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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby London » Sun Apr 23, 2006 7:55 pm

and, I forgot to tell Fiber Symptoms "Thank you", thanks for the links above....that was great!
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Postby Linn » Sun Apr 23, 2006 8:30 pm

London wrote:And Kudos for Sabrina sticking her neck out on the line by being persistant
with her honest and fair questions that prompted the "good/ Great Doctor

To write that to her!!!!!

____________________________

PS: To Lynne, That article was dropped off here for her to see.
Are you still not finished?

T. You

L-


not finished with what dear London? :

Oh you are such a sweet, sweet girl :!:
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
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Postby London » Sun Apr 23, 2006 8:45 pm

oh shut up Lynne! I love you and am glad you are back!!!

Wanna picture of me??? :)
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Here is some human worms, curtesy of the CDC:

http://elegans.swmed.edu/Nematodes/Huma ... todes.html
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Postby London » Sun Apr 23, 2006 9:03 pm

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TO sKY

Postby RANDY » Sun Apr 23, 2006 9:17 pm

pROVACHOL. CHEAP AND EASY TO CORRECT THE PROBLEM.
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Postby London » Sun Apr 23, 2006 9:51 pm

Randy,

If you do not want to answer here, please PM me. but I was wondering
about your Mum? How are her spirits today? Does she live close to you?

i think your outlook on Cancer really plays an impact on the disease......

also Randy, I wanted to know how she found out? Did she detect a lump herself? Or was it thru reg. mammograms?

I'm most interested b/c I have had severe problems in this area but after repeated sonograms and mammograms, they still do not know what my

tumors/ lumps are.....I know that it is def. not cystic breast disease...

no, no, not this.....it is way more painful and has taken the strangest of
shapes.......since it changes shapes/ they say it is not cancer. for cancer does not move around.

Hang tight and I hope you are near her. Do not hesitate to call upon us if we can be of assistance, I mean that!

london

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Here is a link to a thread group on C.Elegans

http://www.bio.net/hypermail/celegans/
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Postby London » Sun Apr 23, 2006 11:53 pm

Check this out- it's about Tapeworm of a rat....

http://iai.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/69/7/4417
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Thanks for asking.

Postby RANDY » Mon Apr 24, 2006 1:40 am

Mom is in denial and she is goig in tomorrow to have a wire atttached to her boob and have them makr it so they get teh right one. Then at *:30 AM the following day she goes in for the operation and if they find cancer in the lymph nodes we are in trouble but if not and they take what they konw is there and the lymph nodes are clean we are OK.

I am a nervous wreck. Mom is 80 and lives with me full time now.
She was a flight attendent adn then got her masters and also became an RN and basically did Pysch nursing at an outpatient clinic on Long Island.
She is a sneaker wearing, over critical pain in the butt but she is my mom and I love her.

They found it via a mamo. her yearly one. She has always been cystic but this time around it was the real deal. Her C-Reative protein was also very elevated for a long time befoere she decided to take PROVACHOL.

I asked them to test for non-caseating granuloms too and they said they would find them if they were there.

So I am keeping a positive outlook but I am also very worried.

Thanks for asking.

Randy
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Postby London » Mon Apr 24, 2006 6:18 am

Well, thanks for sharing Randy. You will be in my thoughts and prayers-

You actually already have been. I'm so glad she has someone like you to help her.

Know that we are thinking of you!!

Love,

London
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Postby London » Mon Apr 24, 2006 6:25 am

Differentiation in a Nematode Worm

Part of the success of molecular genetics was due to the use of extremely simple organisms which could be handled in large numbers: bacteria and bacterial viruses. The processes of genetic replication and transcription, of genetic recombination and mutagenesis, and the synthesis of enzymes could be studied there in their most elementary form, and, having once been discovered, their applicability to the higher forms of life could be tested afterwards. We should like to attack the problem of cellular development in a similar fashion, choosing the simplest possible differentiated organism and subjecting it to the analytical methods of microbial genetics.
Thus we want a multicellular organism which has a short life cycle, can be easily cultivated, and is small enough to be handled in large numbers, like a micro-organism. It should have relatively few cells, so that exhaustive studies of lineage and patterns can be made, and should be amenable to genetic analysis.

We think we have a good candidate in the form of a small nematode worm, Caenorhabditis briggsae, which has the following properties. It is a self-fertilizing hermaphrodite, and sexual propagation is therefore independent of population size. Males are also found (0.1%), which can fertilize the hermaphrodites, allowing stocks to be constructed by genetic crosses. Each worm lays up to 200 eggs which hatch in buffer in twelve hours, producing larvae 80 microns in length. These larvae grow to a length of 1 mm in three and a half days, and reach sexual maturity. However, there is no increase in cell number, only in cell mass. The number of nuclei becomes constant at a late stage in development, and divisions occur only in the germ line. Although the total number of cells is only about a thousand, the organism is differentiated and has an epidermis, intestine, excretory system, nerve and muscle cells. Reports in the literature describe the approximate number of cells as follows: 200 cells in the gut, 200 epidermal cells, 60 muscle cells, 200 nerve cells. The organism normally feeds on bacteria, but can also be grown in large quantities in liver extract broth. It has not yet been grown in a defined synthetic medium.

To start with we propose to identify every cell in the worm and trace lineages. We shall also investigate the constancy of development and study its control by looking for mutants.
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Postby Skytroll » Mon Apr 24, 2006 8:16 am

London,

Where are you citing the above information from?

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Postby J Jill » Mon Apr 24, 2006 10:03 am

http://elegans.swmed.edu/Sydney.html

above link is: Differentiation in a Nematode Worm

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