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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby in_the_uk » Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:33 am

Thanks Lynne, quite obivously I still have to have contact with people and I am sure that if I tell my friends about my fibres then they will want to know if they are going to catch it.

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Postby in_the_uk » Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:44 am

My feather hypothesis.

I think that the feathers are the ruptured remains of a fibre carrying pod. The fibres are either compressed and elongate on release or extend over time. To prove or disprove my hypothesis requires several short bright white stiff fibres, a pressure chamber, a way of recording the process, a sum of money, a final year undergraduate student or a masters degree student and a lecturer who has a passing interest in the subject who needs a project for his/her student. Basically, if the stiff white fibre is placed under pressure in the pressure chamber and then the pressure is very suddenly removed then the fibre should explode and liberate its cargo and leave a feather like thing. If this was observed and recorded, and the reported upon, including a through literature review then I think that that would be quite useful. I don't know how much that would cost but that would be a little more snow to the snow ball.

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C-REATIVE PROTEIN

Postby RANDY » Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:59 am

C-REACTIVE PROTEIN TEST:
1.15 HIGEST RISK

There are many sites on the net that describe the risks of having this at highest risk. And everyone that has tested so far is in the high risk. A simple blood test taken at a docs office and sent to a lab can get you your results. If you take Provocal for it make sure to take CoQ10 to balance the depletion. It can save you from having a heart attack.

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Postby FiberSymptoms » Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:12 am

-------------------------------------
Last edited by FiberSymptoms on Sat Dec 02, 2006 10:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby London » Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:44 am

Dear Fiber Symptoms,

Oh yes, how right YOU are re: pesticides.

My gosh I should write a book, I have so much information that it is mind-boggling. People just do not realize.....they not only put pesticides
on the crops; they even put them in the foods we eat.

This range is so vast......Do people realize that they used algea in food products? If you'd like, I can post a link to a 1962 gov't document proving this. Just say when~

and oh, the goat milk, well I'm not sure what it is used for, but the gov't knows how dangerously contaminated it is!
*******************

Has anyone heard of what I'm now looking into? It is called
TOXIC OIL SYNDROM,
I began searching for this simply b/c

I noticed a slight oily appearing residue on the liquid waste
that my body would expel. Just now getting into researching this.
*******************

Dear Helen,

Here is something that you might find useful.......:) It is a document from the CDC and how they are supposed to transport these

organisms. I doubt the CDC would like me to print this, so I am!

http://www.cdc.gov/od/ohs/biosfty/shipr ... sportation

and this is really good! It is called:

Department of
Transportation
Research and Special Programs
Administration

Hazardous Materials: Revision to
Standards for Infectious Substances; Final
Rule
http://www.cdc.gov/od/ohs/pdffiles/DOTHazMat8-14-02.pdf
**********************

I know you say your was shipped and these articles are on interstate, but I suspect the same guidlines apply.


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Postby Doc44 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:47 am

Why would it be necessary to ship Morgellons samples using the CDC's guidelines for shipping hazardous or infectious materials? The CDC has said that all the Morgellons samples they have looked at are nothing but cloth fibers and lint. So I guess we can drop the fuzzballs, granules, fibers, and black specks in just a plain envelope and drop in the "out" slot at the post office.

Doc44

The postman delivers......ever wonder why the word "POSTAL" developed to mean "go crazy and shoot everybody"?
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Postby J Jill » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:18 am

http://www.mindfully.org/GE/Bioengineered-Bugs.htm

Bioengineered Bugs Stir Dreams Of Scientists; Will They Fly?
"When you dine with the devil, bring a long spoon."
Machiavelli
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Postby in_the_uk » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:28 am

Thanks London,

Section 72.3 "...... no person may knowingly transport or cause to be transported on interstate traffic .... any material knwon to contain...."

It would be interesting to trace the history of the crate and find out if it was infected on the plane or where the engine was packed or where the wood was sourced. Presumably, if it became infected on the plane then there is probably at least one other case going off in the uk somewhere. Ed has asked the guy who owns the engine to check with the man that he bought it from but he is not moving very fast. I don't think that he understands.

Doc 44: I can hear exactly what you are saying but I don't think that knowingly not taking precautions would help the situation. Ed and I used to have a joke about how when the whole of this town is infected and the psychiatric hospital is full then they would have ring fence this town and make it an annex to the the pyschiatric hospital - the medication trolley would follow the post person around in the morning.

Interestingly, and a rather tenuous link, bird flu arrived in the uk 8 days ago. They are currently testing to see if it is the lethal H5N1 strain. Once morgellons is recognised its gloabl migration can be minimised.

J Jill: that' really interesting. I think that the problem with the bug fixes is that in the race to market they are probably released in the beta version and the final development is in response to customer feedback. With a car, or software then the product can be recalled or patched. It seems to be a bit more precarious to release a beta bug.

Helen

UPDATE:

London, you know another way of drawing the attention of researchers and academics to this issue is by doing what I am going to do this afternoon. I am going to phone an academic of my choice and ask him how much it will cost for an undergardaute to test my feather hypothesis (see earlier post). He/ she will then be obliged to chat with me. I can then ask where I can apply for a grant to pay for it. He/ she may already have a pot of money that will pay for it.

If we each have a hypothesis that we want testing and manage to get it tested then that will start a body of research literature.

Response: Speak to a clinician and get it identified.
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Postby London » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:11 pm

Doc 44; oh hell, you gave me some more bad thoughts.....like I told the other person that told me that.....(just to stick 'em in an envelope)

I said " Oh, that's mean.....so I will do it!" and i will Doc!! maybe already have?????

Helen,

Good idea, do you know if this will work in the US too? I did'nt know if your Universities have a certain rule that our do not that might make your
Universities in london do this.

then the last sentence thru me off......what were you trying to tell me?

That that is what they will say to me? or that is what they have said to you?

Thanks,

London
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Postby London » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:23 pm

Wanted to share this with you guys:

Woolhouse MEJ, Gowtage-Sequeria S. Host range and emerging and reemerging pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis [serial on the Internet]. 2005 Dec (info)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol11no12/05-0997.htm

..."The survey of human pathogens produced a count of 1,407 human pathogen species, with 177 (13%) species regarded as emerging or reemerging (Appendix). Of all pathogen species, 208 are viruses or prions, including 77 (37%) regarded as emerging or reemerging. For bacteria, the counts were 538 and 54 (10%), respectively; for fungi, 317 and 22 (7%), respectively; for protozoa, 57 and 14 (25%), respectively; and for helminths, 287 and 10 (3%), respectively. These numbers differ slightly from those previously published (1,3) as a result of adjustments to taxonomies and the discovery of previously unknown pathogen species. Clear differences were found between the pathogen groups (χ24 = 154.3, p<<0.001), with viruses greatly overrepresented among emerging and reemerging pathogens and helminths underrepresented."..."More than 20 virus families contain human pathogens, with just 4, the Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Reoviridae, accounting for more than half of the species affecting humans and, likewise, more than half of the emerging and reemerging species. "..."Drivers of Emergence We identified 10 main categories of drivers of emergence and reemergence and ranked these by the total number of pathogen species associated with them (Table). The ranking of drivers across different categories of pathogen showed poor concordance (e.g., Spearman rank correlation for bacteria vs. viruses, rs = 0.41, n = 10, p = 0.24). The most striking discrepancies were as follows: 1) the marked association of emerging or reemerging fungi with hospitalization, poor population health, or both; 2) the greater importance of pathogen evolution and contaminated food and water and the lesser importance of international travel and changes in land use and agriculture for bacteria in comparison with viruses; 3) the greater importance of changing land use and agriculture for zoonoses than for nonzoonoses."..."Overall, most zoonotic pathogens are either not transmissible (directly or indirectly) between humans at all (i.e., humans are a dead-end host) or are only minimally transmissible. ..."Humans are affected by an impressive diversity of pathogens; 1,407 pathogenic species of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and helminths are currently recognized. Of this total, 177 (13%) pathogen species are considered emerging or reemerging. This number must be viewed with some caution, given that these terms are still used somewhat subjectively. More rigorous definitions of emerging and reemerging have been proposed (5,17,18), but these are difficult to apply universally because they require long-term data on distributions and incidences which are available for only a small subset of infectious diseases (e.g., malaria [19] and tuberculosis [20]). Moreover, the counts of emerging and reemerging pathogen species reported here are subject to ascertainment bias. Despite these caveats, our results suggest that pathogens associated with emerging and reemerging diseases share some common features.".."Even if a pathogen is capable of infecting and causing disease in humans, most zoonotic pathogens are not highly transmissible within human populations and do not cause major epidemics. The possible magnitude of an infectious disease outbreak is related to the basic reproduction number, R0 (Figure 3)."..

PS: How the Hell did that smiley face get up there....and I can't fix it?
Weird!
and.................................now this:

Nanobacteria is spread thru the clouds?????

http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/apr2005 ... -11-03.asp

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Postby canalon » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:44 pm

London wrote:
PS: How the Hell did that smiley face get up there....and I can't fix it?
Weird!

London


Your smiley came because the text came as 8) which is the code for the smiley in your text. And you can disable it by simply clicking on the "disable smilies in this post" button in your edit window.
Patrick

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any proof. (Ashley Montague)
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Postby Linn » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:55 pm

Doc44 wrote:Why would it be necessary to ship Morgellons samples using the CDC's guidelines for shipping hazardous or infectious materials? The CDC has said that all the Morgellons samples they have looked at are nothing but cloth fibers and lint. So I guess we can drop the fuzzballs, granules, fibers, and black specks in just a plain envelope and drop in the "out" slot at the post office.

Doc44

The postman delivers......ever wonder why the word "POSTAL" developed to mean "go crazy and shoot everybody"?


No doubt doc, this is most likely true for the most part. If one starts to look at their skin under magnification one will see many kinds of fibers that are present in great numbers from everything around us.
I believe some are looking for some visible cause of the symptoms and so think the fibers are the cause.

However, its when these fibers are UNDER the skin (like a sliver that needs to be pulled out) or when they are large amounts of the same size, shape and color fibers where there is lesions or where there is itching and no where else, and where these fibers are of colors that are not from anything in the surroundings that one will question the origin of them.

In addition, there were cases in the early 1970's (I remember it well) because my family had it, where fiberglass was being used to make curtains and other materials, and when washed in the machine these fibers collected in the tub and were caught in other laundry.
Whole families were going to the doctor with strange itching allergic breakouts.

Now that I am temporarily symptom free I plan to take a look at what "normal" clothing fibers I can find on my body and compare to what I find when I am active.

Something in the enviroment is causing these symptoms, something some people are highly allergic to.

For example, I can not wear some types of clothing at all, because I am very allergic.

What if for some people some new type of material is causing skin reactions?
What if this is nematodes and some people are reacting to that?

Take fleas for example, I know from experience that two people can be sitting on a sofa and one can be biten up by fleas, and the other totaly left alone. Why is that?

Maybe, yeast on the skin does attract insects as brought out by fibersymptoms, insecticides could damage the skins normal bacteria and Ph and cause candida overgrowth.

The important thing is that doctors need to take patients more seriously, I have heard that DOP is not THAT common, unless people are becoming more cookoo for some reason lately.
:? :? :? :?: :?
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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