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Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby ishsef » Sun Jan 01, 2012 2:10 pm

Every entity created by God on this planet has its own basic harmonic "signature." When a harmonic or a sound frequency is compatible with or similar to the signature of the individual, that individual experiences various mental and emotional responses generated by the the harmony (music) that results. Some music or harmonics are repugnant and therefore are avoided because of their unpleasantness. Our relationships are formed in a similar fashion. We like folks with like harmonics.
Simply put, when we experience harmony, it is pleasing to us as with any animal (i.e. "Music can calm the savage beast.")
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby xoxokayla » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:54 pm

I do the exact same thing. I have for years. I love the sound of people rummaging through their make up. I also love hearing certain voices. I thought I was the only one who did this. I too get sleepy when this happens. Its almost as if I'm hypotized. I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one.
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby andym777 » Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:53 pm

Hi guys

I too used get the same kind of feelings, but only when hearing a washing machine spin. I've actually recorded several different ones and, although they sounded different, they all had the same effect. Tingling shivers and, if I listened long enough, I'd feel really quite spaced out. But, as I say, used to get this feeling, it all changed a couple of years ago.

A couple of years back I was having a particularly stressful time of things. a couple of major problems came up and they really knocked me sideways. The stress and anxiety was really getting to me and so I sought help on the form of psychotherapy. The therapy worked wonders, and I'd recommend it to anyone in a similar situation.
However, one 'effect' of the therapy, which I really wasn't expecting was that the feelings associated with the sound of a spinning watching machine were gone. I still like the sound. (To be honest I'm listening to it now while typing this) but I never get the tremors/shivers anymore and I do miss them, as it was a nice feeling.

This may only be a coincidence or it may be that I'm now generally more relaxed and therefore the sound doesn't lessen stress, because I'm not stressed anymore?

Andy
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Postby andym777 » Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:07 pm

OK I'm going to add a little more to my previous post.

I am cheating a bit as I am a psychotherapist myself. The problems a couple of years ago were actually a form of 'burn out' that we psychotherapists run the risk of acquiring. (don't think acquiring is the right work but can't think of a better one right now)

The reason I mention this is because of the last few posts, particularly ones mentioning the feeling of like being hypnotized. I sometimes use hypnosis in my works as it helps us to access childhood memories and associated emotional states. When you say it's like being hypnotized it's because you are.

You're experiencing 'auto induced' hypnotic regression into a childhood memory of when you first heard, or experienced the sound, and the associated positive feelings during the experience.

Psychotherapists (or certainly this psychotherapist) will use this effect to access negative emotional states in order to work with them at the unconscious level, this bringing them into consciousness. Of course the opposite also happens and we access a positive state. a happy feeling. sound and audio stimuli are very effective at inducing this. we all had the experience of suddenly smiling at a piece of music that reminds us of a happy time. this is spontaneous hypnosis. It's likely that sound like the ones described are having this kind of effect.

Personally speaking, I still don't know why the spinning washing machine should have had this affect on me as I know my parents didn't have a washing machine when I was young. Nor do I know why it stop after therapy, but it certainly has...
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby Bexy » Tue Feb 21, 2012 6:31 pm

Hey! I'm so glad I found this forum. I'm glad I know I'm not the only person who this happens too :). Also, thank you so much for all the audio links!
I have been experiencing this sensation since I was very young. My favorite thing is the turning of pages/rustling paper; additionally, the sound of people whispering and certain keystrokes on a keyboard arouse the same feelings. Like everyone else who has posted, when I hear these noises I get a tingling sensation similar to the sensation from someone touching your hair. Also, it is difficult to move at all until the sound stops or I willingly break away from the sensation. On the down side, the sound of people chewing is revolting to me. Music doesn't effect me at all, and I don't play any instruments or sing well.
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby littlesounds » Thu Mar 08, 2012 11:31 pm

I find this subject fascinating. I think that I've always had a certain set of sounds that triggered this response from me. Mostly those are:

Little bips and bleeps from some minimalistic ambient music (especially over headphones)
Soft typing on some keyboards
Sound of hair being cut
'Crinkly' sounds if they are soft and slow and not harsh

I also have very good hearing and wonder if that has anything to do with this.
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby AmyGdala » Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:23 am

So glad to know it wasn't just me!!!!

This tingly, euphoric, pleasant, relaxing feeling has been happening since I was a child.

For me, it almost always occurs when someone is looking at say a supply catalog over my shoulder with me or on the phone with me helping me find a product.

I think everyone on here helped make the page-turning or paper sound connection.

It's almost as if I'm being put into a slight trance by this delightfully almost numbing or rather, tingly warm sensation in my head/brain. It's extremely relaxing. Like aural therapy and almost tactile. But (for me) always involves another person near me, and one is helping the other figure something out.

Have tried to replicate it voluntarily, but it doesn't seen to work that way.

My guess is it's also got to do with the tone or inflection of the other peoples' voice? Perhaps it's an odd form of bonding with someone in a non-sexual, non-parental way?

If they could bottle this feeling up, anxiety and insomnia would be a thing of the past.

With this message board, I hope a professional in the neurological sciences can read this, and post a name for this. Also, does everyone have this or just special people like the users of this forum? :)

It is a similar sensation to that of getting your hair washed and/or styled by someone.


Love it!
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby billex » Tue May 08, 2012 10:26 pm

I actually stayed late at work the other day because the cleaner started shuffling about in the cleaner cupboard sorting out supplies and bagging things up and piling things together and the sound was so soothing I sat at my desk for an extra 20 mins just listening to it..!
I even remember films which contains scenes with nice noises in them. And if I encounter someone with a 'nice' voice then I could listen to them for hours..I would pay good money for a complication of noises - but I guess everyone has a different idea of what is 'nice', but for me these noises are nearly always generated by someone being busy, industrious, quietly efficient - for me the sound is wrapped up in that type of activity - I am not sure even if the sound was 'nice' I would want to hear someone doing something that was in any way a 'negative' act as for me that would take away some of the pleasure - I am sure it all stems from being very young and hearing my mum pottering around me doing small chores..amyway - really pleased I am not the onlly one with this, my husband thinks I am mad!
x
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby alycat32 » Sat May 26, 2012 11:45 pm

Hi there! I registered just so that I could reply to this post. The closest I have come to those who enjoy certain sounds as much as me are the people who listen to "whisper" videos on youtube. In fact, youtube videos are how I get myself to fall asleep at night.

There are certain people on youtube who's voices are so soothing they literally put me to sleep. There is a woman on youtube named Albatross234 who is what i'd call a big conspiracy theorist about pretty much everything, and I really honestly have no interest in WHAT she is saying, it's her voice and the little clicks in her voice that sooth me. Also, there is another woman named ringaroundtharosey on youtube that I watch often because she smacks her lips a LOT when she is talking. Kind of a popping, smacking noise. Practicly constantly in some instances. I know that is weird to most people but for some reason those noises comfort me. She's even done a video or two of her eating and talking at the same time and instead of it grossing me out, it comforts me.

There is another woman named sushicatny on youtube that's accent and the way she talks during her grocery hauls soothes me as well.

Here are some things that comfort me, and I have to say that as far as soothing voices go, and people who smack when they talk, it got me in trouble in highschool, because in science class I would nod off because of the way the teacher talked. It was like I was hearing him but not hearing him because I was in that "trance" state. Same with my math teacher, and unfortunatly Math is my worst subject.


1:) Gum chewing..other people chewing gum, gum chewing in movies (like the scene in Pleasantville where Reese Witherspoon is on the phone with her friend and she's WORKIN that gum lol)

2:) Soothing voices

3:) People who smack or pop their lips when they talk, or people that lick their lips when they talk

4:) typing on a keyboard..when my best friend came to visit me one summer she stayed up a little later than me and was on the computer chatting to her sister on instant messenger and the sounds of the keys were like heaven, I hoped she'd stay up longer than she did haha


It's glad to know i'm not the only one. It's a nice thing, but at the same time I also think it can be a burden. Like I said, a lot of my teachers had soothing "sponge cake like" voices that caused me to zone out and not absorb what they were saying
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby imnotaloneanymore » Wed May 30, 2012 2:53 am

:lol: I have been laughing so hard reading all the posts on this topic for the simple reason that I never knew anyone else who reacted to sounds like I did. I was watching a Dr. Phil show and saw how people could be effected in a negative way to certain sounds that caused them to freak out, and then I told my wife that I had a similar thing, except with the oppsite reaction...she thought I was nuts in a funny way.
I get the same euphoric feeling with intense pleasure from listening to the same sounds everyone else is posting. Music does nothing for me though. Also, the sounds are not always what has to be just right to trigger the sensation, but the speed at which they are made. Too fast or slow will not trigger the response, but the sound will heighten my sense until the correct speed creating the right frequency is implemented.
I still remember the first day I ever experienced this (22 years ago) like it was yesterday. I was 8 years old in the fourth grade and the teacher asked us to turn in our books to a page when the kid (charles) next to me started turning his pages, I FROZE. I had no idea what I was feeling, but didn't want it to end. After that I used to mess up his place in the book just to make him turn back....he thought it was a funny game...i thought it was heaven.
People at work ask me how I can sleep so easily and deep at work on my lunchbreak, and I just smile as I would never tell them that the sound of people reading magazines and going through their lunch bags/paper sacks can put me to sleep in literally less than a minute.
It's so interesting how this works...and WIERD, but I find myself lucky to be so easily put into a state of immense joy with the help of youtube. Like a drug, I can shut off any stress of the world by just listening to things be manipulated by others. I was actually watching a guys videos on youtube when I thought to look this up. (soueu2002) In most of his videos he very meticulously inspects/reviews military equipment without talking and it almost always puts me to sleep. In the one video he talks in, the sound and speed of his speech is so relaxing, and the chills take over.
I too work at a grocery store and can relate to the comment someone left about the "chip guy" putting up his supply. I also love the sound of those 4 ft. brooms normally used in a gym and hearing the clank of the metal as it is being turned. I would love to see some detailed research done on this just to find out exactly what is gong on inside of the brain to cause this.
Thanks to everyone for sharing their stories about this and how it effects them as well!!!!!
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Postby emptyshadows » Fri Jun 22, 2012 9:52 pm

I thought I was the only defect lol...pencil cases and papers send me into a hypnotic state. potato chip bags and whispers wow what the hell causes this?
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Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby alycat32 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 6:04 am

The above talk about lunch break causes me to remember when I myself worked at a grocery store. I would often nod off in the breakroom myself if someone was reading a newspaper or if they were eating fruit salad (I know, weird right? I think it's the wetness in their voice when they speak as they are eating it) and trying to talk at the same time. I'd always have to snap myself out of it.

I used to watch Christopher Lowell, the house decorating guy on TLC or one of those types of networks. I'd often make the mistake of watching him before I went to work and his voice just put me to sleep and then i'd be groggy and have to wake myself up and get ready for work.

This is a little funny as well..there was an episode of Paula Dean's cooking show back in 2006 or so where she was cooking a Thanksgiving meal. She needed to go to the candy store to get candy for a dessert. She'd sample the candy as she was talking and talking with her mouthful somehow relaxed me so much that it would cause me to feel sleepy LOL

Also, if someone whispers in my ear it makes me tingle and twitch and I can't barely stand it lol


This isn't REALLY the same thing, but i've also slept with a fan since I was little. Not just to cool off but because I need the sound to put me to sleep. I think it stemmed from when I was a baby and the lulling noise of the furnace as it kicked on would put me to sleep. I have a very hard time sleeping when the power goes out.
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