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vertebrates!!!

Postby eso159 » Sat Jul 16, 2005 12:33 pm

what difference in blood structurally does vertebrates and invertebrates have can you help me? :roll:
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Postby Dr.Stein » Sat Jul 16, 2005 1:31 pm

One difference is their blood pigment. Vertebrates' blood pigment is haemoglobin (red color), whereas invertebrates (which have bloods) possess haemocyanin (blue-green in color) mostly and possibly other pigments but not haemoglobin.
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Jul 16, 2005 6:52 pm

Invertebrates have
-Hemocyanin(blue)-molusqs
-Cluoroclurine(green)-anelids
-Hemoeritine(no color)-don't remember where

There is also a difference between blood cells:
Invertebrates have only one type of cells: there are named amibocytes and have a main function in imunity
Vertebrates have red blood cells, leucocytes and cell plates

Also a notable thing is that the circular fluid is named blood only at vertebrates. At invertebrates it is named hemolimph(translation probably wrong :lol: )
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Postby Dr.Stein » Sun Jul 17, 2005 2:46 am

In most bloody invertebrates, the circulatory system is an open system - the hemolymph (this is the best spelling hehe :D), except annelids.
In all vertebrates, the circulatory system is a close system - the blood and the lymph.
Actually the lymph circulatory in vertebrates is an open system.

Now, I would like to know how you define and distinguish between open circulatory system vs close circulatory system correctly.
Because here in my country, in high school level teachers usually put a wrong definition for students (what a pity! :cry:) so when they continue to study in university/college, especially in my faculty we have to "wash their brain" and change their "ideology" about those two statements :evil: :lol:
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Jul 17, 2005 8:42 pm

Open-the hemolimph passes through open spaces, that do not have their own walls, when the go from arteries to veins. Did i pass?
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:09 pm

Oh yeah... Invertebrates can have hemoglobine but it is not inside cells, it is dissolved in the hemolimph like all other pigments
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Postby Dr.Stein » Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:53 am

You are correct, Andrew :wink:
My students used to have this definition: "Open circulatory system does not have vessels, after come out from heart, bloods enter the tissues directly". Whoaaa... :lol: Of course this system has artery (aorta) to flow bloods from heart to the tissues and vein to collect haemolymph from the tissues back to the heart. There is a period when bloods flow inside their vessels and in another period they flows outside their vessels, the haemolymph :)

Can you tell me the invertebrate specimen that has haemoglobin?

Oh not neccessary, I found them myself: nematodes, annelids, some echinoderms, some mollusks... :lol: :wink:
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:14 pm

Lol... come on... You can't test things like that on me... I am a geek.. I want to go to IBO... Ask normal people and see if they know... To me it seems pretty simple...
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Postby Dr.Stein » Tue Jul 19, 2005 1:39 am

Aha! :lol: No, I did not test you, I really completely forgot about invertebrates that possess haemoglobin. I think only human has that, ohohohoh sounds egocentric huh? :D Well, I am too long off from animals and stuck into human stuff awawawaaaaa I missed my Zoology class :cry: :)
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Jul 19, 2005 7:56 pm

i was reffering to the open/closed circulatory sistem
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