Login

Join for Free!
118841 members


Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

Moderator: BioTeam

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby riamonger » Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:38 am

This has happened to me since I was young..i was thinking about this today and decided to google my conditon and found this site...
I have always wondered why this happens and now I know I'm not the only one..
I know it started when I was very young, but my earliest memory is when my dad would read the paper..The rustling of the paper would relax me...other sounds have done this, and not all paper rustling does this.....it has to be a certain sound..
at times it has been intense to the point where I get goose bumps and the hair on my arms would stick up...It"s a very calming sensation..Like a massage..only internal
I have read most of the comments here and all sound exactly like my experiences..
I hope to find out why this happens, but Im glad to know I'm not alone...
riamonger
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:19 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby riamonger » Fri Apr 08, 2011 5:41 am

I did another search and found a few videos on You Tube....Check under the name Leviticus45..He has several videos...
riamonger
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:19 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby RainMan » Mon May 02, 2011 4:04 am

Hilarious! We should start a support group! I get it too and have a sister who does also, but I have never met or known anyone else who does - they think you're mad. The sound of rain does it for me, rain and washing machines (when they're on of course). Waves of tingling through my head and spine to entire body, puts my hair on end. Sense of calm and peace etc., all the 'symptoms'. Once it gets going I can sort of control it... clench it (usually from the lower back), and send it rolling again down my arms and through my head. How weird is that?! Great fun.

I thought it was some kind of womb hangover because of the water sounds, and genetic because of my sister... though my parents don't admit to having it. Had it all my life (40+). I'm interested in knowing more about the phenomenon. Does anyone know if it has a name?
RainMan
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 3:49 am


Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby philipsteele » Sat Jun 18, 2011 7:04 am

Brain is the main controller of the nervous system. And it is situated in the head with the covering of skull and secure to the main sensory apparatus of vision, hearing, balance, taste, and smell...this is the main structure of our brain..
philipsteele
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2011 6:20 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby Jswarts21 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:46 pm

Oh this is soo amazing, of course I thought I was a weirdo bc of this reaction! Sucha a relief to know Im not the only weirdo! :lol:
I found this forum by googling " is it weird that the rustling of papers makes me sleepy?" lol Idk why the ruslting of papers or even when someone goes through a bag of makeup or pencils, it always makes me sleepy. AND OF COURSE I LOVE THE FEELING!
Idk if it has anything to do with my past or not, but eventhe sound of little kids ages 2-4 with their cute little voices puts me to sleep also.
Well if anyone ever figure out why this happens hit me up for sure!!!
Last edited by JackBean on Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: no need to shout on us
Jswarts21
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:39 pm

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby flashtrum » Sat Jul 09, 2011 4:17 am

Oh my God I thought I had some weird narcoleptic disorder. I have the exact same reaction to rustling papers. When I was in school and kids would be turning their pages of text books, I was in a trance and never wanted it to end. The other sound that did it for me then were kids rifling through pencil cases. The only other sound that comes close these days comes from kids bouncing a basketball outside.

What is this?
flashtrum
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 4:13 am

Postby flashtrum » Sat Jul 09, 2011 4:19 am

same thing for me with newspapers. and the only thing worth waiting in a doctor's office is if people are turning the pages of magazines.
flashtrum
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 4:13 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby RhombusPiano » Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:40 am

Hello,

I just had to register after finding this topic! I am a classically trained pianist (I do not have perfect pitch), and while that might make me more sensitive to certain sounds, it would seem from the other responses that ear training doesn't necessarily have any bearing on the phenomenon described in this thread.

I think it was Kim who described it as similar to having your head scratched? When I hear certain sounds, I experience a pleasant tingling sensation usually starting near the back of my head and radiating down my spine. Interestingly, music does not particularly elicit this response; if anything, it would be the sounds associated with music making (fingers sliding down the strings of violins/cellos/etc, piano hammers returning to place as you release the keys, the pleasant creak of wood, the timbre of certain voices).

Most often, I react to sounds similar to those others have discussed: the light crinkling of paper or plastic, gentle flow of water, that certain gravel or sediment in the voice (like Morgan Freeman or Ken Nordine), the sound of someone chewing, the laconic percussion of small objects, sometimes even the squelchy sounds made by mud. Perhaps the common factor in all of these things is that they are mostly delicate sounds. A raging river doesn't thrill my ears nearly so much as a ponderous stream (or an oar pulling through still water). It is as if these sounds "tickle" the ear... too much intensity and the nice tickle can become a scratch.

As with many people with this experience, I have found certain particular things that especially tickle my ears. I'm curious to know, has anyone else found these (or others) to really work to set the nerves a-tingling?
- from the film Amistad, the Bible scene and the dinner scene
- Ken Nordine, like in http://youtu.be/k88msPKWkKY
- I don't know if anyone else has found this site already, but http://www.soothetube.com/ seems to have a lot of "ear candy"
- Certain scenes in Good Night and Good Luck

Thanks, nice to know I'm not alone!
RhombusPiano
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2011 2:07 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby shihtzumom » Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:01 pm

I have a similar response to certain sounds that others on this thread have mentioned. One person mentioned that it feels like a "brain massage" and I concur; that is the closest description I can come up with. I get a similar, but not quite the same, sensation when someone brushes my hair. These sounds in particular lead to this response:

- Someone turning pages in a magazine or newspaper
- Another person eating an apple, pear, or peach
- Someone tending to houseplants (snipping dead growth, spritzing and watering)
- Someone gently using a pencil eraser (not so hard that it squeaks)
- My dog sniffing around my face or ears
- Certain scrap-booking activities, such as cutting, folding, or stamping

Like others, it seems key that it is someone else doing it and that the sound is random and not repetitive. People talking, coughing, or electronic noises like phones or computers seem to "break the spell" and wreck the sensation for me.

I did study music as a child and have always been an "auditory learner" - that is, I learn best when someone explains something to me out loud or there are instructions that I can read aloud to myself. I am one of those people who starts talking to themselves when doing a complicated task in order to keep track of my progress (I usually do this silently at work unless I am under a lot of stress.)

I mentioned this to my husband, who is an artist. He mentioned that maybe it's something to do with having an extra sensitive sense of hearing. He said when he looks at things he seems to see more colors than other people and tends to notice patterns that other people don't. He said maybe it's the same thing with my hearing, that I don't just hear rustling papers or plants but that I'm hearing something in the way people respond to the papers and plants or maybe there are extra little vibrations in the air that I'm picking up on, and that's why loud or distracting noises turn the sensation off. I was wondering if other people have a similar idea.

Also - I don't think I have a particularly sharp sense of hearing. In my job I wear a headset all day and I often have to crank the volume on it almost all the way in order to hear what's on the line. But I do think that maybe my hearing is sensitive the same way other people can taste extra flavors in things or smell certain odors better than others.
shihtzumom
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 12:37 pm

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby joem » Wed Aug 17, 2011 7:04 am

Not being involved in medical sphere, i'm convinced that reaction to noise is a matter of our anatomy, that enables us to go from a deep sleep to a quick sprint.The brain reacts to sound input because information signals are able to travel from the outside environment, across action potentials and through the neural network into the brain.
joem
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2011 6:55 am

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby chillsdownmyspine » Thu Aug 18, 2011 10:36 pm

Oh, how I love all you people! Finally, finally, finally, I have found information on this phenomenon. Even if there are no answers here, at least I have found others like me.

This has been happening to me since childhood also, and continues to this day (I am 55). I have never found another person who experiences it. They think they do, and come up with all kinds of comparisons, usually related to music, but it isn't the same - you just know it when you listen to their descriptions. With no disrespect to these posters meant at all, I believe that users "fastsandslash" and "MillieKittan"'s responses are the usual type that I have received when I have asked others about it. Yes, you have some reactions to certain sounds, but what most of us are talking about here is something completely different. As mentioned above, for me music is NEVER the thing that causes this sensation, and in fact would cause it to stop.

I'll start with this statement from above: "i get a loverly tingling sensation all over my head, just like when someon is playing with your hair...." - this is the way I might describe it to somebody so they can get a physical feeling for what it might be like.

My reaction has always started with a tingling sensation in the back of my skull and neck, then moving into my shoulders and the top of my head and top of my arms, then down the back of my spine. That's pretty much how far it goes, but if the stimulus continues, the tingling gets more intense all over. I have always called it "chills," but I do not see nor feel actual goosebumps, it is all internal, meaning there is no physical manifestation that can be seen.

At the same time as the tingling starts happening, my entire focus in the world shifts to that sound, and I go into a sort of state of suspension, my breathing becomes shallow and I don't dare move - if I move even slightly, that may be enough to stop the tingling.

I find the state I'm in to be what I would think a trance is like, well, I guess it IS a trance. As others said, I can prolong it and intensify it by will, but only if I remain pretty much non-moving. Then, when the stimulus is removed, I can also prolong it by playing back the sound over and over in my own head, until somehow I can't do that any longer, it just burns out or something. I have also thought that the sensation you get from codeine might be a tad similar, but then again, not really, yet you do feel somewhat "drugged." "Hypnotized" and "euphoric" that people mentioned above are other words I might use for it, but the tingling is the most important part of it.

The feeling is not in any way sexual, but I would call it sensual, and is the most pleasant sensation I have experienced in my life, with the exception of orgasm.

Mine is almost exclusively brought on by certain voices. ". . . that certain gravel or sediment in the voice (like Morgan Freeman or Ken Nordine)" - this rings a bell with me, it is the quality of the person's voice that affects me, not what is being said, for the most part. Mine, however, is almost always women's voices, not men. I used to work as a telephone operator, and every now and then a woman's voice on the other end of the line would put me into this trance state - I would do anything I could to keep them on the line! :) And as I recall, the voices would have a sort of "gravelly" quality to them. Unlike most others who posted here, I don't recall mine being triggered by rustling of papers or anything like that.

I also have odd times that it happens, and the only example I can think of now is when I was a child, a friend of mine and I sat together at a piano, and she told me she could play. I knew she couldn't play, and wondered why she was lying. So I opened a piece of sheet music, and told her to play. She then sat there and looked very carefully and seriously at the music, and began to play. She was very dramatic about it, and of course she couldn't play at all, but she was determined that I believe that she could play. The whole time she was doing it, at every pause in between notes, the tingling would start, and I know that it wasn't the music, it was something about the whole scenario. I know I have had similar experiences, with it being about actions by other people, just don't recall them now. ". . . watching and listening to a crafts person performing their art. Crafts like carving, pottery making, sewing or painting . . . " - some things like this, for some reason I think watching "The New Yankee Workshop" with Norm Abrams used to do it to me.

Luckily for me, I did find one person who causes the tingling to happen, and it is quite funny, actually. Anybody remember Miss Cleo, the television psychic? She used to have infomercials late at night, and her voice always got my tingling going. Stupid me, I never recorded her, but I did buy some tarot cards that came with a VHS of her, and can play it anytime I want. Also, lots of people have posted short clips of her on YouTube, so whenever I want I can go and zone out. :) In fact, that's where I just was when I came a'Googling for the umpteenth time to see if I could find an explanation for this phenomenon.

Here is one of my favorite clips of Miss Cleo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3FI0pDQOW4 When she days "it takes honing, it takes gleaning" I go tranced out all over. :mrgreen:

I also, luckily, found a free relaxation audio that also puts me into the tingle/trance state, by Bonnie Lambourn. I'm not sure if it is her voice, or her manner of speaking, or her difficulty with the pronunciation of certain words (she has difficulty with the word "abdomen") - well, actually, I think it is all three of those things. I transferred her to my mp3 player, and listen to her almost every night. If I am not really sleepy, I go into the tingle/trance state, if I am really tired, I go right to sleep. Here is her audio, it is the second one listed called "Combination Relaxation Exercise": http://www.hws.edu/studentlife/counseling_relax.aspx

I did listen to the examples that were posted in links by others, and none of them had any effect on me. I think our "cues" are probably specific to ourselves - I doubt most of you will get chills from Miss Cleo. :mrgreen:

The only thing I have ever found that I thought was connected was something having to do with the limbic system. From About.com: "The limbic system is a set of evolutionarily primitive brain structures located on top of the brainstem and buried under the cortex. Limbic system structures are involved in many of our emotions and motivations, particularly those that are related to survival. Such emotions include fear, anger, and emotions related to sexual behavior. The limbic system is also involved in feelings of pleasure that are related to our survival, such as those experienced from eating and sex." However, I have never found anything connecting this phenomenon to anything written about the limbic system, I just think that it may be the key to discovering what causes it.

Lastly, I almost don't want to find out what causes it, because I am afraid if I know, it might stop! And I don't ever want to lose it! Finding out there are other people like me may be enough. :D

Huge thanks to everybody who posted here, especially "Mem" who started the thread, I am glad you kept at it.

Now I'm off to listen to some more Miss Cleo - wish I could find her and get her to made a relaxation tape for me. :)
chillsdownmyspine
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 9:28 pm

Re: Sound and how the brain reacts to it

Postby chillsdownmyspine » Thu Aug 18, 2011 11:47 pm

riamonger wrote:I did another search and found a few videos on You Tube....Check under the name Leviticus45..He has several videos...


I just wanted to bring this back to the attention of the paper rustling fans - thanks riamonger. Leviticus45 has created TONS of sound effects audio. All of them are long (average 15 to 30 minutes) so you have plenty of time to enjoy. Right now I am listening to "Sound of Sorting Mail" - after listening to "Sound of Newspaper Turning Pages" - I think he has audio for every sound you guys mentioned - and he has 2,572 subscribers! Here is the link to his channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Leviticus45#p/u/0/G32JaQqBlIE

Enjoy. :)
chillsdownmyspine
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 9:28 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Human Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest