Login

Join for Free!
118859 members


Type of Fertilization

Plants!

Moderator: BioTeam

Type of Fertilization

Postby nigel123 » Sat Jul 16, 2005 2:00 pm

1. Which type of fertilization (self fertilization or cross fertilization) will improve genetic variability of plants? Give reasons.

2. Why do most flowering plants tend to overproduce seeds?
nigel123
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2005 5:25 am

Postby Dr.Stein » Sat Jul 16, 2005 2:18 pm

1. Cross fertilization. In cross fertilization there will be genes recombination from other resources (other plants), so it will result in increasing diversity of their offspring.

2. To have more possibilities of their offspring to survive and continue their exixtence.
Image
User avatar
Dr.Stein
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 3501
Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2005 7:58 am
Location: 55284 Yogyakarta, Indonesia

reply

Postby mothorc » Sun Jul 17, 2005 12:24 pm

with some species, structure of flower make them have to self fertilization. Thus genetical variation not improve but these species still develope normally, I don't know why.example: ficus spp (flowers inside fruit)
User avatar
mothorc
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 138
Joined: Sat May 21, 2005 2:27 pm
Location: Farfaraway country


Postby Poison » Sun Jul 17, 2005 7:24 pm

Those kind of plants (the ones that adapted themselves for self-fertilization) usually are the ones which lost their pollen carriers (maybe like a kind of insect) in some step of their evolution.
The other reason might be that there is no need for a genetic variation. I mean, the plant can already survive with its present genetic material.
It matters not how strait the gate
How charged with punishment the scroll
I am the Master of my fate
I am the Captain of my soul.
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby MrMistery » Sun Jul 17, 2005 7:54 pm

That is inaccurate. There is always need for genetic variation, if it is possible. An organism is never fully adapted to the environment
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

reply

Postby mothorc » Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:12 am

But I think he is right
some plant don't have genetical variety, such as mangoteen. All mangoteen trees around the world have the same genetic matterial, because they derive from soma embryal (true embryal dead)
User avatar
mothorc
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 138
Joined: Sat May 21, 2005 2:27 pm
Location: Farfaraway country

Postby Poison » Mon Jul 18, 2005 4:17 pm

MrMistery wrote:That is inaccurate. There is always need for genetic variation, if it is possible. An organism is never fully adapted to the environment


That's what is written in my plant bio book. Do you have another idea about that?
It matters not how strait the gate
How charged with punishment the scroll
I am the Master of my fate
I am the Captain of my soul.
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby MrMistery » Mon Jul 18, 2005 7:26 pm

Of course there are a lot of self-fertilising plants on this earth: peas, vines etc... The dracil plant even has a mechanism that releases polen when it vibrates. But to say that an organism is fully adapted to the environment? That is an absolute statement. The guy who wrote that plant book of your might have known a lot of biology, but he didn't understand it.
Anyway, just think of this. Even if the plant is self-fertilising, that does not mean that there is no genetic variation going on: mutation, genic flow etc
It's just different strategies angiosperms have chosen: cross-polination or self-fertilising. It is true that one is more succesful than the other
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

reply

Postby mothorc » Tue Jul 19, 2005 3:34 am

to poison: Can you give me the name of your plant book?.thank you.
it is right that we can't say self-fertilize species have not genetical variation. but these species seem very stable.
User avatar
mothorc
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 138
Joined: Sat May 21, 2005 2:27 pm
Location: Farfaraway country

Postby Poison » Tue Jul 19, 2005 5:20 pm

I don't remember the name now. I will try to find it for you. Actually the name is Plant Biology. But I don't remember the authors.

I didn't say 'fully adapted'. I said 'it can survive'.
Even if the plant is self-fertilising, that does not mean that there is no genetic variation going on: mutation, genic flow etc

That's what I tried to say actulally. I think I have misunderstood. I didn't mean there is no variation. But there is no variation caused by fertilization.
It matters not how strait the gate
How charged with punishment the scroll
I am the Master of my fate
I am the Captain of my soul.
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey


Return to Botany Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest