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clicking my big toes

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clicking my big toes

Postby skilban » Wed Jun 22, 2005 9:31 am

i often click my toes and it gives me a great dose of pleasure, i know its not good for me, but i cant stop, what actually happens when my toes click?
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Postby Navin » Wed Jun 22, 2005 12:05 pm

if im not wrong, i think the same thing happens when you pop your knuckles. But now, i am not sure.
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Postby b_d_41501 » Wed Jun 22, 2005 2:09 pm

Joints produce that CRACK when bubbles burst in the fluid surrounding the joint.

When you stretch or bend your finger to pop the knuckle, you are causing the bones of the joint to pull apart. As they do, the connective tissue capsule that surrounds the joint is stretched. By stretching this capsule, you increase its volume. And as we know from chemistry class, with an increase in volume comes a decrease in pressure. So as the pressure of the synovial fluid drops, gases dissolved in the fluid become less soluble, forming bubbles through a process called cavitation. When the joint is stretched far enough, the pressure in the capsule drops so low that these bubbles burst, producing the pop that we associate with knuckle cracking. It takes about 25-30 minutes for the gas to redissolve into the joint fluid. During this period of time, your knuckles will not crack. Once the gas is redissolved, cavitation is once again possible, and you can start popping your knuckles again. As for the harms associated with this habit, according to Anatomy and Physiology Instructors' Cooperative, only one in-depth study regarding the possible detriments of knuckle popping has been published. This study, done by Raymond Brodeur and published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, examined 300 knuckle crackers for evidence of joint damage. The results revealed no apparent connection between joint cracking and arthritis; however, habitual knuckle poppers did show signs of other types of damage, including soft tissue damage to the joint capsule and a decrease in grip strength. This damage is most likely a result of the rapid, repeated stretching of the ligaments surrounding the joint. A professional baseball pitcher experiences similar, although obviously heightened, effects in the various joints of his pitching arm. But assuming you haven't signed a multimillion dollar contract to constantly pop your knuckles, it hardly seems worth the possible risk to your joints.
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Postby skilban » Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:46 am

thanks for the information and ill try to stop but it just feels so good though
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Postby skilban » Thu Jun 23, 2005 9:05 am

however i do have 1 other problem you say it should take between 20-30 minutes before i can crack my knuckles, but when i crack my toes this is not the case at all, i can click my toes as often as i want, so for an example i can click them for around about 15 times a minute, therefore proving that there must be another explanation for this
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Postby b_d_41501 » Thu Jun 23, 2005 4:10 pm

Hmmm....maybe it refills much quicker in toes
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Postby Beetle » Thu Jun 23, 2005 11:13 pm

b_d_41501 you said that when pressure get too low bubbles burst. If they are in the joint capsule and in the synovial liquid where do they burst?

I think that when one can crack joints constantly it`s not because of bubbles (although it can be the in some cases) but it`s because of bad cartilage between bones. It can be chronical like in some diseases (arthitis, badly healed break) or acute like when we sit in front of the computer for several hours and then cracks our neck around.
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Postby b_d_41501 » Fri Jun 24, 2005 12:12 am

We're all entitled to our opinions on how stuff works, but this is something that is proven already. When you press the toe (or apply some sort of pressure to the joint) the joint slightly separates. When this happens the gas makes a pop (or click) sound because it is exiting this separation space. If you Google this you will find the same thing I said earlier. :D
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Postby Beetle » Sat Jun 25, 2005 11:00 pm

b_d don`t get emotional. I didn`t mean it in an offensiv way. I just didn`t understood how can bubbles burst. I thought that when bubble burst it means that it has relised it`s gas into some other surrounding gas. Then what happen inside the joint with gas. You mean like fast squizing from one part of joint to another?

And on my courses thay told me that it`s becouse of lack of hijalouronic acid (I hope this is how it should be written).
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Postby b_d_41501 » Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:04 am

Not getting emotional :wink: . It may seem that way sometimes but it's hard to tell the tone of people's statements over the internet; guess that's a big disadvantage to debating on here.
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Postby mith » Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:36 am

I believe a similar effect occurs with nitrogen in the bloodstream when you surface from diving too fast. It doesn't exactly pop but the decompression does cause extra nitrogen to be present in blood.
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Jun 26, 2005 8:54 pm

@Beetle
At high pressure, the gas disolves in the sinovial fluid. It's like the disolved oxygen in water, that's what fish drink. At low pressure, the molecules unite again to form gas.
@Mithril
When you dive nitrogen disolves in the blood. When you surface you need to do it slowly, or else nitrogen bubbles will appear in your blood vesels, causing them to burst. This is called a gaseous embolie. There have been many cases of death due to this phenomenon...
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