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UCP, Glycolysis, and the Krebs Cycle

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UCP, Glycolysis, and the Krebs Cycle

Postby cottonmaker » Tue May 11, 2010 10:52 pm

Hi Guys,

So while I was trying to writing a paper, I stumbled into a question that I simply could not figure out. My internet searches yielded no results, nor did my Bio-Major friends. I was hoping one of you guys could help me figure this out. It goes like this:

What is meant by “uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation”? What would happen to the rate of glycolysis and the Kreb’s Cycle if uncoupling compounds were found in the mitochondria? Why?


Thanks a bunch!
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Postby plasmodesmata11 » Wed May 12, 2010 2:52 am

as in uncoupling the electron transport chain? This is used to create excess heat. Instead of making more ATP, the excess energy generates heat. Skunk cabbages use this to melt snow around them to take a place in their niche. Look it up if that's what you meant... if not, sorry :P
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Re: UCP, Glycolysis, and the Krebs Cycle

Postby cottonmaker » Wed May 12, 2010 2:58 am

plasmodesmata11: Thanks for the reply.

Let me clarify.. The question begins like this:
"2,4 – Dinitrophenol is a compound that can be used to uncouple the process of oxidative phosphorylation by shuttling protons across biological membranes. There are other compounds, uncoupling proteins (UCPs) that can do the same.

What is meant by “uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation”? What would happen to the rate of glycolysis and the Kreb’s Cycle if uncoupling compounds were found in the mitochondria? Why?"

So, I'm not sure the question pertains to the electron transport chain..
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Postby plasmodesmata11 » Wed May 12, 2010 3:57 am

okay... so the UCPs disrupt the proton gradient. This means less ATP is made because they now flow freely (but in equilibrium) between the two spaces. I would GUESS that glycolysis and krebs would need to increase to make up for the energy deficit. this however, is only a guess. but it makes sense, right?
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Postby JackBean » Wed May 12, 2010 1:40 pm

yeah, uncouplers cause deplenishment of proton gradient, so glycolysis and Kreb's cycle should probably speed up...
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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