Login

Join for Free!
119274 members


Genetic Transmission

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

Moderator: BioTeam

Postby JackBean » Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:54 pm

The ribosomes are in all organisms. Well, except viruses, but these divide only in cells, which contain ribosomes anyway... Without ribosomes you don't have translation and without translation you have nothing ;)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
User avatar
JackBean
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5692
Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:12 pm

Re: Genetic Transmission

Postby Bembanadian » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:51 pm

Hey.

The ribosomes are in all organisms. Well, except viruses, but these divide only in cells, which contain ribosomes anyway... Without ribosomes you don't have translation and without translation you have nothing ;)


So do viruses hijack the ribosomes of infected cells for translation?

Peace and Love and Empathy,

Matt
Bembanadian
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 3:25 am

Postby kolean » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:53 pm

Yes, the viruses do hijack many of the cell's processes, and the ribosome is one of them.
kolean
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:15 am


Re: Genetic Transmission

Postby kolean » Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:38 pm

Bembanadian wrote:I'm thinking universally now. Here's an idea. Please tear it apart. All organisms will create a 'new' cell (I guess a daughter cell of some type) that will contain a copy of genetic information (either a full copy or half of the DNA). In sexually reproducing organisms two cells have to come together to share information. In asexual ones, the daughter cell can do it's own thing. With viruses, the virus transports the information into an existing cell. And with cloning, DNA is inserted into an existing cell after the initial genetic information is removed. In all cases, an actual MOLECULE is transported physically into the new cell. Is that right? Once in the new cell, the ribosomes read the information and... do their thing. They make new organisms. Whether they're viruses, single cell organisms or multi-cellular organisms. Is that right?


This is correct universally. . I guess. I have a problem of you saying "They make new organisms". A virus is just RNA and/or DNA, that enters the cell, takes over the cell's machinery, makes more of itself till the cell usually bursts with viruses, or the clever viruses have learned how to live in the cell and by surrounding its DNA/RNA with the cell's membrane as a 'shield' as it leaves the cell by pinching off (exocytosis). I guess you could call that a new organism....???

Ribosomes are not that important if you are trying to stay universal in your thinking.

Check out Google's Transcription first,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcription_(genetics)
and then Google's Translation (which is the second process of expression, and the ribosomes are just a support protein that places the molecules in such a way that connects the sequential amino acids into its specific protein product * )
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Translation_(genetics)

Then you can see all the different components of the expression machinery, and they all support one another in the process. The DNA is the molecule you are thinking of that is physically transferred from place to another (even here I can agree that is what viruses do, and they do it well). And after reading the Google Wikis, you may agree with me that it is the DNA polymerase which is more important than the ribosomes, as they are the ones that actually 'reads' the DNA, in the spot that is a gene (with the help of transcription factors), and produces the mRNA (or other RNAs).

*Genes that most people can comprehend are the protein-encoding ones. There is also genes that do not code for a protein, but the RNA that is transcribed from the DNA gene, is usually an RNA that has regulatory functions).
kolean
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:15 am

Postby Orome » Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:56 am

Hey Bembanadian,
very interesting ideas, it`s probably not a bad thing that you are no geneticist, so you are less biased...
At the moment i don`t have enough time to go more into detail but if this could be interesting for you:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weismann_barrier
(if you don`t know it already...)
The link also contains some other interesting key words (gene pool, baldwin effect).
From my point of view this (completely different topic..) is also very exciting:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immortal_strand_hypothesis
but requires some background knowledge.
The link also contains some other interesting key words (gene pool, baldwin effect).

Greets
Orome
Orome
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 8:04 am

Re: Genetic Transmission

Postby Bembanadian » Fri Apr 23, 2010 3:49 pm

Thank you all so much!

I really appreciate all of your answers. You have clarified this entire process for me and have allowed me to move forward with my work.

I've done some subsequent looking and discovered that I'm pretty much re-inventing the wheel here. There are already the fields of biocommunication and biosemiotics that look at semiochemicals. I had a "well no ****" moment when I realised that pheromones are a perfect example of a molecule that is used to transmit information. DNA is no different. It's a semiochemical that is used to transmit a message from one cell to another. Brilliant.

Now I can say this about genetic transmission with confidence.

1 - There is genetic information.
2 - The genetic information is ENCODED in a DNA molecule.
3 - The DNA molecule is copied and the copy of the DNA molecule is TRANSMITTED from a parent cell to a daughter cell (during either mitosis, meiosis or binary fission) or from one cell to a different cell via fertilisation, infection or Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.
4 - The transmission channel depends on which form of transmission is being used. In all cases, a DNA molecule is PHYSICALLY TRANSPORTED to a RECEIVER CELL.
5 - The message is received by a RECEIVER CELL.
6 - The message is decoded by EXPRESSION MACHINERY.
7 - All steps are affected by the presence of noise.

This has all been really fantastic. This goes a long way to support my hypothesis about the nature of replicators.

Peace and Love and Empathy,

Matt
Bembanadian
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 3:25 am

Previous

Return to Genetics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests