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Muscle Tension

For discussing the functions of different structures of all organisms.

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Muscle Tension

Postby purplec16 » Tue Mar 23, 2010 2:27 am

Which type of contraction develops more muscle tension: isometric or isotonic?
I think its isometric because isotonic is a constant rise of contraction, but then again, it can be isometric because at points it rises...I'm confused
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Postby david23 » Tue Mar 23, 2010 4:13 am

Wow shouldnt this be in the physiology section. Ok here is the thing. Tell me the definition that you are familiar with and perhaps look at the graphs of the two. The answer should be pretty clear. And dont say you are confused, you are definitely on the right track
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Re: Muscle Tension

Postby Kristenmickel » Fri Apr 30, 2010 7:51 am

This is really helpful article for everyone to understand . Here you have explained very nicely. I am proud of you because calling attention to a very important issue. It is very informative.
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Re: Muscle Tension

Postby Nataly56 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 10:49 am

Sorry I have to pass te test in biology, but I don't know anything, it's not my sprcialization actually
Could you please help me:
Which of the following is an example of an isotonic contraction? ?
1.Pressing one hand against a wall

2.A specialized machine that works the muscle through the full range of motion

3.Bicep Curl

4.none of the above
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Postby Planky » Tue Aug 23, 2011 12:26 pm

Isotonic contractions involve the muscle in a situation where equal amount of tension is being developed in the muscle throughout the exercise. The muscle develops equal tension while the muscle length changes. Such examples are pull-ups, push-ups and lighting weights.
Isotonic exercises are especially beneficial for developing strength and cardiovascular endurance. However, the major disadvantage is that the efficiency of joints varies with joint angles and thus, unlike the isokinetic contractions, a fixed resistance may not provide a sufficient workload over the complete range of motion to provide the maximum training benefits.
Isometric contraction is usually done when the joint or position of the limb is held in a fixed angular position. The muscle develops tension but there is no change in the length of the muscle. Isometric contractions occur when a rugby front row forward pushes against opponents in a static scrum, when American footballers perform a block tackle, or when a weight-lifter holds a barbell above his head for a few seconds. Exercises involving isometric contractions are especially good for developing strength, but it is not good for developing cardiovascular fitness.
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Re:

Postby bradly » Sat Nov 05, 2011 3:57 pm

Planky wrote:Isotonic contractions involve the muscle in a situation where equal amount of tension is being developed in the muscle throughout the exercise. The muscle develops equal tension while the muscle length changes. Such examples are pull-ups, push-ups and lighting weights.
Isotonic exercises are especially beneficial for developing strength and cardiovascular endurance. However, the major disadvantage is that the efficiency of joints varies with joint angles and thus, unlike the isokinetic contractions, a fixed resistance may not provide a sufficient workload over the complete range of motion to provide the maximum training benefits.
Isometric contraction is usually done when the joint or position of the limb is held in a fixed angular position. The muscle develops tension but there is no change in the length of the muscle. Isometric contractions occur when a rugby front row forward pushes against opponents in a static scrum, when American footballers perform a block tackle, or when a weight-lifter holds a barbell above his head for a few seconds. Exercises involving isometric contractions are especially good for developing strength, but it is not good for developing cardiovascular fitness.


Wow! Very thoroughly explained. Thank you very much! I personally do a lot of body weight exercises.
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Postby aptitude » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:03 am

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Re:

Postby dorapatton1 » Fri Nov 11, 2011 3:05 am

Planky wrote:Isotonic contractions involve the muscle in a situation where equal amount of tension is being developed in the muscle throughout the exercise. The muscle develops equal tension while the muscle length changes. Such examples are pull-ups, push-ups and lighting weights.
Isotonic exercises are especially beneficial for developing strength and cardiovascular endurance. However, the major disadvantage is that the efficiency of joints varies with joint angles and thus, unlike the isokinetic contractions, a fixed resistance may not provide a sufficient workload over the complete range of motion to provide the maximum training benefits.
Isometric contraction is usually done when the joint or position of the limb is held in a fixed angular position. The muscle develops tension but there is no change in the length of the muscle. Isometric contractions occur when a rugby front row forward pushes against opponents in a static scrum, when American footballers perform a block tackle, or when a weight-lifter holds a barbell above his head for a few seconds. Exercises involving isometric contractions are especially good for developing strength, but it is not good for developing cardiovascular fitness.

+1 Point to Planky LOL
Thank you for explaining this in terms the rest of us can understand!
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Re:

Postby daniel.kurz » Mon Nov 14, 2011 4:15 am



Images say a thousand words.
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Re: Muscle Tension

Postby DocWillow » Thu Nov 24, 2011 11:53 am

It should be isometric.

Isotonic muscle contraction remain constant provided that the weight of the object you lift remains the same.

While isometric contraction is characterize as contractions base on the sheer force and weight of different objects that was exerted with force.

Hope I helped.
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