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NADH and FADH2

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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Postby sdekivit » Sun Sep 25, 2005 4:06 pm

victor wrote:Any reason Andrew??well, that's based on my bio book... :D


then it's wrong, because it's 30 or 32 ATP
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Sep 25, 2005 6:04 pm

I've read in some books and they said that the difference between 36 ATP and 38 ATP is based on the prokaryotic and Eukaryotic cell

This is what i meant. why? because i know otherwise :D Even in the human body, you can find both kinds of cells, depending on which methabolic pathway the reactions follow. i think Dr.Stein gave an example...
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Postby victor » Tue Sep 27, 2005 11:36 am

Um, quite confused actually but let me write it down once more.
we get 2 ATPs and 2FADH2 from glycolysis = total 6 ATPs.
we get 2 ATPs, 8 NADH+H and 2 FADH2 from Krebs = total 30 ATPs.
if all of the ATPs are summarized, it will be 36 ATPs right? (it's in eukaryotic)

If in prokaryotic:
we get 2 ATPs and 2 NADH+H = total 8 ATPs
we get 2 ATPs, 8 NADH+H and 2 FADH2 from Krebs = total 30 ATPs.
if all of the ATPs are summarized, it will be 38 ATPs right?

so?
I know, I haven't reach the more complicated stuff of BioChem but at least..is these right?
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Postby jeffrey » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:55 am

my friend, generally, for making 1 ATP cells have to use 3 H+, 2 electrons can pump 10 protons, further information in the book<<color atlas of biochemistry>> chapter of ATP synthesis
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Postby Morris » Fri Oct 28, 2005 7:00 pm

The transporter used in electron transport is NADH; Krebs cicle generates 6NADH; because to ossidate a glucose molecole are nedded two Krebs cicle, the total production of NADH is 12.
In the elctron transport every NADH produces 3ATP; so after electron transport are generated 36 molecules.
The total balance of aerobic metabolism is 38 ATP (2 ATP from glicolisis + 36 ATP from electron transpor = 38 ).
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Postby kittenkat10221964 » Thu Feb 28, 2008 11:16 pm

I need to figure out how many molecules of Nad+ are reduced to form NADH for each molecule of pyruvic acid that enters the Krebs Cycle?
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Mar 02, 2008 1:06 pm

google images for "krebs cycle" and you will get your answer
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Re: NADH and FADH2

Postby neutron55 » Thu Jul 11, 2013 1:35 am

i m gonna answer victor's question..
actually each NADH produced in glycolysis....produces 2 instead of 3ATPs...and it is called substrate level phosphorylation...because oxygen is not involved in it....hence the 2NADHs produced in glycolysis produces 4 ATPs...and i think total ATPs produced in glycolysis are 6...now u can easily get the result of net gain of 36 ATPs instead of 38 ATPs...ok...

YOUR PROBLEM SOLVED HERE...
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