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plantae protist and diatoms evolution

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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How are plantae protists and stramenopila (diatom) different

Postby yahman » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:26 pm

How are plantae protists and stramenopila (diatom) different and similar?

The attempt at a solution:

Diatoms: are a major group of eukaryotic algae (single celled algae), and are one of the most common types of phytoplankton. Most diatoms are unicellular and some are colonial algae, live in water, both heterotroph and autotroph, yellow brown chloroplast, they are sessile (don't have flagella however move by water stream as they float), reproduce by cell division. they are not considered to be plants because they are unicellular.

similarity: both are producers (bottom of food chain), photosynthetic

difference: plants are multicellular, diatoms are unicellular, plants reproduce by meiosis where as diatoms by cell division, most plants live on land where as diatoms strictly live in wet environment. plants are more complex and larger whereas diatoms are smaller (microscopic), there are out layer differences: plants have cell wall made of cellulose where as diatoms have cell wall made of silica, plants don't form colonies where as diatoms can form colonies, also there is chlorophyll (pigment) differences: plants usually have green chlorophyll whereas diatoms have yellow and brown pigments, some diatoms are capable of movement where as plants can move, and some diatoms are heterotrophic where as plants are strictly autotrophic. diatoms have different life cycles (alteration of generation), diatoms reproduce asexually by mitosis. diatoms fossilize when they die as rocks at the bottom of water, plants normally get eaten by decomposers. diatoms are more closely related to bacteria where as plants are more closely related to Eukaryote

source: textbook: biological science by scott freeman
* this is the best I could do as an attempt to answer the question, any feed back and correction is appreciated ! *
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plantae protist and diatoms evolution

Postby yahman » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:30 pm

plantae protist and diatoms evolution

Do similarities between plantae protist and diatoms arise from convergent or divergent evolution?



The attempt at a solution:

Ithey are from convergent evolution, I know they are paraphyltic on the evolution tree of life. It could be that environmental conditions could have caused this change thus it's convergent, they don't have shared derived trait with a common ancestor, and these new traits that have acquired are mere adaptations to environmental conditions.
source: biological science by scott freeman
(this is my best attempt, any help is appreciated !)
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How are plantae protists similar and different from plant ce

Postby yahman » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm

How are plantae protists similar and different from plant cells?


The attempt at a solution:

similarity: both are photosynthetic, and producers, both are paraphylitic

differences: protists are unicellular whereas plants are multicellular, plants are big and complex where as protists are microscopic, more diverse and abundant. some protists could move, plants can't move. there are differences in chlorophyll and cell wall composition, also some protists don't have cell wall. I assume that there are reproductive differences (not very certain what it might be, I only know that they have a life cycle called alteration of generation that maybe slightly different from plants). some protists could be heterotrophic where plants can't be.

source: biological science by scott freeman
* any feedback is appreciated, thanks*
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Postby mkwaje » Fri Jan 29, 2010 9:48 pm

What is your question? You asked the question and then attempted to answer it using Freeman's Biological Science. I assume this is a question posed by your teacher and you are looking for opinions that you are on the right track. Well, you can't argue with a book, and you would better discuss your posts with your teacher.

In my opinion though, you can try using other books. We don't use protist classification anymore, protozoa is a more accepted term.Stramenopila is also not just diatoms (unicellular),it is a big group that includes brown algae (multicellular). A simple check with google can be enlightening.

"...some diatoms are capable of movement where as plants can move, and some diatoms are heterotrophic where as plants are strictly autotrophic. diatoms have different life cycles (alteration of generation), diatoms reproduce asexually by mitosis. diatoms fossilize when they die as rocks at the bottom of water, plants normally get eaten by decomposers. diatoms are more closely related to bacteria where as plants are more closely related to Eukaryote..." <--- where did you get this? Because I'm pretty sure its not on the book, or else the book contains a lot of crap.

There is alternation of generation in some plants like the bryophytes (e.g moss). Plants can also reproduce asexually by mitosis. Plants can also get fossilized. A bunch of them are in museums. Plants normally get eaten by decomposers? I hope you don't tell that to your teacher. All of us are decomposed, every life form, most especially the diatoms. They don't die as rocks on the bottom of the ocean. Just like us when diatoms die, they leave a skeleton behind.

And finally, diatoms do NOT more closely resemble bacteria and that plants are more related to Eukaryotes. You are getting your classification mixed up. Plants are not related to Eukaryotes. Plants ARE Eukaryotes, and so are your Stramenopila. Bacteria are entirely on a different domain.

I do applaud on your post and questions meaning that you are willing to learn. Don't let my comments put you off, it simply means that there's still a lot to learn. You attempted to answer the questions and I think they were honest works based on your readings. I like the students better when they do this on their own and discover the answers for themselves rather than spoonfeeding them all in the classroom. At least you learn how to think - and that's the first step to real education.

Good luck and may you become a bright biologist someday :)
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