Login

Join for Free!
112456 members


Why is bacteria good?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderator: BioTeam

Why is bacteria good?

Postby cavaliers24 » Fri Feb 13, 2009 4:29 pm

In my biology class at school, we are doing a project on why bacteria is helpful in today's society. We are suppose to give examples of why they are good like food products and their significance in the science and technology industry. I found many examples including yogurt, cheese, sauerkraut, pesticide controls, and stopping acne on skin, but I can't find any reliable sources of information on what makes them so successful. My teacher also mentioned something about the cell wall, and how they are helpful with their interaction with other living things. If someone could please help me, it would be very much appreciated! Thanks again
Cecilia
cavaliers24
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 4:23 pm

Postby mith » Fri Feb 13, 2009 4:48 pm

fast growth, evolution(they have like 3 billion years of head start), simple nutrition requirements.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby canalon » Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:06 pm

For other vey important benefits, look up the Nitrogen cycle and the history of chloroplast and mitochondria, and cyanobacteria (now).
As for the reasons of their success one word: adaptation. Where do you not find bacteria? Besides molten lava, very few places are naturally sterile on Earth. Thanks to the extremohiles (archaea and bacteria), most environments are colonized by living beings.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada


Postby biohazard » Fri Feb 13, 2009 9:39 pm

I'd also like to add that they are relatively easy to engineer: in research and medicine bacterial genome is often manipulated in order to make them produce some desired protein. Recombinant human insulin is a very good example of a drug that is produced in bacteria. Humulin N is the trade name of one such insulin product. Try searching topics that cover biotechnology and recombinant protein production.

Just bear in mind that also eukaryotic cells can be used in similar manner; yeasts are often used, as are insect cells (with e.g. baculovirus vectors) and even human cells. But this is where the benefits of bacteria can be seen: they are much more simple and cheap to grow than cells from higher organisms. Though they do have drawbacks as well, such as incorrect protein folding and lack of glycosylation, but I guess this goes bit off topic what comes to the original question :)
User avatar
biohazard
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2007 6:45 pm

Postby JorgeLobo » Sun Feb 15, 2009 3:06 am

He did say "bacteria." No mitochondria and no chloroplast much less their "history".
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Re:

Postby MichaelXY » Sun Feb 15, 2009 8:40 am

JorgeLobo wrote:He did say "bacteria." No mitochondria and no chloroplast much less their "history".


Ever heard of endosymbiosis?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endosymbiotic_theory
User avatar
MichaelXY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:03 pm
Location: San Diego, Ca

Postby mcar » Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:12 pm

Really sophisticated organisms, no doubt.
---Just one act of random kindness at a time and you can change the world---
mcar
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Fri May 27, 2005 8:58 am
Location: Pilipinas a.k.a. Three Stars and a Sun (300, 000 sq Km)

Postby miles500 » Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:10 pm

Also don't forget bacteria is plural, so you should say 'Why bacteria are good'.
Bacterium is the singular.
miles500
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:50 am

Postby JorgeLobo » Mon Feb 16, 2009 2:03 pm

Micheal - ever learn to read? He said "bacteria." Answer the question please. This is not the place for you to show off the little bit you know. Endosymbiosis is a theory that addresses eukaryotic development/evolution. Bacteria are prokarytoic with neither mitchondria nor chloroplasts. Got it?

Right miles - thanks.
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Re:

Postby MichaelXY » Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:55 am

JorgeLobo wrote:Micheal - ever learn to read? He said "bacteria." Answer the question please. This is not the place for you to show off the little bit you know. Endosymbiosis is a theory that addresses eukaryotic development/evolution. Bacteria are prokarytoic with neither mitchondria nor chloroplasts. Got it?

Right miles - thanks.


Perhaps your predilection with showing your disdain for others has narrowed your vision. The question was, “How are bacteria good”. If one believes the endosymbiotic theory, and there is strong evidence to support this, then one might conclude that bacteria are good in that bacteria created a way for simple organisms to develop into the more complex organisms found today due to endosymbiosis.

And whether or not I am right in my thinking, there is no need for the malevolent tone in your responses. I do not know what has transpired in your past to make you so confrontational, but please do not take that posture here, and for Pete's sake leave your baggage elsewhere. Allow me to direct you to this link.
http://www.westegg.com/unmaintained/car ... iends.html

You really should read the contents of this book, and maybe you might find some inner peace that will allow you to better interact with others.
User avatar
MichaelXY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:03 pm
Location: San Diego, Ca

Postby mith » Tue Feb 17, 2009 9:09 am

Lobo, you're a smart guy and you contribute a lot to this forum, but you don't have to be a dick about it. There's ways to talk without making snide personal attacks..
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby JorgeLobo » Wed Feb 18, 2009 11:46 am

LOL - such whining - typical of folks with little to offer. Whether the pompous micheal "malevolent tone" or the inarticulate mith "be as dick", you guys should answer the question. Really like Micheal and the lame expression of HIS "theory" - now the poor clown is a pop psychologist.!!

Look kiddies, just answer the question. I understand that your sensitive egos require that you show off by wandering from the subject to display the little additional information you have to offer. Save it for your parents - they'll be so proud!
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Next

Return to Microbiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron