Login

Join for Free!
117504 members


Why do different batch of reagents produce different results

Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

Moderator: BioTeam

Why do different batch of reagents produce different results

Postby raychaw » Fri Dec 18, 2009 7:22 am

Using different batch of reagents, the results obtain from the 2 experiments differ. Why so?
raychaw
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:06 am

Postby biohazard » Fri Dec 18, 2009 8:24 am

The guys making your reagents haven't quite got their methods standradized properly?

Well, along that, for e.g. human/calf/etc serum preparations or other biological reagents you never really know what all the serum etc. actually contains, since every individual is different. So they make one batch where they mix sera of different individuals and all units of that batch are similar. But then they make a new batch and they've obtained it from different individuals or same ones in different condition, so there is bound to be differences -> the batch is not the same and your experimental conditions vary because of that.

Chemical reactions are usually much easier to standardize, but even these can give a bit different outocomes if you add a couple of milligrams more of Reagent X to the batch 2 than you did with the batch 1.

The more variables the preparation of some reagent has, or the source of the reagent has, the more difficult it is to get exactly similar product each time. The unitis wihtin a batch are usually pretty much identical, because they have been manufactured the same time from same reagents in same conditions and just divided to smaller units. But then you do the whole process again and something may change.
User avatar
biohazard
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2007 6:45 pm

Postby raychaw » Tue Dec 22, 2009 3:40 am

The methods are already standardize. However, it seems that every time we carry out an experiment, the fluorescence readings that we obtain seems to deviate around a few hundreds to a thousand. Although this difference is unanimous throughout all that particular experiment, it really makes us wonder why would there be such variation
raychaw
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:06 am


Postby mith » Tue Dec 22, 2009 7:36 pm

Noise probably? Are the results statistically significant? What's the supposed accuracy of the method?
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby raychaw » Wed Dec 23, 2009 9:08 am

Fluorescence? Noise? Link? Anyways it is statistically significant for some cases. The deviation is rather great
raychaw
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:06 am


Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests

cron