. When I viewed it I was quite surprised to see a mouth/eyes and two red
antennas?. The heat of the light bulb made it begin to melt. I had never seen this shape of Chitan before now-only the "pepper-looking ones", and certainly not one that had a face.

Now guess what I found? (NOTE: do not know if photo will come through)

lLICHEN
Lichens also have diminutive animals living on their surface. The most remarkable are tardigrades, minute creatures that belong to their own Phylum Tardigrada. Tardigrades are only about .25 mm long (1/100 of an inch). Although they are fairly common on mosses and certain lichens, they are rarely seen. They are called "water bears" because of their peculiar fat body with stubby legs bearing claws at the tips. When lichens become desiccated and dormant during drought periods, the tardigrades also go into a stage of suspended animation known as anabiosis. They pull in their legs, lose water, and roll up into a ball. When moisture is available again, the tardigrades swell and become active within a few hours. There are records of tardigrades emerging from a state of anabiosis lasting seven years.

Minute tardigrades (Phylum Tardigrada) are only about 0.25 mm long (1/100 of an inch). Although they are fairly common on mosses and lichens, they are rarely seen. They are called "water bears" because of their fat body with stubby legs bearing claws at the tips. The following illustration was enhanced from this photograph to show the legs and claws.
An illustration of a tardigrade that was enhanced from the above photograph to show the legs and claws.

Microscopic examination reveals that lichens are really fungi containing photosynthetic algal cells. In fact, they are called "lichenized fungi" by mycologists (people who study fungi). The lichen body is called a thallus, and is composed of intertwined fungal filaments. Lichens are conveniently grouped into 3 characteristic growth forms. Foliose lichens have a leaf-like or lobed thallus, loosely attached to the substrate by root-like rhizines or by a central stalk-like umbilicus. Fruticose lichens have an intricately branched upright or pendulous thallus. Crustose lichens are low-growing, with the entire thallus firmly attached to the rock or other substrate. The thallus of crustose lichens may be squamulose (composed of crowded, overlapping scales) or areolate (cracked into numerous angular sections like a dried lake bed).

The cyano are : :** Mixture of Cyanobacteria from microbial mat community. The type I posted to you the other day.
** Unidentified filament. Is it made of diatoms, desmids, cyanobacteria, or the unknown?
** Planktothrix agardhii with a swollen terminal cell. I believe that the swollen terminal cells are fungal (chytrid) fruiting bodies (sporangia) as hyphae have been observed running the length of similar trichomes.


Tam Tam,
I have more but wanted your guidance as whether this is correct OR must I deduce
Them?

One last thing I would like to share is the strangest flying object even though I know
I will deduct it is:

Whirling Nut (Gyrocarpus) Flying through the air is another effective adaptation for fruit and seed dispersal by plants. Airborne seeds have several ingenious methods of flying through the air, including whirling like a helicopter, gliding, and floating like miniature parachutes with tufts of fine hairs. Of all the types of "helicopter seeds," those of Gyrocarpus are the most remarkable.

Again, Sorry I do not know how to correctly post pictures.

Sincerely,

London
Last edited by London on Sat Dec 03, 2005 6:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Regarding Scotland

Postby GregV » Sat Dec 03, 2005 4:50 pm

I've often wondered where my personal infections hay have come from, No clue? Gone back and forth.
But my father was a Sub-Base Military man, as a child I started school in Danoon, Scotland (hope I spelled it right).
I was in Groton, Connecticut by New London about the time Lyme started to unfold.
Bullseye rash on stamach back then, (no-one knew what Lyme was then).
other places
Norfolk, West Virginia..........., Charlston, South Carolina, spent one or 2 weeks in Ontario Canada, but the rest of time in San Diego,CA
Born with Legperthese, (I know I messed that one up) a right hip, hole in it, so called miraculously filled in, but follow up and x-rays every 6 months till age 9 at these various Sub-base city military hospitals.

Sincerely,

Greg
GregV
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:12 pm

Postby London » Sat Dec 03, 2005 4:51 pm

Skytroll

I know you did not ask me but I wanted to share this with you.......

Bacteria which sense the Earth's magnetic field

Max Planck researchers uncover how a nanoscale 'compass' inside bacteria orients them to the Earth's magnetic field
The entire bacterium is oriented like a compass needle inside the magnetic field. Until now, it was not clear how the cells organise magnetosomes into a stable chain, against their physical tendency to collapse by magnetic attraction. But using modern molecular-genetic and imaging processes, researchers from the Max Planck Institue for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany have identified the protein responsible for creating the magnetosome chain. The scientists showed that this protein aligns the magnetosomes along a cytoskeletal structure which was previously unknown. This points to evidence that genetics regulate the magnetosome chain exactly. The structure is one of the most complex that has ever been found in bacterial cells. It is comparable to organelles that, until now, scientists had only been familiar with in higher organisms.

Sincerely,

London
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am


Response to "What are your Credentials? Tell us Who YO

Postby GregV » Sat Dec 03, 2005 4:57 pm

I've often wanted to respond to thes statements...

What are your Credentials? Tell us who you are? Hugh? You offer no proof? Put up or shut up!!!

Every time these gifted people speak they tell you WHO THEY ARE.
They tell their credentials, and have put up.

Thanks so much to all of you,
Greg
GregV
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:12 pm

Postby Been there » Sat Dec 03, 2005 6:29 pm

My Son just sent me this link. He has this disease, is in denial. He sleeps with a mask, I noted last week he has nose bridge is thickened considerably by the false skin. I mentioned it and he became angry. I hope this indicates he is reading the literature.
http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/ ... /7429/1430
On another note, Londen, you asked about how many may might have this.
On Easter Sunday,my wife, three grown children and their mates, five grandchildren and I met at a large cafateria. It uses heat lamps for food warming, many of them one over every hot food item. I noticed white flakes flying by me, I turned and looked back, there were maybe 50 behind us, the flakes were flying from everyone in the line. I pointed it out to my family. They ignored it. All but on 16 year old grandaughter think I am insane in believing this. From seeing the flakes, heading towards the IR, fast, with a purpose, I can only assume 100% is possible.
Been there
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:06 am
Location: 39º 8' 44" n 86º 41' 42" w

Clarify, I've always wanted to respond to these statements!

Postby GregV » Sat Dec 03, 2005 7:58 pm

In response to "I've always wanter to respond to these statements"
I'd like to clarify
I was not asking those questions to TamTam, London, and all wondering.

I was referring to the others who made such comments, questions, and provoking propaganda from the previous pages of the discussion.

Sorry for not being more clear
Sincerely,
Greg
GregV
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:12 pm

Postby London » Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:17 pm

Been There,

I believe you. I saw where you had posted about IR a while back. But I just don't understand that part of it. I learned a lot from your other post.
Have you yourself tried the pan of water under your bed like your mother used to do?

and Been There, what is your take on the IR?

Thank you. The photos were really good too.

Duh... Hey Been there, Okay, I understand it now. The microorganisms will flock to it.

Sincerely,

London
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Postby London » Sun Dec 04, 2005 1:44 am

Okay, so we know E.Coli is involved. A rat, a christmas tree and right now, I wish a stick of dynomite! Have a good rest of weekend everyone!

London
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Heat seeking organisms that have a seemingly random cycle

Postby Been there » Sun Dec 04, 2005 2:13 am

I see at varying times particles, especially white flake like substances that are attracted by any IR source. Anything from far IR, a 35º C water bath to a Thousand watt projector, a quartz halogen lamp, well, it is unpredictable. When I point a 10 watt quartz Halogen lamp upwards, sometimes I witness myriads of them literally flying towards it from 360º around it and from floor to ceiling. No matter what angle or direction they approach, when they sense the heat, they immediately go straight up. Most manage only 10 CM or so then fall. A few veer away, a few manage to keep going up. A hair dryer, used backwards, causes the organisms to come out of hair follicles and go to the tip of hairs. Also, anytime I have left a slide in a microscope while viewing a filament, I find they have detached from the filament and are lined up along the edge of the slide. These organisms are on all filaments here. They cause random movement of the filaments.
I assume they are what make the shapes in the filaments. I have seen thousands of tree limbs, branches, etc. with multiple turns of filament wrapped around them. This causes the growth to cut the bark killing the portion past their location. I actually first witnessed this at Perdue University.
I will use tunable sources of radiation to verify the actual range. I also wish to determine why this is so random. It may very well be they require moisture and they are active any time the relative humidity is above a certain point. I have eliminated attraction by electrostatic, electromagnetic, etc. means, it is seemingly the IR component of a source. I find approximately 95% of the filaments have positive or no net charge, the rest a negative net charge. So little time, so much to do.
Been there
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:06 am
Location: 39º 8' 44" n 86º 41' 42" w

coincidence????

Postby Sabrina » Sun Dec 04, 2005 2:25 am

"I was in Groton, Connecticut by New London about the time Lyme started to unfold."

Dear Greg,
With myself included, you are the third person to mention that they were in the Groton/New London area. I am a Coast Guard vet and was stationed there. Hum????? Coincidence?

Peace,
Sabrina
User avatar
Sabrina
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 8:03 pm

Groton, Connecticut

Postby GregV » Sun Dec 04, 2005 4:47 am

:shock: Sabrina,

Now you are really moving me,

Do you mind my asking, you must be older than me, because I'm 47.
I was only about 8-11 years old then.
How old are you?

You don't have to say more but this definately has captivated my interest as to places of distribution.

I'll probably not talk here much more at this sight, there are others who are much more worthy of the time, content, and substance here,
and I feel I am only getting in the way,

I can talk to you at the other place or perhaps direct e-mail. Talk to you later,

Thanks to all here, especially TamTam, London, Southcity, Sabrina, Cliff, Greema, and all else.

Sincerely,
Greg
GregV
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:12 pm

Postby Sabrina » Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:31 pm

See what I mean? It spreads quickly and the poor medical professionals getting this are clueless.

Mysterious Rash Puzzles Hospital Staff

http://www.nbc5i.com/health/5438574/detail.html

POSTED: 5:45 pm CST November 30, 2005
UPDATED: 6:02 pm CST November 30, 2005

FORT WORTH, Texas -- Doctors at Harris Methodist Hospital in Fort Worth said they were mystified by a strange rash that spread among about two dozen hospital employees.


Staff dermatologists and specialists brought in from outside Harris Methodist have not determined the nature of the rash.

"There is some concern about what we are treating," Dr. Joe Prosser said. "The reason I say that is that some of the rashes that we have had examined simply do not conform to what we would consider textbook rashes. We've asked the dermatologists to come over and take another look."

The first cases broke out a few weeks ago when an infected patient was admitted from a different medical facility. The affected patient and hospital staff members initially were treated for scabies, a contagious condition caused by parasitic mites.

Public health officials said the population or other patients at Harris Methodist are not at risk of contracting the unknown rash.


NOT AT RISK????? :shock: Believe me, everyone is at risk.

Peace,
Sabrina
User avatar
Sabrina
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 8:03 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Human Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron