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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 9:50 pm

Yeah, did you read the Dr Fungus article:

http://www.doctorfungus.org/thefungi/fusarium.htm

(Might need to log-in and then click on the link again).

Interesting since Fusarium is filamentous.

- John
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Re: Not getting it still~take a hard look

Postby Sabrina » Sat Apr 15, 2006 9:58 pm

John Kern wrote:
Sabrina wrote:Here is the link to the website John, it is not just one page.

http://www.personalconsult.com/articles ... ptoms.html



My concern was more with Frank Strick, and the "Rearch Institute for Infectious Mental Illness", which seems to conprise of that one article, and Mr Strick's pager and email. Strick is a "Nutritional Researcher", I'd like to check that the whole thing was not just a scam to sell supplements first.

Sabrina wrote:Let’s take syphilis as an example. Do you know anything about the history of this illness? :roll:


It does not seem different from the history of several other illnesses. I'm not sure what you are getting at.

Now, none here have time or even wish to try to convince you of the legitimacy of this disease. I hope that you will stay and help us figure out some information and add your wealth of knowledge that you have shown. But please stop with the DOP already because this is clearly not my problem and I need real help.


Okay, I won't mention DOP again (unless in response to someone who mentions it first).

I think we are getting a bit off-topic. This is about the "fiber disease". A collection of symptoms, the most unusual of which is finding fibers in lesions. If I were looking into this, then I'd look at the fibers. Some kind of statistics need to be gathered, as the current evidence is mostly anacdotal.

- John


Dear John,

I do not see your point but only your confusion please try not to spread this on my thread.

Frank Strick is only used as a reference in a footnote from this article written by By Dr. James Howenstine, MD.

“Footnotes:
1. Strick, Frank Townsend Letter for Doctors &Patients April 2004 pg. 123-125
2. Yolken, Robert American Journal of Psychiatry December 2003”


Now if you are questioning the legitimacy of Dr. Howenstine’s work or the content of his article then this is quite a different issue and should be addressed as such.

This website is part of a practice and belongs to:

James L. Schaller, MD, MAR, PA, DABPN, DABFM

Clinical and Research Psychiatry and Medicine
Adult Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Services
Subspecialty Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Hormonal & Nutraceutical Consultation
Anti-Aging & Obesity Consultation


I personally would never question the ethics or services of any doctor without having any consultation with them or even researching anything about them or their practice. :shock: Would you want somebody to do that to you? I sure wouldn’t. This doctor seems to have tons of credentials. Can you tell me what all of those letters on the end of his name all mean? :)

John wrote:

“It does not seem different from the history of several other illnesses. I'm not sure what you are getting at.”


Sorry John but if you need to brush up on that, you may wish to start a new thread on this board. At Biology-online the people here are wonderful and always willing to help you find your answers when it comes to things we need to learn about. Most of them do not even have fibers either. What a resource and right at our finger tips!


Now this is a fantastic idea, John!!!!!


“Some kind of statistics need to be gathered, as the current evidence is mostly anacdotal.”

Now we are talking. We desperately need statistics! The data base Alex made up it is a wonderful resource. Man, did he put in the work!!!! We all should send him a big thank you e-mail and let him know how grateful we are to have this resource.

What we need now is some statistics from a new source to help us, one that would have more exposure to the public and thus more people accounted for and maybe even registered at this organization.

Any ideas where one could find this, John?
:wink:
Peace,
Sabrina
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Re: Not getting it still~take a hard look

Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:30 pm

Sabrina wrote:I do not see your point but only your confusion please try not to spread this on my thread.

Frank Strick is only used as a reference in a footnote from this article written by By Dr. James Howenstine, MD.


I'm not confused at all. The entire Howenstine article is just a simplified rewording of Strick's original article:

http://www.highbeam.com/library/docfree.asp?DOCID=1G1:114820690&ctrlInfo=Round19%3AMode19a%3ADocG%3AResult&ao=

Strick:
In considering an infectious etiology to any chronic or acute mental illness there are at least four categories to consider. First are those infections already recognized to induce psychiatric symptoms. These include Pneumonia, Urinary tract infection, Sepsis, Malaria, Legionaires disease, Syphillis, Chlamydia, Typhoid, Diptheria, HIV, Rheumatic fever and Herpes (Chuang). While the psychiatric sequelae to these infections are noncontroversial, even so, they are rarely screened for if the initial presentation is made to a mental health professional. Moreover, the significance of some of these infections may date back to prenatal development. Research done at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and published in the Archives of General Psychiatry in 2001 found that mothers with evidence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 infection at the time of pregnancy had children almost six times more likely to later develop Schizophrenia.


Dr. James Howenstine, MD
Four types of infectious problems are capable of producing mental symptoms. These are infections well recognized for causing psychiatric problems (pneumonia, urinary tract infections, sepsis, malaria, Legionaires Disease, syphilis, chlamydia, typhoid fever, diphtheria, HIV, rheumatic fever and herpes). Research done at Johns Hokins Children's Center and published in the Archives of General Psychiatry in 2001 disclosed that mothers with evidence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 infection during pregnancy were 6 times more likely to have a child who later developed schizophrenia than mothers without herpes infections.


It's Strick's qualifications and motivations I question. No letters after his name.

- John
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Postby yet again » Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:36 pm

Based on my reading, and resultant impressions - I just want to remind you all, you with Morgellons symptomatology - keep an eye on this site:

http://morgellonswatch.blogspot.com/

See particularly the work of April 15th.

(don't you have 'something.....?' to do with this site Mr. Kern?)

Such concern as yours, well, what can one say?

Yet Again.
Last edited by yet again on Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:33 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Not getting it still~take a hard look

Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:40 pm

Sabrina wrote:John wrote:

“It does not seem different from the history of several other illnesses. I'm not sure what you are getting at.”


Sorry John but if you need to brush up on that, you may wish to start a new thread on this board. At Biology-online the people here are wonderful and always willing to help you find your answers when it comes to things we need to learn about. Most of them do not even have fibers either. What a resource and right at our finger tips!



Well, there's no need to be sarcastic Sabrina. I'm well versed in the History of Medicine. You pointed me at the history of syphilis, but did not indicate what you meant this. I presume you are trying to say something along the lines that many medical conditions have had historically incorrect etiologies and treatments, and many were ascribed to, or equated to, madness - syphilis especially, as it tended to lead to dementia at the tertiary stage, if untreated. Biological agents new to science are discovered every year, hence there are probably still some unknown biological agents that cause both physical and psychological disorders.

Or did you mean something else?

- John
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Re: Not getting it still~take a hard look

Postby Sabrina » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:07 pm

John Kern wrote: I'm well versed in the History of Medicine. You pointed me at the history of syphilis, but did not indicate what you meant this. I presume you are trying to say something along the lines that many medical conditions have had historically incorrect etiologies and treatments, and many were ascribed to, or equated to, madness - syphilis especially, as it tended to lead to dementia at the tertiary stage, if untreated. Biological agents new to science are discovered every year, hence there are probably still some unknown biological agents that cause both physical and psychological disorders.

Or did you mean something else?

- John


No, that's great John.



Can you answer my other question?

You know the one about statistics?

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Re: Not getting it still~take a hard look

Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:16 pm

Sabrina wrote:Can you answer my other question?

You know the one about statistics?

Peace,
Sabrina


I don't really have any ideas beyond people in groups like this formulating some statistically meaningful standard for recording things like fiber length and frequency, so some solid correlations can be made. I'm surprise organizations like morgellons.org have not done anything like this.

It does not take much, just ten people who approach the observations in a rigerous manner would be enough for statistical significance.

- John
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Postby Linn » Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:11 am

I were looking into this, then I'd look at the fibers. Some kind of statistics need to be gathered, as the current evidence is mostly anacdotal.


:? ummm,
HELLO :)

Every one go ahead ignore what I am trying to do.
Like I said I will just go by previous posts and gather
data that way, Or better yet, :roll:
Ukguy,sky and helen,
Maybe set up program and just let people answer
our survey
Why should I bother?
There is no point to keep talking about it.
We are trying to DO something about it.
:evil:
And all the other people world wide who are studying
this too, we will see what kind of things we come up
with collectively.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby Linn » Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:26 am

London wrote:Remember when I brought this up way back when? I would'nt rule it out people.
____________________________


Fusarium oxysporum, also referred to as Agent Green is a fungus that causes Fusarium wilt disease in more than a hundred species of plants. It does so by colonizing the water-conducting vessels (xylem) of the plant. As a result of this blockage and breakdown of xylem, symptoms appear in plants such as leaf wilting, yellowing and eventually plant death.

Interest in Fusarium oxysporum as a pesticide was first raised after the discovery in the 1960s that it was the causative agent in the destruction of the Hawaiian coca population.
The United States government was involved in a controversial program to use Fusarium oxysporum for the eradication of coca in Colombia and other Andean countries, but these plans were cancelled by president Bill Clinton who was concerned that the unilateral use of a biological agent would be perceived by the rest of the world as biological warfare. The Andean nations have since banned its use throughout the region. Use of biological agents to kill crops is potentially illegal under the Biological Weapons Convention.


OMG
I mentioned about some of this for a presentation on pesticides.
I found some excellent info. If I can find that report? :)
Wherever I put it, hope I didnt chuck it.

There go's my crazy theory on origens again though.
South America>Mexico>California/Texas>Spread via travel?
big cities??? Cities with? and w/imports??

Crazy hah? :roll:
Last edited by Linn on Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby John Kern » Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:35 am

Fusarium oxysporum occurs naturally in crops all across the US. It would not need to travel from South America.

- John
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Postby Linn » Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:41 am

John Kern wrote:Fusarium oxysporum occurs naturally in crops all across the US. It would not need to travel from South America.

- John


your not getting it John :wink:

and your depression and withdrawal are


and...hmmm? did I say I was depressed or withrawn? :)
Last edited by Linn on Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby John Kern » Sun Apr 16, 2006 12:46 am

Linn wrote:
John Kern wrote:Fusarium oxysporum occurs naturally in crops all across the US. It would not need to travel from South America.

- John


your not getting it John :wink:


If you'r saying that this was some kind of "weaponized" fungus, then you are mistaken. It was only mentioned in the context of "biological warfare" because it is a biological agent - a living fungus, as opposed to most herbicides, which are chemicals like Agent Orange. It's the same Fusarium oxysporum you find in Texas. The mention of "biological warfare" is a legal definition, Clinton wanted to avoid being accused of breaking biological weapons treaties on a technicality.

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