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Trehalose in Human Cells

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Trehalose in Human Cells

Postby zdearinger » Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:27 am

Trehalose is found in nearly every organism living in extreme cold environments and is found in human organs such as the kidney, liver, and blood plasma (organs that can withstand extended freezing times). Does anyone have any ideas as to how one could go about coating a human cell in trehalose?
Thanks
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Postby JackBean » Sat Dec 12, 2009 9:30 am

prepare a little of trehalose, pick a human cell and put it into the trehalose, shake a little and it will be coated ;) Maybe will you need to wash it with egg first :lol:
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Re:

Postby g0ld3n88 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 2:35 am

JackBean wrote:prepare a little of trehalose, pick a human cell and put it into the trehalose, shake a little and it will be coated ;) Maybe will you need to wash it with egg first :lol:


I don't want to be attacked by you again so i won't comment on your answer. I hope we can develop some sort of unity or neutrality. It's up to you whether you want to accept the offer or not. I just don't like it when people attack or make false generalizations about me, especially when i am just trying to help someone out.


Ok to the point:
Trehalose in human cells would be good because you can make them more versatile and possibly live longer.


I think what happens is you would get normal red blood cells, and dehydrate them by freeze-drying. Something like that. Then after you would incubate them in trehalose at 37 degrees Celsius for 7 hours or so because that would be the normal temperature of your body. How dilute or concentrated the trehalose solution is, is up to you.
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Postby JackBean » Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:16 am

Stupid question asks for stupid answers ;)

BTW I don't get much your respond, could you further explain, please?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Re:

Postby g0ld3n88 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 7:27 am

JackBean wrote:Stupid question asks for stupid answers ;)

BTW I don't get much your respond, could you further explain, please?


Which are you referring to the response to the question or to you?
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Re: Re:

Postby JackBean » Sun Dec 13, 2009 9:18 am

g0ld3n88 wrote:Trehalose in human cells would be good because you can make them more versatile and possibly live longer.


I think what happens is you would get normal red blood cells, and dehydrate them by freeze-drying. Something like that. Then after you would incubate them in trehalose at 37 degrees Celsius for 7 hours or so because that would be the normal temperature of your body. How dilute or concentrated the trehalose solution is, is up to you.

I don't get this.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby mith » Sun Dec 13, 2009 6:55 pm

trehalose is present doesn't mean it's serving the same function in a human as in a plant.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
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