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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby J Jill » Mon Jan 30, 2006 11:38 pm

C 3,

A friend of mine died this past June. He had fatigue, chronic sinus problems,and the swollen elbow.

He had been in Cleveland Clinic several times. Once for over 5 days. The doctors couldn't determine what was wrong with him. At that time, he had
a problem with nose bleeds. They had to cauterize to get the bleeding stopped.

The doctors didn't give a DX but said that it was related to working in the yard- removing shrubs/trees with old bird nests.

They didn't acknowledge his swollen elbow or relate it to the problem but rather said that it was probably work related.

I've have carpal tunnel and my bones fracture easily but no swollen elbow. The docs had to re-do my bone density scan- they thought the equipment was broken/malfunctioning because my bones are so light.

I tried the link that you referenced but can't pull up the article. Please copy and paste the article?

Thanks in advance!


Greema and all,

I've been reading that folded proteins are related to CJD.
You mentioned just the other day, about folding amoebas
(Callus), and others have linked various articles and citations that
mention the folding of proteins/cells and so on.

Yesterday, I found this:

http://folding.stanford.edu/villin/

Fair use

Excerpt:
Simulations of the villin headpiece

The villin headpiece is a small, 36-residue alpha helical protein. It
has been heavily studied experimentally and by simulation since is
perhaps one of the smallest, fastest folding proteins. It has a
hydrophobic core made of 3 phenylalanines, but also has two groups (a
tryptophan and another phenylalanine) which are hydrophobic, but are
solvent exposed (for functional reasons). Duan and Kollman simulated 1
microsecond of MD time, in a ground breaking simulation. However,
since the folding time is on the order of 10 microseconds, it is not
surprising that they did not see it fold. Our simulations contain
hundred of microseconds of MD time, and we have seen 35 simulations
which have folded. Below, we detail the trajectory of one of these
simulations.

Read more here:

http://folding.stanford.edu/papers.html

Thoughts?
"When you dine with the devil, bring a long spoon."
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Postby Maggie Mae » Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:48 am

Any idea who and how NUSPA and MORGELLONS are connected at the basic core? I mean founding fathers, people on both sites in the inner sanctum? Really curious.

Mm
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the giving of information

Postby southcity » Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:58 am

ukguy wrote:
southcity wrote:to ukguy and others... Until the press begins giving this more attention he will not speed up the posting of info. also, if he knew of a cure, it would already be available. these are preliminary findings of which are very certain, but to find a cure is going to be a long bumpy road and require a huge "army" of scientists. I suggest pounding the press on this issue as well as sending out the certified letters discussed before in this thread.

take care,


Hi South,

I do understand there is no cure and there's a long road ahead.
I've been trying to talk to Microbiologists in the country in an attempt
to raise some awareness and maybe open a few doors. I don't want
to bombard as many people as I can at this stage since new information
is still being posted by TamTam - and perhaps one chance is all I'll
get to make my point. First impressions count.

I'm frustrated at the response I've had from some people I've spoken
with (Microbiologists) and I guess I was taking some of that out on TamTam, in the belief that he had more information that could help with the bigger picture.

Just had a bad day I guess :)

I'll keep at it...

Cheers




Hi, well I am certainly with you on this and have the same concerns, especially considering the 1 time visitors to my site and not seeing them return.. I have stated this to him several times.

But. we are in an area of expertise and crisis communication that I am left with no choice but to trust in the fact tamtam is much more knowledgeable about these things than I am. Here is some very very good reading and food for thought concerning risk communication. http://www.psandman.com/index.htm
more specifically here... http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/sar ... .html#s5c6
Southcity


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Then they laugh at you...
Then they fight you...
Then you win." - Mahatma Gandhi
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Postby J Jill » Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:00 am

Good points, Cilla.


Intersting news. It's from another board but goes to the 'new' info:

Cellulose in the Cyanobacteria!

Open up this link- great info/images

http://www.botany.utexas.edu/facstaff/f ... own/cyano/

Fair use

Cellulose synthesized by cyanobacteria may offer a new industrial resource for this biomaterial

Cellulose genes from cyanobacteria shown to be a likely source of genetic material for present day cellulose-producing crops such as trees and cotton

Cellulose genes from cyanobacteria provide clues to the early evolution of eukaryotic cells

========================================

The first conclusive evidence has been presented that cyanobacteria synthesize cellulose. Cellulose is a biopolymer that plants use as the primary building block for their cell walls and has economic significance because it is the major constituent of such familiar products as cotton, wood, and flax. The cyanobacteria are among the most ancient groups of organisms having existed for more than 3.5 billion years. Discovery of cellulose in cyanobacteria led to the use of sophisticated data mining from sequenced genomes of other organisms. This work has shown that the cyanobacterial genes for cellulose production are closely related to those genes in land plants. This strongly suggests that the genetic code for the major building blocks for cellulose production of land plants came directly from the cyanobacteria. The research furthermore supports the endosymbiotic hypothesis which states that at least 2.2 billion years ago, a singular event took place in which chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis in land plants, originated from a cellular ingestion or uptake of a cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria do not have chloroplasts, but they do have photosynthesizing membranes. The primitive cellular recipient of this endosymbiosis, also received the genes for cellulose assembly which eventually were transferred to the nucleus, the present day site for the genes of cellulose biosynthesis in land plants. Since cellulose is essential as a structural component to support plants on land, this event probably was key in leading to the initiation of plant life on land. The appearance of terrestrial plants from the oceans was a necessary event in the evolution of life as we presently know it. This research takes on added significance since it is now known that the earth's oxygen atmosphere originated from eons of photosynthesis by cyanobacteria. If cellulose synthesis were a primitive form of metabolism among the first life on earth, it may have played a major role in the survival of organisms in the harsh, early conditions of primordial earth. Cyanobacteria inhabit vast, incredibly diverse environments ranging from hyper saline waters to deserts which have never recorded rainfall. Discovery of cyanobacterial cellulose is significant because unlike plants, many cyanobacteria are able to use or "fix" nitrogen from the atmosphere and thus do not require nitrate-based fertilizers. Additionally, some nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are able to grow in salt water, which would eliminate the need for fresh water. Thus, cyanobacteria are an attractive potential new crop source for the industrial production of cellulose and would not require arable land. In large scale production, this new cellulose resource could reduce the depletion of conventional resources for timber and textiles.



Nobles is a second year graduate student with Dr. Brown in the Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Romanovicz is a research associate in the Brown laboratory.

For further information, contact Dr. Brown at [email protected] or (512) 471-3364.

The manuscript can be downloaded at the following URL:
http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/full/127/2/529

Below are some useful Links:
http://spider.jgi-psf.org/JGI_microbial/html/

http://www.kazusa.or.jp/cyano/cyano.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PMGifs/Genomes/micr.html


To download a movie showing gliding motility in Oscillatoria, click HERE file size-7.6 mbytes
right click and "save link as" will allow you to download the avi file.

This work was supported by a grant from the Energy Biosciences Division, Department of Energy DE-FG03-94ER20145, a Welch Foundation Grant F-1217 to RMB,
and the Johnson & Johnson Centennial Chair Fund at The University of Texas at Austin

Plant Physiol 2001 Oct;127(2):529-42

Cellulose in cyanobacteria. origin of vascular plant cellulose synthase?

Nobles DR, Romanovicz DK, Brown RM Jr

Section of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712.

Abstract

Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive
evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose in these organisms. Based on the results of x-ray diffraction,
electron microscopy of microfibrils, and cellobiohydrolase I-gold labeling, we report the occurrence of cellulose
biosynthesis in nine species representing three of the five sections of cyanobacteria. Sequence analysis of the genomes of
four cyanobacteria revealed the presence of multiple amino acid sequences bearing the DDD35QXXRW motif conserved in
all cellulose synthases. Pairwise alignments demonstrated that CesAs from plants were more similar to putative cellulose
synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme American Type Culture Collection
29133 than any other cellulose synthases in the database. Multiple alignments of putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena
sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and N. punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 with the cellulose
synthases of other prokaryotes, Arabidopsis, Gossypium hirsutum, Populus alba x Populus tremula, corn (Zea mays), and
Dictyostelium discoideum showed that cyanobacteria share an insertion between conserved regions U1 and U2 found
previously only in eukaryotic sequences. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the cyanobacterial cellulose
synthases share a common branch with CesAs of vascular plants in a manner similar to the relationship observed with
cyanobacterial and chloroplast 16s rRNAs, implying endosymbiotic transfer of CesA from cyanobacteria to plants and an
ancient origin for cellulose synthase in eukaryotes.



sample cover page


Electron microsopy-negative staining of cellulose from 6 species of cyanophyceae. Negative staining. Note the dark spots which are colloidal gold bound to cellobiohydrolase I which is specific for cellulose.


x-ray diffraction analysis of 4 cyanobacterial celluloses


Multiple alignment of amino acid sequences from 17 prokaryotic cellulose synthase homologues with CesA sequences from A. thaliana, G. hirsutum, Z. mays, P. tremulus x alba, and D. discoideum. The alignment demonstrates the presence of a CR-P region between the U1 and U2 domains present only in eukaryotic and cyanobacterial sequences.


Comparison of NJ and MP trees. The tree shown is a NJ tree subjected to 5000 bootstrap trials. Bootstrap values are shown as percentages with MP bootstrap values shown in parenthesis. Differences in the MP tree are denoted by bold lines (multifurcations), dashed arrow (variable position), and * indicates rooting at the base of the tree. Note the distribution of cyanobacterial sequences in the tree: 2 Sequences from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and N. punctiforme branch with vascular plants; 2 sequences from N. punctiforme and Synechococcus branch distantly with Thermotogales and Proteobacteria; and 3 sequences from Synechocystis, N. punctiforme, and Anabaena, which are most likely CSL proteins, group with Bacillus subtilus. The high bootstrap values support the validity of the tree.

The maximum likelihood phylogeny for the cellulose synthase sequences showing confidence values and the log likelihood. With the exception of D. discoideum (which groups with the Euryarchea in this tree), the relationships in this tree are nearly identical to those shown in Figure 6.




David is holding a Petri dish with Oscillatoria sp. The gliding trichomes aggregate to produce
macroscopically visible bundles
created October 15, 2001
Return to RMB Lab Page-Click HERE
Last edited by J Jill on Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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quorum sensing

Postby southcity » Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:04 am

I have a question hopefully that can be answered here. Might histamine release from our bodies be a pathway of communication, or quorum sensing, these microorganisms use. The reason I ask is I have been using Zyrtec for the last few days and it has done a fantastic job of keeping the symptoms down. if others confirm this aswell it could point towards treatment, at least I would think.
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Then they laugh at you...
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Then you win." - Mahatma Gandhi
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to j jill

Postby southcity » Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:19 am

good link you posted. I just wanted to point out that the video that this link of yours offered, (http://www.botany.utexas.edu/facstaff/f ... cillat.avi ) which was done by the university of texas, is of not so great quality as far as images are concerned, most especially when compared to the images given to us from tamtam. In fact, the images that tamtam has provided are among the best Ive seen after 4 years of looking into this stuff. literally thousands of slides and other microscope work have been looked at by me and none even come close. This alone has led me to give a considerable amount of trust in tamtam, as it seems the equipment used to make the video is world class technology. just a thought.
Southcity


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Postby J Jill » Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:32 am

Thanks,

As to the video- I can't download or view it. I did view the 4 minute video but the add-on won't work for me. I have DSL in case you wondered.

I posted the Texas link because it tied to what C3, et al, has been posting about.

http://tinyurl.com/7qe48

If you look at the lineage report at the link below, you'll see that Prototheca wickerhamii that TT mentions is one step below Proteobacteria:

Excerpt:
Comparison of NJ and MP trees. The tree shown is a NJ tree subjected to 5000 bootstrap trials. Bootstrap values are shown as percentages with MP bootstrap values shown in parenthesis. Differences in the MP tree are denoted by bold lines (multifurcations), dashed arrow (variable position), and * indicates rooting at the base of the tree. Note the distribution of cyanobacterial sequences in the tree: 2 Sequences from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and N. punctiforme branch with vascular plants; 2 sequences from N. punctiforme and Synechococcus branch distantly with Thermotogales and Proteobacteria; and 3 sequences from Synechocystis, N. punctiforme, and Anabaena, which are most likely CSL proteins, group with Bacillus subtilus. The high bootstrap values support the validity of the tree.
**
http://www.botany.utexas.edu/facstaff/f ... own/cyano/
Last edited by J Jill on Tue Jan 31, 2006 9:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby givemeabreak » Tue Jan 31, 2006 1:43 am

southcity wrote: In fact, the images that tamtam has provided are among the best Ive seen after 4 years of looking into this stuff. literally thousands of slides and other microscope work have been looked at by me and none even come close. This alone has led me to give a considerable amount of trust in tamtam, as it seems the equipment used to make the video is world class technology. just a thought.


Dreamworks Animation uses world class technology to produce outstanding images, too. Yet they are only a product of someone's overactive imagination.

Just another thought. :wink:
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Postby Barz » Tue Jan 31, 2006 2:58 am

Hi. Just want to let you know that I did have some communication with Malcolm Brown. He basically said that Cellulose is not produced by the human body, however we may have some microbes that produce cellulose in the body, which should respond to antibiotics. He was very suspicous of that possibility, however. He also stated that it should be reasonably logical for some environmental-safety company to isolate the micro organism, parasite, or virus or whatever is causing the problem.

(YEAH, OKAY That SHOULD be reasonably logical haahaahaa)

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Postby Skytroll » Tue Jan 31, 2006 3:49 am

J Jill and south,

I read somewhere that cyanobacteria was being used to clean up carbon dioxide.

I will go back and see where and who was instigating this.

I think it was being sprayed on the oceans.

Oh boy......I think you have something here.

Why would the Tx people be suspicious about this on our skin. Have they never thought that cyano is dangerous, in fact in fresh water it can kill dogs, if they drink it. It is here in Michigan. The purple plumes in Lake Michigan, I do believe are related
to a cyano type bacteria, algae blooming. Spores can get in air. Cyano can live anywhere, it seems.

Could cyano be the HGT (horizontal gene transfer) bacteriophage? Possibly?

They are using cyanob like it is a great product to be using for the cellulose. What are they studying this for? To make synthetic cotton, I read somewhere before on those sites.

This whole synthesizing of natural products, I believe is causing a whole host of problems for humans, water mammals, plants and insects.

Spores from the cyano? algae blooms protein to protein gene transfer? quorum sensing?

Gimme me a break,
How about isolating the bacteriophage that is causing the HGT to take place?
Think on that one.
Why are you being so cynical? Contribute, then!

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Postby Skytroll » Tue Jan 31, 2006 4:00 am

j jill, south, uk,

http://microbialgenome.org/organisms.shtml

DOE

different cyano used to clean up metal?

have seen this before.

but....am wonder about connect between ocean carrying stuff through salt water into fresh water.

Carrying the cyano from ocean is not cyano in fresh water. fresh water maybe enables the saltwater cyano to grow faster, hence the blooms when the temperature is just right.

We could have different types......if HGT takes place between saltwater algae and fresh water algae. I don't know......will look into that later.

Discussion was going on about this on LB board too.
coz?

Let's keep this rolling along the cyano, cellulose thing.

And the folding thing, prions, Dr. Pruisner has studied the prions.

Folding in the sense of synthesizing natural into computer? or for transport (electromagnetic)

Far fetched, I know but if all natural organisms are being synthesized, why? what is the outcome?

The next dimension? ha ha

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Postby Skytroll » Tue Jan 31, 2006 4:45 am

On this web site note where the fungi are and the algae are, amoebas, flagella, a ciliata.

And then note where worms are and bugs.

http://www.progressivegardens.com/knowl ... ology.html

I think we need to look at this, and then think how it would be synthesized. Since chemtrails are blocking the sun. The natural photosynthesis does not take place as it should.

Things are amiss. I am not playing a wild goose thing here, but, if we know what is natural, first, then go from there to what has been synthesized because of lack of sun. Possibly? Then, compare a true natural tree of life to the rosetta stone evolutionary tree of life. A flagella cannot just evolve.


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