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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby C3 » Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:22 pm

reference:

From the Cover: Plant-like traits associated with metabolism of ...
Extant trypanosomatid parasites, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania, ...
6PGDH branched closely to its homolog from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. ...
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/100/3/1067 - Similar pages
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Postby C3 » Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:42 pm

reference:


[PDF] THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF MODEL ORGANISMS
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
cyanobacterium symbiont, forming the origin of plastids on the plant lineage and
possibly on other ... such as Plasmodium (malaria), Trypanosoma (try- ...
evo.bio.psu.edu/hedgeslab/ Publications/PDF-files/140.pdf - Similar pages
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Postby befour » Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:56 pm

dear j jill

It was very painful when it first began, about four days before the picture was taken. When it first appeared, it resembled a donut, very swollen and red. As the "things" came to the surface, it was less painful.

I went to my GP two days after the picture, it looked even worse at that time, it was mostly dark red and black. She finally believed what I had been telling her for FOUR years, she could see it for herself! In fact, she is the one that suggested a referral to an ID dr.

Don't have the appt. yet, should hear from her next week.

All of my lesions are on my head, what I used to refer to as my scalp - where I HAD hair!

The lesions are usually in a row and develop into a thick ridge, then the fibers take over and my hair comes out. The lesions are very deep, they feel like they go all the way down to my skull.

If you draw a line from the center of my forehead down to the nape of my neck, about 2 inches wide, that's the main ridge (all the hair is GONE!) Then, draw a line from ear to ear, around the back of my head, about an inch wide, this is where the new lesions are starting.

From my ears to my temples, on both sides, there is no hair. I don't know what to do to stop it from spreading!! How do I get rid of these BUGS?!! I AM READY TO TRY ANYTHING!!! (before "it" takes over my brain!)

I feel like I am in one of those '50's sci-fi movies, where the aliens take over our brains . . .

Thank you so much for your concern, my best to you also!

befour
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Postby befour » Tue Jan 03, 2006 9:18 pm

thank you C3-


Any ideas for treatment?


sinerely-

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fair warning

Postby Sabrina » Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:00 am

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Postby Cilla » Thu Jan 05, 2006 8:17 pm

Hi Faith,
I am sorry that you are in such discomfort. If you think that you have nematodes or helminths (as opposed to a fungal infection such as ringworm) then you should see a doctor, such as Dr Schwartz. If there is any infection or infestation under the skin it has to be treated with prescribed internal medication.

External remedies can certainly help, but only as an adjunct to the prescribed medication. E.g., antifungal shampoos, or baby shampoos can help when applied to external lesions, but must not be taken internally as they can kill.

Some people with skin conditions say they are greatly helped by flotation therapy, where salt is used. I do not advise eating too much salt, as this can be very dangerous, especially for people with certain medical problems. I do not think it would necessarily kill the worms anyway, because worms survive on meat, e.g. pork, that has been preserved in salt. No, if you have worms, you need to have anthemotic medication prescribed, as per Dr Schwartz's protocol.
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clinical study

Postby Sabrina » Thu Jan 05, 2006 10:40 pm

This was sent out some weeks back but I wanted to post it here incase anyone missed it.

The good news is that we are getting closer to getting a clinical study going. (about time ah?)

Special thanks to Randy S. Wymore, Ph.D.

Please note that this article says,”Morgellons disease, a little-known and often discounted illness, lacks the solid scientific data needed to point to a definitive cause.”

Dear tamtam,

I cannot dispute that some of what you say correlates to this condition, however you give no references to support what you are saying with any verifiable solid scientific data. Can you help me find this?


http://centernet.okstate.edu/whatsnew/rounds/2005/1005.html

In the word of bizarre symptoms that mark Morgellons disease, patients speculate about how they got it.

An athletic young swimmer who trained in murky bay waters wonders if that is the cause of symptoms. A patient living near a marsh speculates that contaminated dust from dredging is to blame. Others suspect a link to Lyme disease. Whatever the cause, they are sick and do not know why.

Morgellons disease, a little-known and often discounted illness, lacks the solid scientific data needed to point to a definitive cause.

That soon may change as Randy S. Wymore, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and physiology, looks for answers. He is taking on the research challenge as volunteer director of research for the Morgellons Research Foundation.

According to the foundation, the disease began to appear in 2002. Patients complain of itching and feeling like bugs are crawling on their skin, stinging and biting. Many suffer from fatigue, or have trouble concentrating. Even more horrifying, their skin often develops blistering lesions that shed black seed-like particles, and sprout colored, fibrous filaments.

Neurological symptoms include numbness, tingling, itching, burning, or peripheral neuropathy. Sufferers sometimes are diagnosed with delusions of parasitosis (a belief that they have parasites) by skeptical doctors who have no solid scientific data that Morgellons Disease is real. Treatment may consist of saying, “Just don’t scratch it.”

“Health care providers are shooting in the dark as to how to treat it. Antibiotics seem to help some, but if they are stopped the symptoms come back,” Wymore says. In coordinating research efforts, he sees a research challenge and a chance to help. “I am doing this partly from scientific curiosity, but also with real empathy toward sufferers.”

The foundation has registered approximately 2,500 families worldwide. Clusters of sufferers are located in Texas, California and Florida. Wymore says Oklahoma has at least a dozen possible cases.

Questions surround Morgellons. Is it a real disease, and if so, what causes it? Is it one disease, or a complex syndrome?
“We are keeping every possible cause open for examination. It could be viral, parasitic, fungal, bacterial, or environmental contamination. We just do not know. There is not enough evidence,” Wymore says. He will put together a scientific advisory board, and hopes to interest other researchers in unraveling the medical mystery.

To find the cause, he will look first for any new or unusual bacteria. Shed materials from patients will be analyzed for unusual microbial species by amplifying any non-human DNA. Wymore says he will use PCR to amplify DNA, analyze the sequence and get an idea what kind of microorganism, if any, exist.

If no organism emerges, he will look for a viral cause. Wymore says this initial investigation will attempt to establish a rationale for more involved studies. After approval by the Human Subjects Institutional Review Board, samples will come directly from patients in a clinical setting.

Peace,
Sabrina
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survey w/ map and listing of ages & professions

Postby FiberSymptoms » Fri Jan 06, 2006 1:02 am

------------------------------------------
Last edited by FiberSymptoms on Sat Dec 02, 2006 10:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Cilla » Fri Jan 06, 2006 7:26 pm

Hi again Faith,
I misspelled the broad type of medication that you could ask a doctor to prescribe in yesterday's post. This is based on the protocol devised by Dr Schwartz, and, if you are unable to obtain a consultation with this physician, your doctor might wish to contact him once he or she has examined you. The type of drug that is used against helminths is known as the antihelminthic or anthelmintic group, of which there exist quite a few.
Dr Schwartz includes other types of drugs within his protocol, such as antibiotics and a drug that acts against the nervous system of arthropods. I am not aware of the actual doses, or of when exactly he would advise drugs of a certain class to be given. E.g., he might not advise that certain drugs be given at the same time, or even on the same day. I am sure that he has worked out the best way to proceed with the regimen, although this may on occasions vary, depending on the clinical features that a given patient presents with.
This is why it is important to be examined by a medical doctor before such drugs, or any possible alternatives, are prescribed. Some medications should only be prescribed with caution, e.g. it might be necessary to order liver function tests, both prior to, and during the actual course of treatment.
Such caution is part and parcel of healthcare practice, and every treatment carries a degree of risk. So does doing nothing when treatment is required to cure a condition. In some conditions, a person's immune system can sometimes spring into action and a disease can be cured spontaneously, as has been recorded in some cases of tinea capitas. However, other conditions, such as helminth infections or infestations are not going to go away without the appropriate drugs. The literature suggests that not only is this the case, but that previously affected individuals do not seem to build up immunity to future attacks, (in countries where helminth infestations are commonplace).
There is no harm in doing the best you can meanwhile to deal with the lesions on the surface, or on your scalp. These must be kept as clean as possible, and secondary infection must be prevented.
I hope that you do see a doctor soon, and that you receive whatever treatment is necessary in order to resolve your condition. This might be a lot more likely now that the research mentioned in the post above is getting underway. Thank goodness!
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Postby C3 » Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:53 pm

The fiber disease constitutes an infection with a modified micro organism Base architecture represents a cyanobacterium fused with a trypanosoma like element. This base architecture will differentiate in a set commensal resembling micro organisms.

For preliminary and broad based scientific assessment you can read the article published in nature (model organism)

More specific and focused study could be done with a research budget based on a research proposal (...)

All You suffer from basically represents anti microbial resistance and the fact that infection with this type target may represent a multitude of ongoing research that yet has not been associated with the existence of this type stray target under the global population (...)

Public health services stay ignorant about the fact that the 21th century represents the 21th century (...)

A profitable point of departure?

Mycoplasma could be another fine example in the history of medical practice.

Certain type matter is comfortably reduced to a so called host pathogen interaction.

That the future only may yield (long life) suppressive therapy would be a logic deduction.

A cure is simply not profitable or difficult to provide.

Infection with this element can be cured but as it seems;
but only with a combination of (type last resort) therapeutical agents(...)

This may turn out to be a difficult point when later assessment would be conclusive about the fact that a significant percentage of the population will prove positive for this slow incubating pathogen but that only a percentage is highly symptomatic.

MRSA and the fact that some individuals are persistent carrier of this type micro organism is another fact (...)


Sincerely,

tamtam
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Postby C3 » Fri Jan 06, 2006 9:02 pm

[PDF] THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF MODEL ORGANISMS
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
cyanobacterium symbiont, forming the origin of plastids on the plant lineage and
possibly on other ... such as Plasmodium (malaria), Trypanosoma (try- ...
evo.bio.psu.edu/hedgeslab/ Publications/PDF-files/140.pdf - Similar pages
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are u sure?

Postby Sabrina » Sat Jan 07, 2006 7:07 am

UC Riverside Researchers Discover Model Organism For Studying Viruses that Affect Humans
August 18, 2005

Simple nematode has similar virus-fighting mechanism as humans and can be used in research

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – http://www.ucr.edu – Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have discovered that a simple worm, called C. elegans, makes an excellent experimental host for studying some of the most virulent viruses that infect humans.

The researchers published their findings in the Aug. 18 issue of the journal Nature in a paper titled, Animal virus replication and RNAi-mediated antiviral silencing in C. elegans.

http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headline ... leID=20643


Tamtam,

This is very new and cutting edge science. How do we explain the fact that some of us, including myself, have had this for decades?


Peace,
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